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This is what we did, worked great. The implementation below is CDI only (deployed to Tomcat), but also works with @Stateless beans. We let Mongo and Morphia be @Produced by a factory. The @QConfig annotated name is produced by a producer that reads a .properties file from the class path that contains the MongoDB database name. public interface ...


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You are looking for distinct, which should work for lists / arrays as well. MongoDB will use an index if one is available. Unfortunately this feature isn't yet implemented in Morphia, but you can do the following with the Java driver: DBCollection c = collection; List bars = c.distinct("bars"); For a more complex example see the unit test for this ...


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The following code will show exceptions like yours: package com.test.mongodb; import java.io.IOException; import java.io.Serializable; import org.junit.Test; import com.mongodb.BasicDBObject; import com.mongodb.DBCollection; import com.mongodb.MongoClient; public class TestMongo { static class Temp implements Serializable { private static ...


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I tried creating a Custom Converter: public class InfoChartInformationMorphiaConverter extends TypeConverter{ public InfoChartInformationMorphiaConverter() { super(InfoChartInformation.class); } @Override public Object decode(Class targetClass, Object fromDBObject, MappedField optionalExtraInfo) { if (fromDBObject == null) { ...


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This is a bug in morphia: https://github.com/mongodb/morphia/issues/641. You need to disable validation on the Query instance: query.disableValidation(); Their analysis is: "It sounds incorrect, although the query validation failures should just be in the log, not throwing an exception, so this shouldn't be a show-stopper." And as of the time of my answer, ...


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One very useful difference would be if the following two conditions applied to your scenario: You were using offset and limit in the query. You were changing values on the object such that it would no longer be returned in the query. So say you were doing a query on awesome=true, and you were using offset and limit to do multiple queries, returning 100 ...


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Both these formats are valid representations of an object id in MongoDB, according to the documentation, http://docs.mongodb.org/manual/reference/mongodb-extended-json/ and they represented differently in the two modes, Strict Mode mongo Shell Mode ----------- ---------------- { "$oid": "<id>" } ObjectId( "<id>" ) ...


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If you try something like this: query.and( query.or( query.criteria(field1).equal(value1), query.criteria(field1).doesNotExist() ), query.or( query.criteria(field2).equal(value2), query.criteria(field3).equal(value3) ) ); MongoDB/Morphia doesn't save fields with null values - it ...


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That heavily depends on the content of the string. Surnames, for example generally make a bad shard key for automatic balancing, as there is an uneven distribution of the letters surnames start with in almost every language. This problem, however, can be overcome with tag based sharding, though this requires quite a bit of knowledge and configuration when ...


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Thank you ;-), yes capped collection are quite limiting. BTW if someone couldn't find tailable iterator, maybe you are importing com.google.code.morphia (I had that error).


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Are you sure Java / Morphia is the optimal solution for this problem? Chat and any other realtime applications, are probably better served by Meteor.js and similar frameworks. Specifically, Meteor's oplog tailing would be cleverer for chats — pushing updates to the clients instead of having them pull / poll. Or in the case of tailable cursors you are not ...


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You can use a tailable cursor for that. This example is a bit old but should get you most of the way there. https://github.com/deftlabs/mongodb-examples/tree/master/mongo-java-tailable-cursor-example


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If you need to do it in an atomic fashion, change your data structure. Everything you would have inside a transaction needs to go into a single document. There's no other way to simulate transactions. If this is absolutely not possible with your data, MongoDB is the wrong tool for the job. PS: Having the datastore inside the entity is an "interesting" ...


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This should be fine in general as long as it's java.util.Date. PS: The public attributes should be made private / protected plus getters and setters.



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