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64

No. Consider the trivial monad: data Trivial a = Cow instance Monad Trivial where _ >>= _ = Cow return _ = Cow


29

This is the Applicative Monad Proposal (AMP). Now whenever you declare something as Monad, you also have to declare it as Applicative (and therefore Functor). Mathematically speaking, every monad is an applicative functor, so this makes sense. You can do the following to remove the error: instance Functor Wrap where famp f (Wrap x) = Wrap (f x) instance ...


23

In the business of library design, we face a choice point here, and we have chosen to be less than entirely consistent in our collective policy (or lack of it). Monoid instances for Monad (or Applicative) type constructors can come about in a variety of ways. Pointwise lifting is always available, but we don't define instance (Applicative f, Monoid x) ...


20

That was meant to happen with the Applicative-Monad proposal (which has made it to GHC 7.10). However, there is a technical issue involving type roles in GHC which has postponed indefinitely the implementation of what you suggest.


19

But that use of ap is not in the context of Maybe. We're using it with a function, fromMaybe, so it's in the context of functions, where ap f g x = f x (g x) Among the various Monad instances we have instance Monad ((->) r) so it is ap :: Monad m => m (a -> b) -> m a -> m b fromMaybe :: r -> (Maybe r -> r) ...


18

do [1, 2, 3]; "hello" desugars to [1, 2, 3] >> "hello" which is the same as [1, 2, 3] >>= (\_ -> "hello") which is the same as concatMap (\_ -> "hello") [1, 2, 3] which is the same as concat (map (\_ -> "hello") [1, 2, 3]) which is the same as concat [(\_ -> "hello") 1, (\_ -> "hello") 2, (\_ -> "hello") 3]) ...


18

You are responsible for enforcing that a Monad instance obeys the monad laws. Here's a simple example that doesn't. Even though its type is compatible with the Monad methods, counting the number of times the bind operator has been used isn't a Monad because it violates the law m >>= return = m {-# Language DeriveFunctor #-} import Control.Monad ...


16

Well, of course, it's possible to define it, but I doubt it would be of any use. There is a popular saying that "monad is just a monoid in a category of endofunctors". What it means is, first of all, that we have a category of endofunctors (meaning, (covariant) functors from some category to itself), and what's more, we have some multiplication on this ...


16

Well, you've stumbled upon a kind of weird monad. The monad in question is the Monad ((->) r). Now, what does that mean? Well, it's the monad of functions of the form r -> *. I.e., of functions that take the same type of input. You asked what the type of a and b are in this instance. Well, they are both Num a => a, but that doesn't really explain ...


16

There are at least three relevant aspects to this question. Given a Monad m instance, what is the specification of its necessary Applicative m superclass instance? Answer: pure is return, <*> is ap, so mf <*> ms == do f <- mf; s <- ms; return (f s) Note that this specification is not a law of the Applicative class. It's a requirement ...


16

First, since Monoids are not unique, neither are Writer Monads or Applicatives. Consider data M a = M Int a then you can give it Applicative and Monad instances isomorphic to either of: Writer (Sum Int) Writer (Product Int) Given a Monoid instance for a type s, another isomorphic pair with different Applicative/Monad instances is: ReaderT s (Writer s) ...


16

Functor is defined as: class Functor f where fmap :: (a -> b) -> (f a -> f b) Cofunctor could be defined as follows: class Cofunctor f where cofmap :: (b -> a) -> (f b -> f a) So, both are technically the same, and that's why Cofunctor does not exist. "The dual concept of 'functor in general' is still 'functor in general'". ...


15

This is a lie: getResultCounter :: String -> Integer The type signature above is promising that the resulting integer only depends on the input string, when this is not the case: Google can add/remove results from one call to the other, affecting the output. Making the type more honest, we get getResultCounter :: String -> IO Integer This ...


15

It took me a while to see what was actually going on here: main = do { let x = [0..10]; print x } The above looks as if we have a do with two statements, which is perfectly fine. Sure, it is not common practice to use explicit braces-and-semicolons when indentation implicitly inserts them. But they shouldn't hurt... why then the above fails ...


15

This is available here as a .lhs file. The MaybeT transformer will allow us to break out of a monad computation much like throwing an exception. I'll first quickly go over some preliminaries. Skip down to Adding Maybe powers to IO for a worked example. First some imports: import Control.Monad import Control.Monad.Trans import Control.Monad.Trans.Maybe ...


