Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

17

The best way to generate the tree is a series of random playouts. The trick is being able to balance between exploration and exploitation (this is where the UCT comes in). There are some good code samples and plenty of research paper references here : http://www.mcts.ai When I implemented the algorithm, I used random playouts until I hit an end point or ...


15

This is a classic example of Monte Carlo. But if you're trying to break the calculation of pi into parallel parts, why not just use an infinite series and let each core take a range, then sum the results as you go? http://mathworld.wolfram.com/PiFormulas.html


14

This online course is very easy and straightforward to understand and to me it explained particle filters really well. It's called "Programming a Robotic Car", and it talks about three methods of localiczation: Monte Carlo localization, Kalman filters and particle filters. The course is completely free (it's finished now so you can't actively participate ...


13

The problem seems to be that multiprocessing has a limit to the largest int it can pass to subprocesses inside an xrange. Here's a quick test: import sys from multiprocessing import Pool def doit(n): print n if __name__ == "__main__": procs = int(sys.argv[1]) iters = int(float(sys.argv[2])) p = Pool(processes=procs) for points in p.map(doit, ...


13

Monte Carlo methods are commonly used when the dimensionality of the problem is too high for traditional schemes. A great introductory paper on the subject is Persi Diaconis' The Markov Chain Monte Carlo Revolution.


12

"Monte Carlo" is, in my experience, a heavily overloaded term. People seem to use it for any technique that uses a random number generator (global optimization, scenario analysis (Google "Excel Monte Carlo simulation"), stochastic integration (the Pi calculation that everybody uses to demonstrate MC). I believe, because you mentioned evolutionary ...


11

It should say f(xi) f() is the function we are trying to integrate via the numerical monte carlo method, which estimates an integral (and its error) by evaluating randomly choosen points from the integration region. Ref.


9

Using multiple cores/machines should be simple if you're just using parallel independent replications, but be aware of common deficiencies of random number generators (e.g. if using the current time as seed, spawning many processes with one RNG for each might produce correlated random numbers, which leads to invalid results - see e.g. this paper) You might ...


9

A CPU intensive task like this will be slower if you do the work in more threads than there are CPU's in the system. If you are running it on a single CPU system, you will definitely see a slowdown with more than one thread. This is due to the OS having to switch between the various threads - this is pure overhead. You should ideally have the same number ...


9

Suppose that you want to estimate some quantity of interest. In the Joel's example 'ship date' is what you want to estimate. In most such situations, there are random factors that impact our estimates. When you have a random quantity, you typically wants to know its mean and the standard deviation so that you can take appropriate actions. In simple ...


9

It's probably what np.random.choice does in @Ophion's answer, but you can construct a normalized cumulative density function, then choose based on a uniform random number: from __future__ import division import numpy as np import matplotlib.pyplot as plt data = np.random.normal(size=1000) hist, bins = np.histogram(data, bins=50) bin_midpoints = bins[:-1] ...


8

The GPU runs threads in groups of 32 threads, called warps. Divergence can only happen within a warp. So, if you are able to arrange your threads in such a way that the if condition evaluates the same way in the entire warp, there is no divergence. When there is divergence in an if, conceptually, the GPU simply ignores the results and memory requests from ...


8

You can try using an existing Java implementation (or this one) for a Mersenne Twister. Keep in mind most MT's are not cryptographically secure.


8

Here's an algorithm that allows you to generate points randomly distributed on the unit sphere.


8

Use the following invoke combinator to apply a function to a value in another (forked) process and then block waiting for its result when the () value is applied: let invoke (f : 'a -> 'b) x : unit -> 'b = let input, output = Unix.pipe() in match Unix.fork() with | -1 -> (let v = f x in fun () -> v) | 0 -> Unix.close ...


8

Your fractional error goes by sqrt(N)/N = 1/sqrt(N), So this is a very inefficient way to get a precise estimate. This limit is set by the statistical nature of the measurement and can't be beaten. You should be able to get about floor(log_10(N))/2-1 digits of good precision for N throws. Maybe -2 just to be safe... Even at that it assumes that you are ...


