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14

Is it a good idea to try and avoid const on returned locals, or is there a better way to deal with this? Yes. In fact if resource_ptr is a move-only type, you will get a compile-time error if you try to return one which is const. This is an example of where "tried-and-true" C++98/03 advice no longer applies in C++11 and forward.


11

That's because you are not actually "stealing", you're just copying, and so you'll delete 2 times the same pointer, as you noticed. To actually "steal" the data, set the original data to nullptr, as it no longer belongs to that object. A(A&& t) : name("move") { data = t.data; t.data = nullptr; //'t' doesn't own its data anymore cout<&...


7

Yes, moved-from objects are destructed. They remain in an undetermined but valid state. They're still objects. It's best if you recall that C++ doesn't actually move anything. std::move just gives you an rvalue. So-called "move constructors" are just convenient alternatives to copy constructors, found during lookup when you have an rvalue, and allowing you ...


7

So, moving out of a Box is a special case... now what? The std::mem module presents a number of safe functions to move values around, without poking holes (!) into the memory safety of Rust. Of interest here are swap and replace: pub fn replace<T>(dest: &mut T, src: T) -> T Which we can use like so: fn baz(mut abox: Box<Foo>) -> ...


5

std::move doesn't actually move anything, it just casts to an rvalue to allow moving (bit of a misnomer, but hey, we're stuck with it now). If you were to do an actual move construction, you'd most likely see an exception from the bounds-checked std::vector::at. void f(S && s) { S steal = std::move(s); std::cout << " from f: " <&...


4

Moving out of boxes is special-cased in the compiler. You can move something out of them, but you can't move something back in, because the act of moving out also deallocates. You can do something silly with std::ptr::write, std::ptr::read, and std::ptr::replace, but it's hard to get it right, because something valid should be inside a Box when it is dropped....


3

String literal "str" has type const char[4]. The most appropriate function for this argument is the template function because it does not require a conversion to std::string.


3

When you make a new copy from a const-reference that can't be a move, obviously. If you want to write these functions in a way where the vector gets moved in and out of them, you need to transfer the vectors by value (should be preferred here) or rvalue-reference, and move the vector into the function. #include <cstdio> #include <vector> std::...


3

I'm not sure why the memory address of the first element is the same after calling abs(), but there is a better way to write it. The code would be simpler if you use std::transform(), available in the algorithm header: std::vector<float> abs(const std::vector<float> &v) { std::vector<float> abs_vec; std::transform(v.begin(), v....


3

Is this a standard-compliant implementation, to ignore the moving of data? The standard says for that insert() function: Requires: value_type shall be EmplaceConstructible into X from *i. So it must be possible to construct the value_type from the iterator's reference type, which in this case is an rvalue-reference. That means you can use move-only (...


2

Try with adapter b {implementation()}; The problem was that adapter b(implementation()); wasn't interpreted (if I'm not wrong) as instantiation of an object of type adapter but was interpreted as a declaration of a function of name b that receive an object of type implementation takes a single (unnamed) parameter which is also a function, returning ...


2

The value you printf is the address of the underlying data member of the vector. So I suppose that, in your case 1) the creation of tmp create (allocate) a data member in position 0x156dc20 2) the normalize() operation substitute the data member with the data member of the vector created in normalize() (norm_vec), with address 0x156e050, and free the ...


2

void test(MyClass&& temp) { MyClass a(MyClass{}); // calls MOVE constructor as expected MyClass b(temp); // calls COPY constructor... not expected...? } That is because, temp (since it has a name,) is an lvalue reference to an rvalue. To treat as an rvalue at any point, call on std::move void test(MyClass&& temp) { MyClass a(...


2

The swap called inside iter_swap is not fully qualified i.e not called as std::swap but just as swap. Therefore, during name lookup and ADL compiler finds multiple functions which matches with the call to swap. But, the overload resolution selects the swap provided by you since it matches best. If you use swap in your main code, then it would compile fine ...


1

Prevoiusly I thought that it's a C char[] string converted to std::string when it is needed Close. It's a const char [] converted to std::string when it is needed. The lame part: what type of argument should a function take to be able to deal with calls like fun("str")? You can use std::string. You can use const char (&) [N]. You can use const ...


1

There is a lot more to the expression template technique than mere avoidance of copying. For example, the compiler can do symbolic linear algebra to transform entire expressions into more efficiently executing code. Many of these transformations have nothing to do with avoiding copies.


1

std::move does not move anything - it only returns an xvalue referenceing the same object that can be bound to an rvalue so that a moving ctor or moving operator= can be invoked. So in your code no move is ever done - f just operates on an rvalue reference to the same object. If f accepted S by value then there would be a move and you would see the i being ...


1

Depending on what type you want to store in the priority queue, an alternative to Angew's solution, that avoids the const_cast and removes some of the opportunities for shooting oneself in the foot, would be to wrap the element type as follows: struct Item { mutable MyClass element; int priority; // Could be any less-than-comparable type. // ...



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