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With Hashes you can use merge to do what you want - so going through making each Array into a Hash you can do the following: hash_b.group_by { |e| e[:unique_key] }. merge(hash_a.group_by { |e| e[:unique_key] }).values.flatten # => [{:unique_key=>1, :data=>"data for A1"}, # {:unique_key=>2, :data=>"data for A2"}, # {:unique_key=&...


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You can use the form of Array#uniq that takes a block. (hash_a + hash_b).uniq { |h| h[:unique_key] } #=> [{:unique_key=>1, :data=>"data for A1"}, {:unique_key=>2, :data=>"data for A2"}, # {:unique_key=>3, :data=>"data for A3"}, {:unique_key=>4, :data=>"data for B4"}, # {:unique_key=>5, :data=>"data for B5"}] ...


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I started with something just like you by doing loop through millions of record and the memory just keep increasing. Original code: @portal.listings.each do |listing| listing.do_something end I've gone through many forum answers and I tried them out. 1st attempt: I try to use the combination of WeakRef and GC.start but no luck, I fail. 2nd attempt: ...



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