15

Given that every Applicative has a Backwards counterpart, newtype Backwards f x = Backwards {backwards :: f x} instance Applicative f => Applicative (Backwards f) where pure x = Backwards (pure x) Backwards ff <*> Backwards fs = Backwards (flip ($) <$> fs <*> ff) it's unusual for Applicative to be uniquely determined, just as (and ...


14

tl;dr: It's not possible without adjustments to the definition of PT. Here's the core problem: you'll be running your stateful computation in the context of some sort of storage medium, but said storage medium has to know how to store arbitrary types. This isn't possible without packaging up some sort of evidence into the MkRef constructor - either an ...


14

I'll take another swing at this. Is this a valid usage? Yes, in the narrow sense that it compiles and produces the results that you're expecting. Is this intended usage? No. Now, sometimes things find usefulness beyond what they were originally for, and if this works out, great. But for Optional, we have found that usually things don't work out very well. ...


14

Apologies for laconic and mechanical answer. I don't like cherry-picking things like Applicative or Monad, but I don't know where you're at. This is not my usual approach to teaching Haskell. First, ap is really (<*>) under the hood. Prelude> import Control.Monad Prelude> import Data.Maybe Prelude> import Control.Applicative Prelude> :t ...


14

What is the feature that is missing in the Java type system? How do these other languages declare the Monad type? Good question! Eric Lippert refers to this as higher types, but I can't get my head around them. You are not alone. But they are actually not as crazy as they sound. Let's answer both of your questions by looking at how Haskell ...


13

The getStdRandom function basically looks up a StdGen value in a global variable, runs some function on it, puts the new seed back into the global variable, and returns the result to the caller. If the function in question returns with an error, that error gets put into the global variable. Now all attempts to use this global variable will throw an ...


13

According to this issue in the bug tracker the old definition does not obey the associative law. Although I know little about such things, I suspect an other problem is redundancy: Pure a Plus [Pure a] Plus [Plus [Pure a]] ... all seem to represent the same thing. Free structures are generally supposed to be unique. There are times when they cannot be ...


13

You can't do this, in general. The problem is your result type: m (a -> a). This is a single monadic action which produces a function; but your first input has the form a -> m a, which (potentially) produces a different monadic action for each argument. So, for example, for the [] monad [a -> a] is list of functions with a fixed length, whereas a ...


12

State passing is often tedious, error-prone, and hinders refactoring. For example, try labeling a binary tree or rose tree in postorder: data RoseTree a = Node a [RoseTree a] deriving (Show) postLabel :: RoseTree a -> RoseTree Int postLabel = fst . go 0 where go i (Node _ ts) = (Node i' ts', i' + 1) where (ts', i') = gots i ts gots i [] ...


12

Here is a very simple example of something one can do with Alternative: import Control.Applicative import Data.Foldable data Nested f a = Leaf a | Branch (Nested f (f a)) flatten :: (Foldable f, Alternative f) => Nested f a -> f a flatten (Leaf x) = pure x flatten (Branch b) = asum (flatten b) Now let's try the same thing with Monoid: ...


12

First note that this has nothing whatsoever to do with IO. It has to do with monads, but with a very specific one: the list monad. instance Monad [] where return x = [x] f >>= xs = concat $ map f xs -- aka `(>>=) = concatMap`. It is best know for list comprehensions, which are basically syntactic sugar†: [ result x y z | x <- ...


12

If you turn on DeriveFunctor, you can write data Zero a deriving Functor but you might consider that cheating. If you want to write it yourself, you can turn on EmptyCase, instead, then write the funky-looking instance Functor Zero where fmap f z = case z of


12

I have now downloaded the source of both Tardis and RevState, and I started hacking on them until they are almost the same: I ignored everything outside the Trans.{Tarids,RevState} modules, so that I don't have to bother with the typeclasses I removed the forward-propagating state of Tardis I renamed Tardis to State After a bit of reordering of code, I ...


12

Your instinct was right: terms which feature explicit names at binding sites do not form a monad. The signature of >>= offers some food for thought: (>>=) :: Lambda a -> (a -> Lambda b) -> Lambda b Binding a lambda term performs substitution. The function you bind is the environment mapping names a to terms Lambda b; >>= finds ...


12

The issue is that the scope of the lambda in your code is not quite right. It should extend all the way to the end of the expression, not just around the small computation. Your code should desugar to l >>= (\a -> m >>= (\b -> return (a, b)) You can drop the parentheses by the way, which makes it a little more pleasant. l >>= \a ...



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