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12

And obviously I do need to either delete or properly implement it, as I've just learned the hard way. No you don't. Your class has a user-defined copy constructor, copy assignment operator and destructor, so the compiler will not define a move assignment operator for you. So just stop trying to delete it, and the class will be copied instead of moved. ...


10

Types leaving moved-from objects in "empty" state are smart pointers, locks ([thread.lock.unique.cons]/21, [thread.lock.shared.cons]/21), file streams ([filebuf.cons]/(4.2)), futures ([futures.unique_future]/(8.2), [futures.shared_future]/10), promises ([futures.promise]/6), packaged tasks ([futures.task]/7), threads ([thread.thread.constr]/10), … By ...


10

The move constructor is not implicitly declared, because you have a user-declared destructor (see [class.copy]/(9.4)). However, the copy constructor is clearly deleted, since unique_ptr can't be copied. You can explicitly declare the move constructor as defaulted.


9

Hell no. The expression is, yes, equivalent to (bar.operator[](baz)).operator=(std::move(baz)) But there is no guaranteed order between the evaluation of (bar.operator[](baz)).operator= - formally, the postfix-expression designating the function to be called - and the evaluation of the initialization of the argument to operator=, which is what moves from ...


6

A rule of thumb As a rule of thumb: The move-only types or types with shared reference semantics leave their moved-from object in an empty state. All other types leave unspecified values. Move-only types Move-only types (which leave moved-from objects in an empty state) are std::unique_lock, std::thread, std::promise, std::packaged_task, std::future, ...


5

Make the move constructor default, i.e. Log(Log&&) = default; because otherwise the existence of a user-provided copy ctor (even if deleted) disables the move ctor. You should also return log; instead of return move(log);, as the default move ctor will be invoked (since the copy ctor is deleted). See e.g. this for more details on why return move ...


5

Because the class contains a std::unique_ptr member the compiler can't generate a copy-constructor like it would normally do, which means your declaration and initialization (which invokes the copy-constructor) will not be possible. You could solve it by making a move constructor for your class and mark it as default.


5

Because that's how the std::string move constructor is implemented. It takes ownership of the old string's contents (i.e. the dynamically-allocated char array), leaving the old string with nothing. Your mstring class, on the other hand, doesn't actually implement move semantics. It has a move constructor, but all it does is copy the string using ...


5

You may want to use std::integer_sequence It is available from C++14 but can be implemented with C++11 : https://github.com/serge-sans-paille/pythran/blob/master/pythran/pythonic/include/utils/seq.hpp Thanks to this, you need an extra function but you avoid this repetition : void unroll( SomeTuple &t ) { someFunction( std::get<0>( std::move( ...


5

Iterator has a cloned method which is equivalent to .map(|x| x.clone()) which, in case of Copy types is equivalent to .map(|&x| x). This way you can write channels.iter().cloned().flat_map(char::to_uppercase).collect()


4

None of them. I'd use this: struct B { A && get() && { return std::move(m_a); } }; That way you can only "take" from rvalues of B: B b; A a = std::move(b).get();


2

You can define a function that takes a reference. You can even put it inside another function, if you want to keep it close to its usage. fn foobar() { fn to_uppercase(c: &char) -> ::std::char::ToUppercase { c.to_uppercase() } // [...] let channels_upper = channels.iter().flat_map(to_uppercase).collect(); }


2

Since unique_ptr is a move-only type, returning by value will (hypothetically) call the move constructor for the returned value. But since being moved from is a destructive operation, you can't really move from a const object. But I think C++17's "guaranteed copy elision" (http://www.open-std.org/jtc1/sc22/wg21/docs/papers/2015/p0135r0.html) would help with ...


2

I think such a change would be a bad idea. I sort of see where you are coming from but your solution to your problem would simply create a new problem that is currently solved. I think we need to consider why we make objects const to begin with. Its about safety and making sure the wrong thing does not happen to a given variable. By making a unique_ptr ...


1

You can simply do the following, which creates a Person pointer and assign it to the unique_ptr: class Life { public: Life(int age) : person_(new Person(age)) {} ...


1

The most efficient method is to have the operating system map the file to memory. Search your OS API for "mmap" or "memory mapping". Another approach is to seek to the end of the file and get the position (tellg()). This is the size of the file. Allocate an array in dynamic memory or create a std::vector reserving at least this amount of space. Some ...


1

I think all answers completely failed to answer the original question. First, as stated above, the question is only relevant for structs. Classes have no meaningful move. Also stated above, for structs, a certain amount of move will happen automatically by the compiler under certain conditions. If you wish to get control over the move operations, here's ...


1

Semantically, you can't avoid the std::move. To get an rvalue, you need to either not have a name for something (so you can't refer to it twice) or strip the name with std::move. And t has a name, but to pass a unique_ptr to a function call, you need it to not have a name. You can see this for example by changing unroll to the (more idiomatic?) void ...



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