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12

The premise of the question that: s1 + s2 + s3 + s4 + s5 + ... + sn will require n allocations is incorrect. Instead it will require O(Log(n)) allocations. The first s1 + s1 will generate a temporary. Subsequently a temporary (rvalue) will be the left argument to all subsequent + operations. The standard specifies that when the lhs of a string + is an ...


10

In your case, returnedStr will be move-constructed from the return value of GetString(), but that return value will be copy-constructed from str(1). If str wasn't const, the return value would be move-constructed from it. Note that in both cases, return value optimisation is still applicable, so the compiler can still construct the return value (or even str ...


9

This is set out in the C++11 standard, ยง 12.8/32: When the criteria for elision of a copy operation are met or would be met save for the fact that the source object is a function parameter, and the object to be copied is designated by an lvalue, overload resolution to select the constructor for the copy is first performed as if the object were ...


7

std::string combined; combined.reserve(s1.size() + s2.size() + s3.size() + s4.size() + s5.size()); combined += s1; combined += s2; combined += s3; combined += s4; combined += s5; return combined;


5

You may use some wrapper with explicit name: template <typename T> class MyMove { public: explicit MyMove(T& t) : t(t) {} T& get() {return t;} private: T& t; }; template <typename T> MyMove<T> myMove(T& t) { return MyMove<T>(t); } And then class Foo { public: ...


4

Angew's answer is right but who can remember all the language lawyer rules? To help me remember it easier I wrote the following rules which came from STL's own mouth. 15) Don't return locals as const [16] $ Inhibits move semantics 16) Don't use move when returning local by value of exact same type [16] $ NVRO won't be used if you do ...


4

You could define a type wrapping a reference, and a function to wrap it, to give something similar to move semantics at the call site. Something along the lines of template <typename T> struct move_ref { explicit move_ref(T & ref) : ref(ref) {} T & ref; }; template <typename T> move_ref<T> move(T & t) {return ...


4

There is no engineering like over engineering. In this case, I create a type string_builder::op<?> that reasonably efficiently collects a pile of strings to concatenate, and when cast into a std::string proceeds to do so. It stores copies of any temporary std::strings provided, and references to longer-lived ones, as a bit of paranoia. It ends up ...


3

It looks as though you're doing move semantics wrong. You should return by value, not by rvalue reference, and let the move constructor ensure that returning by value is efficient. Otherwise you risk returning a dangling reference to an object that no longer exists. The point of move semantics is to make passing objects by value cheap, rvalue references ...


3

This is called copy elision and is described in C++ standard, section 12.8 pt 31. When certain criteria are met, an implementation is allowed to omit the copy/move construction of a class object, even if the constructor selected for the copy/move operation and/or the destructor for the object have side effects. In such cases, the implementation ...


3

The compiler will generate a default move constructor if you don't specify one in the base class (except some cases, e.g. there's a base class with a deleted move constructor) but you should, in any case, call explicitly the base class' one if you have it: Sub(Sub&& o) : Base(std::move(o))


3

No, there's no point moving a string literal. It's a static array (not a "temporary that's constructed"), which can't be moved, only copied.


3

Sure it is possible to have move semantics in C++03. Using Boost.Move: #include <vector> #include <utility> #include <boost/move/move.hpp> class Foo { public: Foo(BOOST_RV_REF(std::vector<int>) vec) { std::swap(vec, m_vec); // "move" vec into member vector } private: std::vector<int> m_vec; }; int ...


3

I consider a missing std::move() where a non-trivial object can be moved but the compilers can't detect that this is the case to be an error in the code. That is, the std::move() in the constructor is mandatory: clearly, the temporary object the constructor is called with is about to go out of scope, i.e., it can be safely moved from. On the other hand, ...


2

I'm similarly nonplussed by this issue. As far as I can tell, the best current idiom is to divide the pass-by-value into a pair of pass-by-references. template< typename t > std::decay_t< t > val( t && o ) // Given an object, return a new object "val"ue by move or copy { return std::forward< t >( o ); } Result ...


2

Because return of certain expressions, such as local automatic variables, are explicitly defined to return a moved object, if the moving operator is available. So: return p; is more or less similar to: return std::move(p); But note that this will not work for example with a global variable. std::unique_ptr<int> g(new int(3)); ...


1

With http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Return_value_optimization in A a6 = g();, the code within g creates a6 by calling one of the A constructors somewhere in the middle of the body of g.


1

Apparently this issue was discussed lively at the recent CppCon 2014. Herb Sutter summarized the latest state of things in his closing talk, Back to the Basics! Essentials of Modern C++ Style (slides). His conclusion is quite simply: Don't use pass-by-value for sink arguments. The arguments for using this technique in the first place (as popularized by ...


1

You can use code like: std::string(s1) + s2 + s3 + s4 + s5 + s6 + .... This will allocates a single unnamed temporary (copy of the first string), and then append each of the other strings to it. A smart optimizer could optimize this into the same code as the reserve+append code others have posted, as all these functions are generally inlineable. This ...



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