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17

In theory, this can print any of 131, 13313, 1313, and 1331. It's pretty silly as a quiz question. f("hello");: "hello" is converted to a temporary X via the converting constructor, prints 1. The temporary X is used to initialize the function argument, calls the move constructor, prints 3. This can be elided. x is used to initialize the temporary return ...


8

Option #1 SFINAE hidden in a template parameter list: #include <type_traits> template <typename T , typename = typename std::enable_if<!std::is_lvalue_reference<T>{}>::type> void f(T&& v) { } template <typename T> void f(const T& v) { } DEMO 1 Option #2 SFINAE hidden in return type syntax: ...


6

My original answer was wrong, so I'm starting over. In [class.copy], we have: A defaulted copy/ move constructor for a class X is defined as deleted (8.4.3) if X has: — [...] — a potentially constructed subobject type M (or array thereof) that cannot be copied/moved because overload resolution (13.3), as applied to M’s corresponding ...


6

No. The buffer that std::string manages is private to it. You can access it via &str[0], but the string will still own it and will destroy it when it goes out of scope. You have no way of telling str that it now owns a different buffer, or to set its underlying buffer to nullptr, or any other way of making it not delete that buffer. That's ...


6

An rvalue reference is still a reference, your code is incorrect for the same reason as the function shown below std::string& test() { std::string m="Hello"; return m; } In both cases, the function returns a reference to a local variable. std::move doesn't do anything other than cast m to string&&, so there is no temporary created that ...


6

Move semantics don't just magically make your code faster. With them, calling a function like void bar(string s) is faster than it would be if you had to copy your arguments, but only in the case where the argument can be moved. Consider this case: std::string prompt(std::string prompt_text); void askOnce(std::string question) { prompt(question); } void ...


5

Are STL containers in C++11 all support move semantics? Yes. If so, does following code have the same performance as const &? No, if the argument is an lvalue. If the argument is an rvalue, the performance is at least as good. In the case of an lvalue, the argument has to be copied. There's no way around that. The function signature ...


4

There might actually be a good reason for this. &mut T isn't actually a type: all borrows are parametrized by some (potentially inexpressible) lifetime. When one writes fn move_try(val: &mut ()) { { let new = val; } *val } fn main() { move_try(&mut ()); } the type inference engine infers typeof new == typeof val, so they share ...


4

How about a second level of implementation: #include <utility> #include <type_traits> // For when f is called with an rvalue. template <typename T> void f_impl(T && t, std::false_type) { /* ... */ } // For when f is called with an lvalue. template <typename T> void f_impl(T & t, std::true_type) { /* ... */ } template ...


4

The copy and move constructors will be declared as defaulted and not defined as deleted (that is, they will be generated). They will have the expected behavior (recall that the "move constructor" of a nonclass type has no effect on the source object). The copy and move assignment operators will be declared as defaulted but will be defined as deleted, per ...


3

I think the rationale part could be applied to the copy constructor and copy assignment operator pair also, couldn't it ? Absolutely. The standard agrees with you. In [class.copy]: If the class definition does not explicitly declare a copy constructor, a non-explicit one is declared implicitly. If the class definition declares a move constructor ...


3

Copy elision applies to the return statement in g, and possibly elsewhere. Quoted from cppreference: Copy elision is the only allowed form of optimization that can change the observable side-effects. Because some compilers do not perform copy elision in every situation where it is allowed (e.g., in debug mode), programs that rely on the ...


2

I think SFINAE should help: template<typename T, typename = typename std::enable_if<!std::is_lvalue_reference<T>::value>::type> void f (T &&v) // thought to be rvalue version { // some behavior based on the fact that v is rvalue auto p = std::move (v); (void) p; } template <typename T> void f (const T ...


2

I think this should be rewriten this way. class a { public: a& operator=(a&& other) { delete this->m_d; // avoid leaking this->m_d = other.m_d; other.m_d = nullptr; this->n = other.n; other.n = 0; // n may represents array size return *this; } private: double* m_d; ...


2

There are three std::unique_ptrs that pass your Interf around : b, the local variable in main(); e, the parameter of A's constructor; _e, the member of the constructed A instance. It makes complete sense that moving the Interf instance across three different pointers needs two successive std::move() operations (b to e, then e to _e). Slightly off-topic ...


2

I asked something along those lines here. It seems that in some (many?) cases, instead of a move, a re-borrow takes place. Memory safety is not violated, only the "moved" value is still around. I could not find any docs on that behavior either. @Levans opened a github issue here, although I'm not entirely convinced this is just a doc issue: dependably ...


1

According to cppreference: Implicitly-declared move constructor If no user-defined move constructors are provided for a class type (struct, class, or union), and all of the following is true: there are no user-declared copy constructors there are no user-declared copy assignment operators there are no user-declared move assignment ...


1

IMHO using noexcept will not enable any compiler optimization on its own. There are traits in STL: std::is_nothrow_move_constructible std::is_nothrow_move_assignable STL containters like vector etc use these traits to test type T and use move constructors and assignment instead of copy constructors and assignment. Why STL use these traits instead of: ...


1

Short answer: performances should be the same if copy elision is performed. Otherwise the latter should probably be faster. Long answer: This code std::string s = std::string("Hello") should call a move constructor in C++11+ code (it requires an accessible one). Anyway copy elision is allowed in this case, although not mandated (cfr. [class.copy]/p31) ...


1

When you use strings smaller than 20 characters (depending on the implementation), short string optimization kicks in, and everything is copied anyway. But to answer your question, move semantics is not used in any of your examples anyway. In the first case even if both copy constructor and string(const char*) constructors must be available, copy elision ...


1

Your vector is vector<int> . Moving an int is the same as copying it, so there is no "performance gain" here. If you had vector<std::string> then you would notice a difference; the large strings will be moved from the old memory location to the new memory location. This will be faster than copy-constructing new strings in the new location and ...


1

It depends what you pass in. If you pass a temporary object it will get moved in but if you pass a named variable it will get copied. bar(func_returns_string()); // move std::string s; bar(s); // copy You can force it to move a named variable using std::move: bar(std::move(s)); // move (now s is empty)


1

You are looking for std::move: ObjectToCopy::ObjectToCopy (ObjectToCopy&& other) : _valueInt32( other._valueInt32 ) , _valueInt16( other._valueInt16 ) , _name( std::move(other._name) ) , _colorBody( std::move(other._colorBody) ) { other._valueInt32 = 0; //probably not necessary other._valueInt16 = 0; ...


1

should I std::swap all my data Not generally. Move semantics are there to make things faster, and swapping data that's stored directly in the objects will normally be slower than copying it, and possibly assigning some value to some of the moved-from data members. For your specific scenario... class a { double* m_d; unsigned int n; ...


1

No, if efficiency is any concern, don't swap PODs. There is just no benefit compared to normal assignment, it just results in unnecessary copies. Also consider if setting the moved from POD to 0 is even required at all. I wouldn't even swap the pointer. If this is an owning relationship, use unique_ptr and move from it, otherwise treat it just like a POD ...


1

Instead of preparing the object and then move it into the container as the last step, why not create the object inside the container to begin with and the continue messing around with it? Here is how you would do it with a std::vector directly: std::vector<Object> vector; vector.emplace_back(args...); Object& object = vector.back(); Then you ...


1

It wouldn't be quite that simple, you need one more thing: void Container::addObject( Object && object) { vector.push_back(std::move(object)); } Within the addObject function, object itself is actually an lvalue, you have to cast it back to an rvalue.



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