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167

why do we need monads? We want to program only using functions. ("functional programming (FP)" after all). Then, we have a first big problem. This is a program: f(x) = 2 * x g(x,y) = x / y How can we say what is to be executed first? How can we form an ordered sequence of functions (i.e. a program) using no more than functions? Solution: compose ...


76

The answer is, of course, "We don't". As with all abstractions, it isn't necessary. Haskell does not need a monad abstraction. It isn't necessary for performing IO in a pure language. The IO type takes care of that just fine by itself. The existing monadic desugaring of do blocks could be replaced with desugaring to bindIO, returnIO, and failIO as defined ...


11

Benjamin Pierce said in TAPL A type system can be regarded as calculating a kind of static approximation to the run-time behaviours of the terms in a program. That's why a language equipped with a powerful type system is strictly more expressive, than a poorly typed language. You can think about monads in the same way. As @Carl and sigfpe point, you ...


9

I don't think IO should be seen as a particularly outstanding monad, but it's certainly one of the more astounding ones for beginners, so I'll use it for my explanation. Naïvely building an IO system for Haskell The simplest conceivable IO system for a purely-functional language (and in fact the one Haskell started out with) is this: main0 :: String ...


8

You can use MaybeT and the MonadPlus instance to use msum: f :: MaybeT IO Int f = msum [readInt, readInt, readInt]


7

I have defined a function useToken showing your use case: type Token = String getToken :: IO (Maybe Token) getToken = undefined getUsername :: Token -> IO (Maybe String) getUsername = undefined useToken :: IO (Maybe String) useToken = do token <- getToken case token of Just x -> getUsername x Nothing -> return Nothing If you ...


7

There are various constructs in Scala which carry failure case in them. There are Option, Either, Try and Future. (Futures main point is to abstract asynchronous operations, an error handling is there for convinience). Scalaz have even more: Validation (Disjunction and Maybe are better Either and Option). They all have a bit different treatment of erroneous ...


5

You can do something like this with a fair amount of ugliness if you really desire. {-# LANGUAGE FlexibleInstances #-} {-# LANGUAGE MultiParamTypeClasses #-} {-# LANGUAGE FunctionalDependencies #-} {-# LANGUAGE UndecidableInstances #-} import Control.Monad (join, liftM) class Joinable m z | z -> m where joins :: m z -> z instance Monad m => ...


4

The short answer is no. The slightly longer answer is you could probably define an infix operator. Take a look at the implementation for liftM: http://hackage.haskell.org/package/base-4.7.0.2/docs/src/Control-Monad.html#liftM It defines up to liftM5. This is because it's not possible to define liftMN, just like your joinN isn't possible. But we can take a ...


4

Try[A] represents a synchronous computation that may fail. Future[A] represents an asynchronous computation that may fail. Under this definitions, Future[Try[A]] represents the result of a synchronous computation (that may fail) executed inside of an asynchronous computation (that may fail). Does it make sense? Not to me, but I'm open to creative ...


4

This error message is a little bit confusing because GHC unpacked your Parser type into its definition of String -> [(a, String)]. If we undo this transformation, it'll start making a bit more sense: Expected type: Parser (Char, Char) Actual type: Parser ([(Char, String)], [(Char, String)]) Now it's starting to make a bit more sense. What it looks ...


4

You need the alternative instance for MaybeT: instance (Functor m, Monad m) => Alternative (MaybeT m) where empty = mzero (<|>) = mplus instance (Monad m) => MonadPlus (MaybeT m) where mzero = MaybeT (return Nothing) mplus x y = MaybeT $ do v <- runMaybeT x case v of Nothing -> runMaybeT y ...


2

Well, this might solve your problem: {-# LANGUAGE FlexibleInstances #-} import System.IO import System.Process import System.Exit import Control.Exception import Control.Monad import Control.Monad.IO.Class import Control.Monad.Trans.Maybe createCommand :: CmdSpec -> FilePath -> CreateProcess createCommand (ShellCommand command) curDir = (shell ...


2

As people in the comments suggest, you should just use monad transformers. However you can avoid this in your case. Monads do not commute in general, so you can't write a function with this signature bind' :: (Monad m, Monad n) => m (n a) -> (a -> m (n b)) -> m (n b) But all is ok, if the inner monad is an instance of the Traversable class: ...


2

It indeed works like your second description where a new immutable state is returned. It isn't particularly useful if you call it like this, however. Where it comes in handy is if you have a bunch of functions you want to call, each taking the state returned from the previous step and returning a new state and possibly another value. Making it a monad ...


2

A single function for every possible N? Not really. Generalizing over functions with different numbers of arguments like this is difficult in Haskell, in part because "number of arguments" is not always well-defined. The following are all valid specializations of id's type: id :: a -> a id :: (a -> a) -> a -> a id :: (a -> a -> a) -> a ...


1

The purpose of the state monad is to hide the passing of state between functions. Let's take an example: The methods A and B need to use some state and mutate it, and B needs to use the state that A mutated. In a functional language with immutable data, this is impossible. What is done instead is this: an initial state is passed to A, along with the ...


1

The problem is that the do notation in your definition of p is not using the monad you want it to use. I could be wrong, but it looks like p is using a version of the Reader monad. If you use this definition you'll see that x and y are not Char values but have type [(Char,String)]: import Debug.Trace p :: Parser (Char,Char) p = do x <- item y ...


1

Well, I am pretty sure I figured it out. Instead of using "fancy" stuff, I fell back to good ol' recursion. runCommands :: [String] -> FilePath -> IO (Maybe String) runCommands [] _ = return Nothing runCommands (command:rest) curDir = do result <- execCommand command curDir case result of Nothing -> runCommands rest curDir Just err ...


1

Another way of doing this is with the iterative monad transformer from the free package. import Control.Monad.Trans.Iter (untilJust,retract,cutoff,IterT) readInt :: IO (Maybe Int) readInt = undefined f' :: IterT IO Int f' = untilJust readInt f :: IO (Maybe Int) f = (retract . cutoff 2) f' Where cutoff specifies the maximum number of retries. The ...


1

why do we need monads? We want to program only using functions. ("funtional programming" after all -FP). Then, we have a first big problem. This is a program: f(x) = 2 * x g(x,y) = x / y How can we say what is to be executed first? How can we form an ordered sequence of functions (i.e. a program) using no more than functions? Solution: compose ...


1

First of all, n2 <- readInt case n2 of Just n' -> return (Just n') Nothing -> return Nothing is really just readInt. You are picking apart a Maybe value in order to put together the same one. For the rest, I think the most succinct way in this case is to use the maybe function. Then you can get just f = maybe readInt (return . ...



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