Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

16

From the standard Ch. 12 - Special member functions Par 12.8 Copying and moving class objects (emphasis mine) 9 . If the definition of a class X does not explicitly declare a move constructor, one will be implicitly declared as defaulted if and only if — X does not have a user-declared copy constructor, — X does not have a user-declared copy ...


10

Nikos Athanasiou gave a good answer but I wanted to add this tool that I think is very useful. Here is a screenshot of Howard Hinnant's presentation "Everything You Ever Wanted To Know About Move Semantics (and then some)" from ACCU 2014 conference which I think is a very good reminder of the rules of automatic generation of special members: ...


8

You can use reference collapsing and std::forward to forward the argument to the foo function: template <typename T> /* ... */ bar(T&& t) { foo(std::forward<T>(t)); } Please notice that your foo function will accept rvalues, constant lvalues and non-const lvalues. As an example, given: const int x = 456; int y = 123; then: ...


8

Yes, using braced-init-list return for direct initialization of the target object: struct FooFactory { Foo MakeFoo() { return {++counter}; } // ... }; Note that this will not work if the 1-argument constructor of Foo is explicit. 6.6.3 [stmt.return]: [...] A return statement with a braced-init-list initializes the object or reference to ...


7

Here are some of the differences between move constructors and other constructors: Move constructors can be defaulted Move constructors don't prevent a type from being a "literal type" Non-trivial move constructors prevent a type from being a "trivially copyable type" Move constructors prevent the implicit move constructor from being generated Move ...


7

The compiler is eliding the move construction and directly constructing X(3) into c, essentially turning your initialization into X c(3); With gcc, you can disable this using the -fno-elide-constructors switch. Once you add that, the output from your original example is as expected: Constructor Copy Constructor Move Live demo


6

There are two moves that could happen in your program: From the function to the return object. From the return object to model. Both of these moves can be elided by the compiler for the same reason: when a temporary class object that has not been bound to a reference (12.2) would be copied/moved to a class object with the same cv-unqualified type, ...


4

data isn't already pointing at anything because this is the constructor. This is the first thing that happens when the object is created. When constructing this object, it takes ownership of that.data which was allocated by the other object. By assigning 0 to that.data, it ensures that the other object won't delete the data. Now this object is responsible ...


4

§17.6.4.9: Each of the following applies to all arguments to functions defined in the C++ standard library, unless explicitly stated otherwise. [...] If a function argument binds to an rvalue reference parameter, the implementation may assume that this parameter is a unique reference to this argument. [ Note: If the parameter is a generic ...


4

If created at all (consider optimizations), they're in automatic storage. I.e. the stack.


3

I've made some changes to your code which may help you understand and explore how this all works. I added an id element to each Temp object to make it easier to understand which object is which and also changed the signature of the operator= to return a reference rather than an object. First, here is the required include to make it into a complete program: ...


2

You're violating the convention (which is a requirement for calls to library functions) that rvalue references do not alias. Howard Hinnant's answer, referred to in the question, contains the standard text and the application to self-move. Here's the practical result: It's both legal and common to implement move-assignment as: T& ...


2

Your function id2 does nothing, the code is equivalent to a = std::move(a); The answer from Howard Hinnant you linked explains that this is in itself not allowed. In layman's terms: The standard does not require self-move assignment to be supported. Thus an implementation of a move-assignment operator is not required to perform a test for self-assignment ...


2

The C++ standard unfortunately does not have any special rule to resolve this particular ambiguity. The problem come from the fact that you are trying to overload on 2 different things: the type that the compiler is trying to convert to; and the kind of reference from which you are trying to convert from. By introducing proxy classes, you can split the ...


2

I think this is due to: MyClass(const MyClass&& other) : ^^^^^ Since the the object bound to other cannot be changed via this reference, the effect of the intended move operation turns out to just be a copy. If I delete this const then the behaviour changes back to what you expected: $ g++ -o tm3 tm3.cc -std=c++11 && ./tm3 c1: ...


2

Is string::swap ignorable? You may choose to ignore it if you wish to, and always call non-member swap; the effect will be identical to calling string::swap because the swap specialization for basic_string is described in terms of the member function. §21.4.8.8 [string.special] template<class charT, class traits, class Allocator> void ...


1

You are a "victim" of Return Value Optimization here. Note this: "In C++, it is particularly notable for being allowed to change the observable behaviour of the resulting program". EDIT: Hence, the compiler is allowed to apply the optimization, even though the side effects of the move-ctor (cout) have been changed.


1

Calling move(b) returns an rvalue. Both operator=(thing &&x) and operator=(thing x) can accept rvalues as input. As such, the two overloads are ambiguous and the compiler rightfully complains because it can't choose between them.


1

Deprecating anything is more or less a lost cause. For backwards compatibility compiler vendors can't really get rid of anything -- or a valued customer is sure to complain.



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible