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254

Why do we need monads? We want to program only using functions. ("functional programming (FP)" after all). Then, we have a first big problem. This is a program: f(x) = 2 * x g(x,y) = x / y How can we say what is to be executed first? How can we form an ordered sequence of functions (i.e. a program) using no more than functions? Solution: compose ...


107

The answer is, of course, "We don't". As with all abstractions, it isn't necessary. Haskell does not need a monad abstraction. It isn't necessary for performing IO in a pure language. The IO type takes care of that just fine by itself. The existing monadic desugaring of do blocks could be replaced with desugaring to bindIO, returnIO, and failIO as defined ...


74

As ever, the terminology people use is not entirely consistent. There's a variety of inspired-by-monads-but-strictly-speaking-isn't-quite notions. The term "indexed monad" is one of a number (including "monadish" and "parameterised monad" (Atkey's name for them)) of terms used to characterize one such notion. (Another such notion, if you're interested, is ...


32

As Ørjan Johansen said, Scala does not support method dispatching on return type. Scala object system is built over JVM one, and JVM invokevirtual instruction, which is the main tool for dynamic polymorphism, dispatches the call based on type of this object. As a side note, dispatching is a process of selecting concrete method to call. In Scala/Java all ...


31

The expression you are forcing is ((print "hi") >>= (\r -> return ())), which is of type IO (). As such it represents an IO action. But evaluating such a thing is quite different from running it! Evaluating a value means performing just enough steps to turn it into what is called weak head normal form. Because IO is abstract, it is a bit tricky to ...


28

Monad is a concept, an abstract interface if you will, that simply defines a way of composing data. Option supports composition via flatMap, and that's pretty much everything that is needed to wear the "monad badge". From a theoretical point of view, it should also: support a unit operation (return, in Haskell terms) to create a monad out of a bare ...


28

There are at least three ways to define an indexed monad that I know. I'll refer to these options as indexed monads à la X, where X ranges over the computer scientists Bob Atkey, Conor McBride and Dominic Orchard, as that is how I tend to think of them. Parts of these constructions have a much longer more illustrious history and nicer interpretations ...


22

The monad is IO. This is a minor quirk of the behaviour of GHCi. It tries to unify the type of your input with IO a; if it succeeds, it runs that IO action and tries to show the result. If you give it something other than an IO action, it simply tries to show the value. It’s for the same reason that these produce the same output: Prelude> "hello" ...


21

Don't let monads get in the way here. Think about application. Compare: (<$>) :: Functor f => (a -> b) -> f a -> f b and ($) :: (a -> b) -> a -> b You can see there is a connection between regular application and application under a functor. Trivia: there have been proposals to use brackets to overload whitespace ...


21

The type Monad m => ((a -> b) -> c) -> (a -> m b) -> m c is not inhabited, i.e., there is no term t having that type (unless you exploit divergence, e.g. infinite recursion, error, undefined, etc.). This means, unfortunately, that it is impossible to implement the operator someOp. Proof To prove that it is impossible to construct such ...


19

You're confusing evaluation with execution. When you force an expression like print "hi", that doesn't print anything out. It just produces a value (in this case, a value of type IO()) representing the action of printing something out. You can think of the value of print "hi" as a recipe for printing "hi".


19

As a simple scenario, assume you have a state monad. The state type is a complex large one, yet all these states can be partitioned into two sets: red and blue states. Some operations in this monad make sense only if the current state is a blue state. Among these, some will keep the state blue (blueToBlue), while others will make the state red (blueToRed). ...


17

Trying to say "x gets bound to" is setting you up for failure. Let me explain, and guide you towards a better way of expressing yourself when talking about these sorts of things. Suppose we have: someList.flatMap(x => some_expression) If we know that someList has type List[Int], then we can safely say that inside of some_expression, x is bound to a ...


17

The answer to "why does it take parameters in this order" is basically "because". Whoever defined these functions thought that was the best way. (And it probably wasn't the same person in each case.) I will, however, offer some examples: Suppose we have a parsing monad of some kind. Suppose also that we have defined data Foobar = Foobar X Y Z parseFoo ...


17

MonadRandom is a class, not a type with kind * -> *, like Maybe for example. Usually, you would use something like instance MonadRandom m => Functor m where fmap = liftM instance MonadRandom m => Applicative m where pure = return (<*>) = ap However, in this case the instances of MonadRandom are already functors, so now the ...


17

A comonad has an extract :: w a -> a method, which cannot be (reasonably) implemented for IO. Input is not really context sensitive in the sense of a comonad. "Context sensitivity" for a comonad means that it is sensitive to the larger context in the data structure. For example, a list zipper is like a list with some extra position information about ...


16

You can use the ReaderT monad transformer to compose the Reader monad and the Try monad into a single monad that you can use a for-comprehension on, etc. ReaderT is just a type alias for Kleisli, and you can use Kleisli.kleisli instead of Reader.apply to construct your Reader-y computations. Note that you need scalaz-contrib for the monad instance for Try ...


16

An indexed monad isn't a specific monad like, for example, the state monad but a sort of generalization of the monad concept with extra type parameters. Whereas a "standard" monadic value has the type Monad m => m a a value in an indexed monad would be IndexedMonad m => m i j a where i and j are index types so that i is the type of the index at the ...


16

No. Monads have nothing to do with purity or impurity in principle. It just so happens that IO models impure code nicely, but Monad class can be used perfectly right for instances like State or Maybe, which are absolutely pure. Monads also allow expressing complex context hierarchies (as I choose to call them) in a very explicit way. "pure/impure" isn't ...


15

Benjamin Pierce said in TAPL A type system can be regarded as calculating a kind of static approximation to the run-time behaviours of the terms in a program. That's why a language equipped with a powerful type system is strictly more expressive, than a poorly typed language. You can think about monads in the same way. As @Carl and sigfpe point, you ...


15

The left shrinking (or tightening) law says that mfix (\x -> a >>= \y -> f x y) = a >>= \y -> mfix (\x -> f x y) In particular this means that mfix (\x -> a' >> f x) = a' >> mfix f which means that the monadic action inside mfix must be evaluated exactly once. This is one of the main properties of MonadFix ...


14

Let's just line up the types: (>>=) :: m a -> ( a -> m b) -> m b getLine :: IO String putStrLn :: (String -> IO ()) Here we have m = IO, a = String, and b = (), so we can substitute these into >>='s type signature to get a final type signature of (>>=) :: IO String -> (String -> IO ()) ...


14

It's called on (from Data.Function), although with flipped arguments: on :: (b -> b -> c) -> (a -> b) -> a -> a -> c -- lift = flip on Note that you could have found the function easily with a Hoogλe query. Also note that there's already a function lift, which is used in a completely other setting, namely monad transformers.


14

Your intuition that these two monads are closely related is exactly right. The difference is that Writer is much more limited, in that it doesn't allow you to read the accumulated state (until you cash out at the end). The only thing you can do with the state in a Writer is tack more stuff onto the end. More concisely, State[S, A] is a kind of wrapper for S ...


14

The definition you are looking for reads something like Concurrent h >>= k = Concurrent (\f -> h (\x -> runConcurrent (k x) f)) How did we get there? As always, we let the types do the work. :) Let us first introduce a helper function: runConcurrent :: Concurrent b -> (b -> Action) -> Action runConcurrent ...


13

The >> function only ignores the result of the first value but it doesn't ignore the side effect of the first value. To understand your example, see how Maybe Monad is defined: instance Monad Maybe where return = Just (Just x) >>= f = f x Nothing >>= _ = Nothing And >> function is defined like this: m >> k = m ...


12

The <*> here isn't acting on the [a] applicative, it's acting in the (->) a applicative instance. Essentially instance Applicative ((->) a) where pure = const -- same as monadic return f <*> a = \x -> f x (a x) So it acts like function application, but also wraps the application in a function and gives the argument to both ...


12

The function runST :: (forall s . ST s a) -> a is where the magic occurs. The right question to ask is what it takes to produce a computation which has type forall s . ST s a. Reading it as English, this is a computation which is valid for all choices of s, the phantom variable which indicates a particular "thread" of ST computation. When you use ...


11

It doesn't exist any more. Unfortunately, this makes many Haskell resources on the web outdated about it. To create a value, you can just use the state function: state :: (s -> (a, s)) -> State s a runState, which used to be a field of State, is now just a normal function itself, but it works in the same way as before. State has been rewritten in ...


11

Most of the standard library list functions have monadic versions that end with M: map :: (a -> b) -> [a] -> [b] mapM :: (Monad m) => (a -> m b) -> [a] -> m [b] replicate :: Int -> a -> [a] replicateM :: (Monad m) => Int -> m a -> m [a] etc. Sometimes they are in Prelude, sometimes they are in the Control.Monad. I ...



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