New answers tagged

0

You can't do that query in MongoDB. You need to format the collection data like the following: { "_id": ObjectId("5406e4c49b324869198b456a"), "cells": [ { "number": "5742a6af744f6b0dcf0003d1", "value": 1 }, { "number": "5742a6af744f6b0dcf0003d2", "value": 12 }, { "number": "5742a6af744f6b0dcf0003d3", "value": 12 } } } Then you can query ...


1

I started with something just like you by doing loop through millions of record and the memory just keep increasing. Original code: @portal.listings.each do |listing| listing.do_something end I've gone through many forum answers and I tried them out. 1st attempt: I try to use the combination of WeakRef and GC.start but no luck, I fail. 2nd attempt: ...


0

You just need to move factory girl out of the development environment. I had the same issue, so I just did group :test do gem 'faker' gem 'factory_girl_rails' end And works like a charm. I'm not using those gems at all in development so its correct to just define them in test.


0

The hash should contain an array of child_objects_attributes hashes { :p_test_field => "attr test one", :p_test_field_two => "attr test two", ... :child_objects_attributes => [ { :c_test_field => "test 1" } ] } With this calling ParentObject.create(hash) would create both objects and their associations. See https://mongoid....


-1

Adding these two methods to your Model and calling get_embedded_document_changes should provide you an hash with the changes to all its embedded documents: def get_embedded_document_changes data = {} relations.each do |name, relation| next unless [:embeds_one, :embeds_many].include? relation.macro.to_sym # only if changes are present child ...


0

A MongoDB query can only access one collection at a time, there are no joins here. When you say: 'test_two.start_time' => (...) MongoDB will be looking for a field in test_ones named test_two that is a hash (or array of hashes) with a start_time field inside that hash. You don't have that structure so your query doesn't find anything. Also, you can ...


0

"string" and ObjectId("string") are not the same thing in the MongoDB shell. "string" and BSON::ObjectId.from_string("string") are not the same thing when using Mongoid. So the equivalent Mongoid query to your JavaScript one would be: User.in(interest_ids: [BSON::ObjectId.from_string("string")]) .order_by(:rank => 'desc') .limit(100) or: User....


0

Ok, I've figured it out — mongoid associations have the optional option, which doesn't seem to documented very well. So it should be: class JournalItem include Mongoid::Document belongs_to :lot, optional: true end


0

It is important to understand how has_secure_password works internally: When a user is created or its password should be changed, its password (and a password_confirmation) attribute has to be set. But internally the password field isn't stored in the database, but its value is hashed and stored in a database field named password_digest. That means: When ...


0

Try this: class Api::V1::SchoolsController < ApplicationController def create school = School.new(school_params) if school.save render json: school, status: 201, location: [:api, school] else render json: { errors: school.errors }, status: 422 end end private def school_params params.require(:school).permit(:...


1

You can use the form of Array#uniq that takes a block. (hash_a + hash_b).uniq { |h| h[:unique_key] } #=> [{:unique_key=>1, :data=>"data for A1"}, {:unique_key=>2, :data=>"data for A2"}, # {:unique_key=>3, :data=>"data for A3"}, {:unique_key=>4, :data=>"data for B4"}, # {:unique_key=>5, :data=>"data for B5"}] ...


3

With Hashes you can use merge to do what you want - so going through making each Array into a Hash you can do the following: hash_b.group_by { |e| e[:unique_key] }. merge(hash_a.group_by { |e| e[:unique_key] }).values.flatten # => [{:unique_key=>1, :data=>"data for A1"}, # {:unique_key=>2, :data=>"data for A2"}, # {:unique_key=&...


0

Have you tried creating def name street_name end in PropertyInfo class? That should display in RA.


0

This turned out to be much more complicated than I imagined. The solution I came up with looks like: def update params names = params.delete( :books ) new_books = names.map{| title | Book.new( name:name )} validate_books_for new_books return false if errors.present? return false unless super( params ) self.books = new_books ...


0

I decided to take a look at the "Rails Tutorial - Adding a secure password" section by Michael Hartl. I saw that he wrote the code with has_secure_password before validates, as shown below: has_secure_password validates :password, presence: true, length: { minimum: 6 } Try changing the order of and see if that works. I have note tested it but this is one ...


0

You're always running your additional validation. has_secure_password already checks for the password. So you don't need the presence validation. You could simply make your validation conditional validates :password, length: { minimum: 6 }, if: Proc.new{|u| u.password_changed? } Should work I think using ActiveModel::Dirty If not you can just run ...


0

posts =Array.new PostActivity.order_by(:likes_count => :desc).each do |pa| posts << pa.post end this worked for me


0

class PostActivity field :likes, type: Array field :likes_count, type: Integer, default: 0 belongs_to :post, foreign_key: :post_id, class_name: "Post" before_save do self.likes_count = lies.size end end Now you can sort PostActivity model by likes_count field. PostActivity.order_by(:likes_count => :desc) You will have sorted ...


1

You can use Array#map to convert array of books attributes to array of books names. Then use Array#uniq to remove duplicates from array of books names, and then check if resulting array has the same size as the original array of books attributes: are_books_uniq = params[:books].map{|b| b[:name]}.uniq.size == params[:books].size This way you can perform ...


1

You can use an Active Record Transaction. Start the transaction, call save, and if it fails then the entire transaction will be rolled back. For example: Book.transaction do params[:books].each{ |b| Book.new(b).save! } end The entire transaction is aborted if there is an exception. You should handle this case by catching ActiveRecord::RecordInvalid.


0

You can use tag_sets. In the Mongoid config documentation you can see that, under the 'read' setting, you can specify the tag_set assigned to the secondary node you want to explicitly read from: # Change the default read preference. Valid options for mode are: :secondary, # :secondary_preferred, :primary, :primary_preferred, :nearest # (default: primary) ...


0

I will explain this in a sudo code so that you can come up with a solution. The first point to your answer is that -> No, you cannot do it in a straightforward manner. The reason behind this is that MongoDB does not have/support joins. Like in SQL where you can join two tables and query them for conditional results; the same is not doable in MongoDB. But ...


0

Yes the filesize is stored as length in the files collection according to the mongo docs You will have to grab some identifiable piece of information from the file to access it in mongo. The mongo docs show using filename: "<your_file_name>". To access it with the file _id- myid = BSON::ObjectId.from_string("57898fa2b5e1b565d4b9b5c8") result = ...


1

You're missing two things: Mongoid isn't ActiveRecord so it won't know what to do with todo_ids in the Tag query. 'todo_id.in' is a field path that is trying to look at the in field inside a todo_id hash, this isn't a use of MongoDB's $in operator. You can only work with one collection at a time so to fix the first one, you need to pull an array of IDs ...


0

try validates_uniqueness_of :day, scope: [:month,:year]


0

Mongo documentation says: You cannot use $size to find a range of sizes (for example: arrays with more than 1 element). If you need to query for a range, create an extra size field that you increment when you add elements. Indexes cannot be used for the $size portion of a query, although if other query expressions are included indexes may be used ...


0

In ruby, you can sort an array like this : my_array.sort_by(&:my_attr) It will sort the array my_array by the attribute my_attr of each element inside the array. You can also write it like this : my_array.sort_by{|element| element.my_attr } Which is exactly the same, it will sort by the my_attr attribute of each element. This second syntax is ...


0

I have a script that copies my database from heroku to my local its a really strait forward process, I am sorry that this is PG and not mongo but I am sure that this should help #lib/tasks/db.rake namespace :db do desc "Import most recent database dump" task :import_from_prod => :environment do puts 'heroku run pg:backups capture --app sushi-prod'...


0

I think you may have an error in your logic. Your code tests whether the new Timetracking is within an existing one, not whether it overlaps. So, you have 2 possibilities. I think you will need an or statement: It starts between another Timetracking's begin and end or It ends between another Timetracking begin and end Also, I suggest you write a few ...


0

You can use both "order" and "order_by", and they are equivalent. All these are equivalent: Book.order_by(created_at: :desc) Book.order_by(created_at: -1) Book.order(created_at: :desc) Book.order(created_at: -1) This is the source code from mongoid 5.1.3 "lib/mongoid/criteria/queryable/optional.rb": # Adds sorting criterion to the options. # # @example ...


0

If you need a unique index in the mongodb, you can do like this: class Person include Mongoid::Document field :first_name field :last_name index({ first_name: 1, last_name: 1 }, { unique: true }) end And the docs are here: https://docs.mongodb.com/ecosystem/tutorial/mongoid-indexes/ Hope this is helpful for you.


0

Person.index_specifications shows the indexes defined in the model regardless of its existence in the database. And Person.collection.indexes only shows the index that actually exists in the database. So there is something else that is worth paying attention to: rake db:mongoid:create_indexes will create the indexes defined in the model in the ...


0

You can use this: books = [{:name => "Harry Potter"}, {:name => "Night"}] Book.collection.insert_many(books) And I find that "insert" does not work for me(Monogoid 5.1.3): NoMethodError: undefined method `insert' for # <Mongo::Collection:0x007fbdbc9b1cd0> Did you mean? insert_one insert_many inspect This ...


0

If you want to access Homepage documents from top level, then you need to have their own collection. When we embed a document inside other, it is not stored in a separate collection, rather it is stored in the parent document itself. So, i think you should have class User include Mongoid::Document has_one :homepage end class Homepage include Mongoid:...


0

So I fixed my issue which was due to the view. In the form I had <%= b.text_field :cell_phone, autocomplete: autocomplete_bills_path %> I could not see the autocomplete list but when I changed it to <%= b.autocomplete_field :cell_phone, autocomplete: autocomplete_bills_path %> The autocomplete began to work. So problem solved.


0

This question was posted several years ago, before the Mongoid gem was taken over by the MongoDB team. Mongoid 5 is a significant upgrade, and the documentation has also been dramatically improved. I updated my applications to use Mongoid 5; the biggest change was that I had been using the lower level driver (Moped) for some operations, for better ...


0

To run query commands with Mongoid, Run mongo from the project directory to write your queries. Examples like show collections, db.users.find if there exist a users table.


1

The default max pool queue size is 5. Bumping max_pool_size up to e.g. 25 will enable more connections to your db. production: clients: default: options: max_pool_size: 25



Top 50 recent answers are included