Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

8

With a few exceptions (smart pointers, for instance), moved-from objects are left in a valid but unspecified state. In a std::string that uses the small string optimization, for instance, if the string is small, there is no dynamic allocation, and a move is a copy. In that case it is perfectly valid for the implementation to leave the source string ...


6

This is a missing feature on GCC : see bug 54316 , it has been fixed (you can thank Jonathan Wakely) for the next versions (gcc 5) Clang with libc++ compiles this code : int main () { std::stringstream stream("1234"); std::stringstream stream2 = std::move(std::stringstream("5678")); return 0; } Live demo And it also compiles the example with ...


5

There is a recent proposal for movable initializer lists, where, in particular, the authors say: std::initializer_list was designed around 2005 (N1890) to 2007 (N2215), before move semantics matured, around 2009. At the time, it was not anticipated that copy semantics would be insufficient or even suboptimal for common value-like classes. There was a ...


4

good (if unfortunate) answer by Anton. Here's the source code of the implementation in libc++: template <class _Tp, class _Allocator> inline _LIBCPP_INLINE_VISIBILITY vector<_Tp, _Allocator>::vector(initializer_list<value_type> __il) { #if _LIBCPP_DEBUG_LEVEL >= 2 __get_db()->__insert_c(this); #endif if (__il.size() > 0) ...


4

An rvalue reference is (surprise:) a reference indeed. You can move from it, but std::move does not move. So, if you don't move from it, you'll actually operate on the rvalue object (through the rvalue reference). The usual pattern would be void foo(X&& x) { X mine(std::move(x)); // x will not be affected anymore } However, when you ...


3

This code outputs false true false true on both GCC 4.9 and clang 3.5 with or without exceptions enabled: void foo() {} void bar() noexcept {} void foo2() noexcept(noexcept(foo())) {} void bar2() noexcept(noexcept(bar())) {} int main() { std::cout << std::boolalpha << noexcept(foo()) << ' ' << noexcept(bar()) << ' ...


3

From http://en.cppreference.com/w/cpp/utility/move ...all standard library functions that accept rvalue reference parameters (such as std::vector::push_back) are guaranteed to leave the moved-from argument in valid but unspecified state.


3

Interesting. I think it's safe, for convoluted reasons. (For the record, I also consider it very bad style -- an explicit copy costs you nothing here, since it will be moved into the map.) First of all, the actual function call is not a problem. std::move only casts a to an rvalue reference, and rvalue references are just references; a is not immediately ...


3

What happens when you call m.emplace(a.s, std::move(a)); is that you are passing an l-value reference to a.s and an r-value reference to a to the emplace function. Whether this is safe depends on the implementation of that function. If it first rips the guts out of the second argument and then tries to use the first argument, you'll likely have a problem. If ...


3

There are two copies in C++03 and two moves in C++11. In both C++03 and C++11 the copy/moves are subject to elision, and as such (in an example like this) no copy/move is likely to happen. vector<int> myVector() { vector<int> res; res.push_back(4); res.push_back(5); return res;// <- Here we construct the return value with res } // ...


2

Yes, both of the std::moves are needed to ensure the move constructor gets invoked. The simple rule of thumb is "If it has a name, it is an lvalue." The only exception is when you are returning an automatic duration object which is about to go out of scope - this object is treated as an xvalue and is preferentially binds to the move constructor.


2

std::pair<bool, StringWrapper> foo() { std::string someStdString; // ... someStdString is filled here. ... return {true, std::move(someStdString)}; } I see little reason to include most of your code, let alone two moves. A std::make_pair if you want to be explicit about returning a pair, or are in a half compliant compiler. As written above, ...


2

The move operations on unique pointers basically boil down to simple pointer copies. There is no reason why any implementation of unique_ptr would dereference the pointers in the process of moving them. Therefore, the likelihood that this operation is responsible for the seg-fault is virtually zero. In your return-statement / constructor-call, you do have ...


2

What you're doing is: map<string,Elem> m; m["file1"] = // this default-constructs an Elem // and returns a reference to it in the correct spot move(Elem("file1")); // and THEN move-assigns it What you need to do: map<string, Elem> m; m.emplace("file1", Elem("file1")); or ...


2

The built-in = operator, when used as a = b, has well-documented long-standing behaviour of reading b's value, and storing it in a. There is nothing in the standard that suggests that integer assignment modifies the assignment RHS. 5.17 Assignment and compound assignment operators [expr.ass] ... 2 In simple assignment (=), the value of the ...


2

I can't read the minds of Herb, Andrei or Scott. (Aside: none of these guys -- all very talented -- had anything at all to do with the Apollo space program (the background in their video)). However I can add some insight into rvalue-reference/move-semantics. If you have a pure factory function like: vector<BigData> GetVector(int someIndex) { ...


2

When you write value = std::move(other.value); you should understand that std::move does not move anything. It just converts its parameter to a rvalue reference, then, if the left hand side has a move constructor/assignment operator, the left hand side deals with it (and how to actually move the object). For plain old types (PODs), std::move doesn't really ...


1

Compare these two functions: void Bar(Foo&& x) { std::cout << "# " << x.value << std::endl; } vs. void Bar(Foo&& x) { std::cout << "# " << x.value << std::endl; Foo y=std::move(x); } Both take an rvalue reference, but only the second calls the move constructor. Consequently, the output of ...


1

May be, this link will be useful In short, for reuse you need to call .clear method


1

PODs don't really move, they copy (or, their copy and move is the same operation, as there is nothing to really "move" in that case) - see here.


1

Moving a value is a mutating operation. Mutating requires exclusive access in order to not have a data race. Therefore the caller should already hold the lock. The caller that passes the object as a rvalue knows it's going to be mutated (or at least promises that it's okay for the receiving function to do so). REALITY: None of this is likely to happen. ...


1

Depends on how you define the moved-out state of your ThreadsafeQueue. I see two reasonable common ways: Moved-out queue is empty, and it's OK to push new items into it and so on. Then the answer to your question is yes. I personally prefer this in most cases. Moved-out queue is left in unspecified state and can be destructed or assigned to only. Then the ...


1

std::move(lvalue or xvalue) does not call a destructor. It just changes the passed reference to an rvalue-reference, so move-semantics apply. So, why is your local destroyed too early? Simple, returning a reference to a local variable is UB: Can a local variable's memory be accessed outside its scope? Going over your named constructors one-by-one: ...


1

The source text rhs refers to two different things here: The variable rhs, an rvalue-reference to an outer object. This variable has type outer&&. The expression rhs that evaluates the value of that variable. This expression has type outer and value category lvalue. The lvalue/rvalue-ness of a reference variable determines to which value ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible