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13

I was expecting a sementation fault First of all, most ways to get a segfault are as a result of undefined behaviour, in which case anything can happen and you probably shouldn't be expecting anything specific. since v_ is supposed to be moved A std::array contains its elements embedded directly inside it (not on the heap, referred to by a ...


7

What about this? template <typename T> T copy(T t) {return t;} The copy is done when you pass t by value and a following move take place. http://coliru.stacked-crooked.com/a/cbc1a161f65a022b If you can modify your function to: void func(A) {} then you can do int main() { A a; func(a); //copies func(std::move(a)); //moves ...


7

You're asking the wrong question: std::move does nothing, so it doesn't matter that the function arguments aren't evaluated in a specified order. What matters is that foo1.id() is invoked before the call to emplace, which moves from the reference to foo1 provided by std::move. That is the case - function calls are always sequenced after the evaluation of ...


6

It is not obvious that an object is not going to be used after a given point. For instance, have a look at the following variant of your code: struct Bar { ~Bar() { std::cout << str.size() << std::endl; } std::string& str; } Bar make_bar(std::string& str) { return Bar{ str }; } void foo (std::string str) { // do sth. with str } ...


6

Here is some example simplified to the extreme: #include <iostream> #include <vector> template<typename T> T&& my_move(T& t) { return static_cast<T&&>(t); } int main() { std::vector<bool> v{true}; std::move(v[0]); // std::move on rvalue, OK my_move(v[0]); // my_move on rvalue, OOPS } ...


6

The explicit destructor declaration (and definition) suppresses the implicit declaration of the move constructor and the move assignment operator. Thus the only thing that can be used is the copy constructor (which is implicitly declared no matter what) - but it's defined as deleted because unique_ptrs are not copyable. Hence the error. Explicitly default ...


5

What you are missing is that Stroustroup provides a free-function swap(TestA&, TestA&) in the same namespace as the class. Also, he does not call it as std::swap (neither does your code), but uses an unqualified id and injection of std::swap into the namespace with using ::std::swap;. Which means the generic version provided by the standard is not ...


5

Why the code works: The scope of vec is the body of fillVector. Inside this entire scope, vec is perfectly valid. This includes the call to setVector. v (the parameter of setVector) is a reference which binds to vec. The body of setVector copies the contents of the vector vec (accessed as v) into v_. That's an actual copy of data, no reference assignment. ...


4

template<class T> std::remove_cv_t<T> copy(T& t) { return t; } template<class T> void copy(T&&)=delete; // block rvalue copy template<class T, size_t N> void copy(T(&)[N]) = delete; // we can implement this if we want: see below will copy any lvalue. On rvalues and non-copyable types (like arrays) it will fail to ...


4

No, it's not implicit, but explicit. Also in C++11 21.4/5 is basic_string(basic_string&& str) noexcept;


3

Since C++11, having a container of only default constructible objects is perfectly legal, provided that you do not use any operation that requires the object to be copyable or movable. However, std::initializer_list allows only const access to its elements, meaning that you can't move from them. Hence vector<Test> v = { Test(), Test() }; would ...


3

By-value parameters aren't subject to NRVO (Why are by-value parameters excluded from NRVO?) so they are moved instead (Are value parameters implicitly moved when returned by value?) A fairly simple solution is to take both parameters by const reference and copy within the function body: Foo operator+(Foo const& rhs) const { cout << "Summing ...


2

You need to move the pointer. forward_list(forward_list&& other) : root_(std::move(other.root_)), leaf_(std::move(other.leaf_)), count_(other.count_), heap(other.heap) { // Do nothing }


2

As long as you are accessing the value m by name, this can never be an r-value without casting. You could however add a member function which "moves" the member value out of your object. using IntPtr = std::unique_ptr<int>; class X { IntPtr m; public: X(); IntPtr getM() { return std::move(m); } }


2

If you really want to do this with the type system, it is always possible to encode extra information using your own type. template<class T> struct invalidates_contained_pointers; template<class T> invalidates_contained_pointers<T>* contents_will_be_invalidated(T* ptr) { return ...


