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17

C++11 The difference in the behaviours in the OP between C++03 and C++11 are due to the way move assignment is implemented. There are two main options: Destroy all elements of the LHS. Deallocate the LHS's underlying storage. Move the underlying buffer (the pointers) from the RHS to the LHS. Move-assign from the elements of the RHS to the elements of the ...


13

Yes, *this is always an lvalue, no matter how a member function is called, so if you want the compiler to treat it as an rvalue, you need to use std::move or equivalent. It has to be, considering this class: struct A { void gun(); // leaves object usable void gun() &&; // makes object unusable void fun() && { gun(); gun(); } ...


11

See this answer for a detailed description of how vector move assignment must work. As you are using the std::allocator, C++11 puts you into case 2, which many on the committee considered a defect, and has been corrected to case 1 for C++14. Both case 1 and case 2 have identical run time behavior, but case 2 has additional compile-time requirements on the ...


10

In C++11 std::vector::push_back will use a move constructor if passed an rvalue (and a move constructor exists for the type), but you should also consider using std::vector::emplace_back in such situations; std::vector::emplace_back will construct the object in place rather than moving it.


8

void Foo(Bar&& b = Bar()) { /* stuff */ } That's certainly a valid use of r-value references, but it does not in any way reflect the actual semantics, and is thus "broken by design". What you want to do, is use a forwarder-function supplying the default argument like this: void Foo(Bar& b) { /* stuff */ } void Foo() { Bar b{}; Foo(b); } Or ...


7

Will c++11 smartly do the move for my temporary variable? Or, how can I make sure it is a move instead of a copy? It depends. This vec.push_back(MyStruct()); will bind to std::vector<MyStruct>::push_back(MyStruct&&); but whether the rvalue passed is moved or copied depends fully on whether MyStruct has a move copy constructor ...


6

The second version, the one taking a reference, is a tiny bit more efficient, since there's no separate object constructed for the function parameter. You would find this kind of style in generic library code where you don't want to impose any unnecessary cost on the user. The first version is a bit easier to read and to remember, and allows the slightly ...


6

When a class would be moved but for the fact that no move constructor is declared, the compiler falls back to copy constructor. In the same situation, if move constructor is declared as deleted, the program would be ill-formed. Thus, if move constructor were implicitly declared as deleted, a lot of reasonable code involving existing pre-C++11 classes would ...


6

So you have a function that takes an in-out parameter that it is going to modify to pass back information to the caller. But you want the parameter to be optional. So your solution is to make the parameter appear to be an in parameter, by requiring callers to move arguments (which would usually mean they lost whatever state they had or may be in an ...


5

You may use some wrapper with explicit name: template <typename T> class MyMove { public: explicit MyMove(T& t) : t(t) {} T& get() {return t;} private: T& t; }; template <typename T> MyMove<T> myMove(T& t) { return MyMove<T>(t); } And then class Foo { public: ...


5

Because the foo_class objects constructed in Data x{c,c+"3"}; are both temporaries. So they invoke move constructor instead of copy constructor. type constructor // 1. Construct a temporary foo_class object out of string "c" for a move constructor // 2. Move the temporary object created above to x.a destructor // 3. Destruct the temporary foo_class ...


4

Because the MyStruct() will create an rvalue the T && overload will be called. It's actually very easy to verify (demo): #include <iostream> struct A{ int x; }; void foo(A &&x){ std::cout<<"&&" <<std::endl; } void foo(A &x){ std::cout<<"&" <<std::endl; } int main() { foo(A()); // prints ...


4

You could define a type wrapping a reference, and a function to wrap it, to give something similar to move semantics at the call site. Something along the lines of template <typename T> struct move_ref { explicit move_ref(T & ref) : ref(ref) {} T & ref; }; template <typename T> move_ref<T> move(T & t) {return ...


3

What is the correct syntax for the above assignment operator? If i is const it can't be assigned, so the implementation of the assignment operator should simply return *this assignment operator should be left as implicitly delete'ed. The default, compiler-generated assignment operator performs a member-wise assignment of each non-static data member. ...


3

Sure it is possible to have move semantics in C++03. Using Boost.Move: #include <vector> #include <utility> #include <boost/move/move.hpp> class Foo { public: Foo(BOOST_RV_REF(std::vector<int>) vec) { std::swap(vec, m_vec); // "move" vec into member vector } private: std::vector<int> m_vec; }; int ...


3

No, it's NOT safe. the eval order of argument is not specified in standard. So your code can be run as: std::move(p). call move constructor of std::unique_ptr<int>. p.get() (because of 2., this will be nullptr.) and pass this parameter. call foo. You have to do like this: int *raw = p.get(); foo(raw, std::move(p)); Notice that your code can ...


3

Suppose we have a type with a mutable state. Then const&& will both allow us to mutate that state, and indicate that such mutation is safe. struct bar; struct foo { mutable std::vector<char> state; operator bar() const&; operator bar() const&&; }; const is not absolute. Barring mutable state, it is not safe to cast away ...


3

Maybe, maybe not. It's not a question of whether the compiler is smart enough, but what other special member functions you have remembered, or forgotten, to define. The exact conditions when a move constructor will be implicitly defined by the compiler are listed under ยง12.8/9 [class.copy] If the definition of a class X does not explicitly declare a move ...


3

On the usefulness of const&&... The usefulness of the const&& qualifier on the member method is minimal at best. The object cannot be modified in the same manner as a && method would allow it to be modified; it is const after all (as noted, mutable does change this). So we will not be able to rip out its guts, since the temporary is ...


3

GCC is correct (and Clang and EDG agree). myTemplate has a user-declared move constructor, therefore its copy assignment operator is deleted. You've provided a copy constructor, but not copy assignment operator. Just declare a copy assignment operator for myTemplate and define it as defaulted. That takes one extra line of code.


3

No, there's no point moving a string literal. It's a static array (not a "temporary that's constructed"), which can't be moved, only copied.


2

You are using the non-conforming C++11 stack_alloc. As Hinnant himself wrote, I've updated this article with a new allocator that is fully C++11 conforming. The allocator it replaces was not fully C++03 nor C++11 conforming because copies were not equal. The corrected version is named short_alloc and is found here. Usage requires placing the stack ...


2

When you move-construct the second container, the container move-constructs the allocator and takes over the pointers. When the second container dies, the it tries to deallocate the pointers and does it wrongly, causing UB in the pointer comparison in deallocate(). The "allocator" does not satisfy the allocator requirements, particularly: X a1(move(a)) ...


2

Here are answers about argument evaluation order - In short: the order is not specified in standard and may be different per platform, compiler and calling convention. But I wanted to test it so here are results for Cygwin GCC: #include <iostream> #include <memory> using namespace std; void print(int* p) { cout << (p == nullptr ? ...


2

Just do class mapContainer { public: mapContainer(map<int, unique_ptr<int> > smallMap) : smallMap_(std::move(smallMap)) { } private: const map<int, unique_ptr<int> > smallMap_; }; Live example


2

worker = std::thread (&Directory::working_loop,this); Here be danger when moving... The thread of execution is bound to a member function on a specific instance of on object. If the object changes location in memory, all sorts of trouble awaits your thread. Don't just move it. You don't show the implementation of the thread's function ...


1

Why does this asymmetry exist? Backward compatibility, and because the relationship between copying and moving is already asymmetrical. The definition of MoveConstructible is a special case of CopyConstructible, meaning that all CopyConstructible types are also MoveConstructible types. That's true because a copy constructor taking a reference-to-const ...


1

The body would be: A& A::operator= (A&& a) { // code to move-assign other members return *this; } It is not possible to update i in this function because i is const. I don't see what you are trying to do in example 2.


1

To remove the constness of an object, the cast to use is const_cast and not static_cast Do you want something like : template<typename T> T&& my_move(const T& t) noexcept { return std::move(const_cast<T&>(t)); } (with the possible problems to remove const from object)... Live example


1

Depending on your call hierarchy and what all those functions have to do except for passing down the object you might use another technique if you aim to store the object inside your class anyway. class A { A(const A& a) { initFrom(A(a)); // take a copy here } A(A&& a) { initFrom(std::move(a)); // move here } ...



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