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For the first piece of code, I guess the reason why you have unexpected result is when you are doing the calculations on hlp, you try to avoid 0 values, as 0^eta will blow up - and that is not wanted result, so you simply drop it. But in the last step, mean(hlp) will take all values in array hlp, including those 0's. Try this: ...


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Have a look at this MSDN article by James McCaffrey, I've been using a modified version of it for a while and it gave me very satisfying results. The article is very clear and the code is very clean and efficient.


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The number of failing devices per yer (or whatever unit of time) follows the Poisson distribution. If you have n units for m years, and the failure rate per year is p, then you can get a random number for the number of failing units by using numpy.random.poisson: import numpy as np n = 100000 m = 5 p = 1.0 / 100000 failed = np.random.poisson(n * m * p) ...


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I guess there is not one big universal reason for this, but rather a number of small things that have led to people liking it and getting used to it. As already said by @PaulR in the comments, there are a number of algorithms that prefer power of two sizes, most notably recursive divide and conquer algorithms, where a power of two size guarantees that one ...


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The error "illegal reference to non-static member" tells you that you're trying to access a member variable or function as if it was static. For example, with MonteCarlo<T> :: stepsNumber the MonteCarlo<T> part is just the name of a type, not an actual instance of it. Either you need to change your MonteCarlo class to have static members. Or ...



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