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6

The short version is set::begin() returns a const_iterator while map::begin() returns an iterator. You cannot move from a const_iterator. The long version is that the "Key" component of associative containers are treated as const within the container. A set contains nothing but a Key component. A map contains both a Key component and a Value component. ...


5

It is well defined because it doesn't matter what comes first in this code: You can rewrite it to the following equivalent hash_map[object.key()] = static_cast<objecttype&&>(object); What can we say about the code: object.key() should be executed before assignment to the map std::move(object) should be executed before assignment to the ...


5

std::move leaves the moved-from object in a valid but unspecified state. In particular it might stay exactly the way it was before, so while this might actually work with your implementation of the stl, it will certainly not work for all third-party containers. (And might break at any point in the future when your implementation of the stl changes due to an ...


5

A user-declared destructor suppresses the implicit generation of move special member functions ([class.copy]/p9, 20). Thus, C only has a copy constructor and a copy assignment operator; the latter is used to perform the "move" assignment, and presumably could throw.


4

Nothing. std::move does not move a thing. It simply casts (converts) the object to an rvalue reference, which can be seen by looking at a typical implementation : template <typename T> typename remove_reference<T>::type&& move(T&& arg) { return static_cast<typename remove_reference<T>::type&&>(arg); } ...


3

explicit Trade(vecstr_t&& vec) : _vec(vec) {} In the constructor above, even though vec is of type rvalue reference to vecstr_t, it is itself an lvalue. The basic rule to remember is - if it has a name, it's an lvalue. There are very few contexts where an lvalue may automatically be moved from (such as the return statement of a function that ...


3

I wouldn't recommend this. First, it obscures the intention. Either use c.clear or c.erase(c.begin(), c.end()). A container without a way to erase/remove elements is not a proper dynamically sized container. Also your proposed solution depends on the move constructor of the specific container type, which is implementation defined, no memory must be freed. ...


3

Never mark your copy constructor or move constructor as explicit. It isn't illegal. It is just unusual enough to be confusing. There is no benefit to it, and only downside. The explicit on your move constructor is the cause of this error.


2

The vector can have its memory released: void putOnFire() { books.clear(); books.shrink_to_fit(); } If you are working with some container that is not a standard container then you'll have to consult its documentation to see what operations it supports. Writing code that anticipates a container with an unknown interface is just not possible.


2

The moves have no effect because Card has no move constructor or move assignment operator. The vectors deck1 and deck2 contain copies of whatever is pushed into them. But the problem (or at least, one problem) is that you invalidate p when you erase from deck1. De-referencing p is undefined behaviour (UB). deck1.push_back(move(card)); Card* p = ...


1

Say core_data.swap(temp_data).


1

AFAIK copy elision is always optional. Standard just explicitly say that compiler is allowed to make such optimization, because it changes the observable behaviour, it does not mandate it. Specifically 12.8 p. 31: When certain criteria are met, an implementation is allowed to omit the copy/move construction of a class object, even if the constructor ...



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