2

How about void f(vector<void*> v); And to use it: vector<void*> myVec = /*...*/; f(std::move(myVec)); If f logically needs ownership of a vector, this is the idiomatic way. It allows the caller to decide whether to move or copy a vector to f. If the caller actually wants f to modify his vector (so the vector is actually an in/out argument) ...


2

If you want to get rid of temporaries, I suggest you use the following implementation: Foo operator+(const Foo& rhs) const { cout << "Summing Foo objects" << endl; Foo result(rhs); result += *this; return result; } which allows the NRVO to be applied. Your second version might be optimized away by a "Sufficiently Smart ...


2

StringPointerWrapper spw5(StringPointerWrapper("String for move constructor")); This invokes the default constructor because the compiler has decided to optimize this by not creating a temporary (i.e., it has decided to do StringPointerWrapper spw5("String for move constructor")). Instead force a move by performing StringPointerWrapper ...


2

The move constructors are not being called because the compiler is eliding the constructor as an optimization. If you pass -fno-elide-constructors in your compiler invocation, you can disable this. However, you have issues because your move constructor is just using the pointer from other, which is deleted soon after. It doesn't really make sense to hold ...


2

Returning Foo is potentially expensive, and impossible if the type isn't copyable. It's also surprising: (a=b)=c would create a temporary and assign c to that, when you'd expect both assignments to be to a. Returning Foo&& is just weird; you don't want things mysteriously turning into rvalues so that e.g. f(a=b) unexpectedly moves from a without you ...


2

The std::unique_pointer<Sniffer> is a temporary in your "1", so is destroyed after the statement completes. Its destructor destroys the Sniffer object, before the next statement (h();) is reached. h is a dangling reference, so the result of h() (i.e. h.operator()()) is undefined. In your case "2", the object p continues to exist until the end ...


1

Yes it would be meaningful. It means you move from value in case you have it. However, it surprises me that you return as optional, when it appears that semantically the class already contains an optional value (value_available is the indicator of that). So, instead I'd suggest to store value as optional<T> already and just return that return value; ...


1

It would only be meaningful if you only need to call getValue() once, or if ownsership transfer semantics apply, as it destroys value after the first call.


1

Its all sums up on what you define by "Destroyed"? std::string has no special effect for self-destroying but deallocating the char array which hides inside. what if my destructor DOES something special? for example - doing some important logging? then by simply "moving it because it's not needed anymore" I miss some special behavior that the destructor ...


1

I agree with your analysis, and in fact the libstdc++ Debug Mode has an assertion that will fire on self-swap of standard containers: #include <vector> #include <utility> struct S { std::vector<int> v; }; int main() { S s; std::swap(s, s); } The wrapper type S is needed because swapping vector directly uses the specialization ...


1

f should clear the vector if it is deleting the pointers (or freeing whatever they are handles to). It is just pointlessly dangerous to leave the caller with a vector of intederminate values. So f should accept the vector by non-const reference. Whether you want to make this lvalue reference or rvalue reference is up to you; but the lvalue version seems ...


1

As others have said, the type system doesn't allow you to indicate something like "don't use this data after this function call". What you could do: void f(vector<void*> &v) { // ... use v ... v.clear(); // encourage callers not to use the pointers after the call }


1

The short answer: there is no way to do this. The only thing that is 'official' is the inverse: there is a signature that promises that a function f(..) will NOT change its arguments: the const keyword. Typically one adheres to the following: functions that do not modify their arguments either get their arguments as copy-by-value or mark their arguments ...


1

The problem is that you expected a segmentation fault just because you accessed memory that is no longer yours. Undefined behaviour means anything can happen. In this instance, the state of v is unspecified, so your accesses to three elements of it may be valid or may not be. When they are valid (which they probably are because the underlying data is ...


1

It doesn't hurt. You're simply establishing a guarantee that code will treat the result as an rvalue. You certainly could write std::move in such way that it errors out when dealing with something that's already an rvalue, but what is the benefit? In generic code, where you don't necessarily know what type(s) you're going to be working with, what gains in ...



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