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19

Is it legal C++ to use this function as follows? Yes, that's fine. If I remember correctly, there is a C/C++ rule that forbids modifying an object more than once in a single full expression. Not quite. You can't modify an object more than once (or modify it and use its value) with unsequenced accesses. Does this rule apply here? No. ...


12

In this example, there is no difference. We will end up with 3 ints with value 100. There could definitely be a difference with different types though. For instance, let's consider something like vector<int>: std::vector<int> a = {1, 2, 3, 4, 5}; // a has size 5 auto a_copy = a; // copy a. now we have two vectors of size 5 ...


7

Using std::move just changes an lvalue to an xvalue, so it is eligible for use with move constructors and move assignment operators. These do not exist for built-in types, so using move makes no difference in this example.


7

When you comment out both the lines that explicitly default and delete the copy constructor, the compiler is free to implicitly generate a move constructor (and move assignment operator) for you. By explicitly defaulting or deleteing the copy constructor, you suppress the implicit generation of the move constructor. From N3337, §12.8/9 [class.copy] If ...


6

No it's not. This: Tuple&& Foo::move_data() { return std::move( Tuple(a_, b_, c_) ); } would copy your elements into a Tuple, and then move the Tuple itself... not your elements. What you want to do is move them into the Tuple, and then return it by value: Tuple Foo::move_data() { return Tuple(std::move(a_), std::move(b_), std::move(c_) ...


5

It's not valid: What if this move assignment is called as part of moving a child object? Then you destroy the child (assuming it has a virtual destructor) and recreate in its place a parent object. I would say that even in a non-virtual context it's still a bad idea because you don't see the syntax very often and it may make the code harder to grok for ...


4

Okay, here is a solution that I think will work as you want it but I must admit that I don't fully understand how it does so. The most important change I've made was to replace std::move with std::forward<T> in the move constructor. I have also added a move assignment operator but here is the thing I don't understand: Unless everywhere else, it needs ...


4

What's difference between default copy and std::move in that example? There is no difference. Copying something satisfies the requirements of a move, and in the case of built-in types, move is implemented as a copy. After move the object is there any dependence between new and old No, there are no dependencies. Both variables are independent.


3

To expand on the other poster's answer, the move-is-a-copy paradigm applies to all data structures composed of POD types (or composed of other types composed of POD types) as well, as in this example: struct Foo { int values[100]; bool flagA; bool flagB; }; struct Bar { Foo foo1; Foo foo2; }; int main() { Foo f; Foo fCopy = ...


2

After moving from the standard C++ library classes, they are in an unspecified state but otherwise entirely usable. The relevant section is 17.6.5.15 [lib.types.movedfrom]: Objects of types defined in the C++ standard library may be moved from (12.8). Move operations may be explicitly specified or implicitly generated. Unless otherwise specified, such ...


2

It may be valid(1). To address your specific issue about dtor/ctor lifetimes, yes that is valid(2). That is how the original implementation for vector worked. It may be a good idea (it probably isn't), but you may not want a canonical way.(3) (1) There is controversy about whether or moves need to be valid in the self-move case. Arguing for self-move ...


2

The actual character data is not in the std::vector itself, but somewhere else in the heap. A std::string only contains some housekeeping variables and a pointer to the character data. Thus, by moving those variables, the new std::string instances in the reallocated std::vector can steal the data pointers from the original std::string instances without ...


2

The character data is not stored in the actual std::string object itself, but is stored elsewhere in memory that the std::string points at. So your std::vector really looks more like this instead: [data1a] [data2a] [data3a] ^ ^ ^ | | | VecA:[|string1a|string2a|string3a|...] When using copy semantics, ...


2

If your question had been about move construction of a vector, the answer would be easy, the source vector is left empty after the move. This is because of the requirement in Table 99 — Allocator-aware container requirements Expression: X(rv) X u(rv) Requires: move construction of A shall not exit via an exception. post: u shall ...


1

The move is elided; that's an optimisation allowed in various situations, even if (as here) the move constructor has side effects, so that omitting the call changes the program's behaviour. Specifically, when the program uses a temporary (or a local variable, when returning from a function) to directly initialise an object of the same type, that move can be ...


1

The state of the moved-from vector is unspecified but valid after the move, as you found out. This means that it could really be in any valid state, in particular you can't assume that its capacity will be 0. It will probably be zero, and that would make a lot of sense, but that's not at all guaranteed. But again, in practice if you don't care all that ...


1

Because the strings themselves contain pointers to data in yet more buffers! A:[|||\] ||\ [String3] |\ [String2] | [String1] [String0] B:[....] //uninitialized If you copy all of the strings in A, they will in turn make copies of those other four buffers. However, if you move the strings to B, then they'll just shift the ownership of the ...


1

Shamed into looking this up by dyp's helpful comment, it is indeed undefined behavior whether !func will be true or not after auto foo = std::move(func) (or any other move-from on the object). The relevant text from the C++11 spec: (6) effects: If !f, *this has no target; otherwise, move-constructs the target of f into the target of *this, leaving f in a ...



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