8

If you are going to wait until all the results are computed before you use any of the results, preallocate space for 4,000 results in the vector and have each thread write into one range of elements in the vector. No locking is required because no two threads access the same element in the vector. If you want to use the results as they are computed, use ...


7

Is rand() thread safe? Maybe, maybe not: The rand() function need not be reentrant. A function that is not required to be reentrant is not required to be thread-safe." One test and good learning exercise would be to replace the call to rand() with, say, a fixed integer and see what happens. The way I think of pseudo-random number generators is as a ...


7

Your goal is to compute the integral of f from x1 to x2. For example, you may wish to compute the integral of sin(x) from 0 to pi. Using Monte Carlo integration, you can approximate this by sampling random points in the interval [x1,x2] and evaluating f at those points. Perhaps you'd like to call this MonteCarloIntegrate( f, x1, x2 ). So no, ...


7

If you're doing any kind of heavy duty numerical calculation, considering learning numpy. Your problem is essentially a one-linear with a numpy setup: import numpy as np N = 10000 pts = np.random.random((N,2)) # Select the points according to your condition idx = (pts**2).sum(axis=1) < 1.0 print pts[idx], idx.sum() Giving: [[ 0.61255615 ...


7

There are several options, depending on your exact needs. I suspect the first option, the simplest is not sufficient, but my second and third options may be more appropriate, with the third option the most automatable. Option 1 If you know in advance that the function using/creating random numbers will always draw the same number, and you don't reorder the ...


6

%f format specifier in printf expects double type argument. &pirprox and &pitprox is of type double * and you cannot print an address with %f. Wrong format specifier would invoke undefined behavior. Change your code snippet printf("%f\n", &pirprox); printf("%f\n", &pitprox); to printf("%f\n", pirprox); printf("%f\n", pitprox); ...


6

MCMC methods tend to be useful when the underlying function is complex (sometimes too complicated to directly compute) and/or in high-dimensional spaces. They are often used when nothing else is feasible or works well. Since you have a simple, low-dimensional problem, I wouldn't expect MCMC approaches to be especially helpful for you. If you can perform ...


6

Looking at the code of the networksis package for R might be helpful. I believe that efficient computation requires fancy Markov Chain sequential importance resampling techniques, so you might want to avoid reimplementing this if you can avoid it. Edit: The relevant paper is Chen, Diaconis, Holmes, and Liu (2005). In the words of the authors, "[o]ur method ...


6

Konrad Rudolph has published a short tutorial on ACO's on a german programming website. It contains a fully-working VB.NET example project (in English) solving a Traveling Salesman Problem using an ACO.


6

It looks like you are using some kind of auto-parallelizing compiler. I am going to assume you have more than 1 core/CPU in your system (as that would be too obvious -- and no hyperthreading on a Pentium 4 doesn't count as having two cores, regardless of what Intel's marketing would have you believe.) There are two problems that I see. The first is ...


6

You may misunderstand what is expected of you. Given a (properly normalized) PDF, and wanting to throw a random distribution consistent with it, you form the Cumulative Probability Distribution (CDF) by integrating the PDF, then invert the CDF, and use a uniform random predicate as the argument of the inverted function. A little more detail. f_s(l) is ...


6

A few points: Don't define RAND_MAX yourself. main returns an int. Only call srand once. Eliminate the extra calls to srand, and use one function to initialize your arrays. You defined X, Y, and Z as arrays, but really only used/needed one value each. There seems to be no reason to use dynamic allocation since your arrays sizes are fixed.


6

Ok, I solved the problem by adding the code: //If this move is terminal and the opponent wins, this means we have //previously made a move where the opponent can always find a move to win.. not good if (game.GetWinner() == Opponent(startPlayer)) { current.parent.value = int.MinValue; return 0; ...


5

If you are just trying to average each inner list, you can use: List<double> averagedData = myFullList.Select(l => l.Average()).ToList(); If you are trying to average the "columns" of data, which seems to be the case from your sample, you could do something like: var averagedData = myFullList[0].Select((v,c) => ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible