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2

The return statement in get_tuple() should be copy-initialized using the move-constructor, but since the type of the return expression and the return type don't match, the copy-constructor is chosen instead. There was a change made in C++14 where there is now an initial phase of overload resolution that treats the return statement as an rvalue when it is ...


5

Overload resolution is ambiguous because when you pass an rvalue, both MyClass and MyClass && can be directly initialised by it. If you want to provide a different implementation of copy and move assignment, the customary way is to take the copy assignment operator's parameter by const reference: MyClass& operator=(const MyClass &rhs); // ...


-4

This is because your copy assignment is not a copy assignment. MyClass& operator=(const MyClass &rhs); // copy assignment That's a copy assignment.


2

I wouldn't bother with all those overloads. Always take the std::wstring arguments by value and std::move them in the mem-initializer. Then you only need 3 constructor definitions. The caveat is that you incur an extra move construction in the cases where you're being passed an rvalue, but you can most likely live with that. LogRecord(const Logger ...


9

Yes, if you move the shared pointer into the function, then: the original sourcePtr will become null, and the reference count does not get modified. If you know that you will no longer need the value of sourcePtr after the function call, moving it into the function is a slight optimisation, as it saves an atomic increment (and later decrement, when ...


6

The problem is that you are confusing is_move_constructible and "has a move constructor". is_move_constructible<T> doesn't test whether T has a move constructor. It tests whether T can be constructed from an rvalue of type T. And const T& can bind to a T rvalue. What you are seeing is the autogenerated copy constructor T(const T&) doing its ...


2

Your problem is two fold. First, you are capturing by reference in a lambda whose lifetime (and the lifetime of its copies) exceeds the current local scope. Don't do that. Only use [&] if your lambda (and all copies) will not be copied out of the lifetime of the local scope. The naive answer is to then do a [=] or [y], but you cannot copy a unique ...


2

void put(std::unique_ptr<Y> y) { m_queue.push([&] { foo(std::move(y)); }); } Here, you push a lambda that contains a reference to the local variable y. The moment you leave put, the local variable is destroyed, and the lambda contains a dangling reference. Any further behavior is undefined. You would need to capture the local variable by ...


2

Because y gets destroyed: void put(std::unique_ptr<Y> y) { m_queue.push([&] { // <== capturing y by-reference foo(std::move(y)); }); // <== y gets destroyed here } At the end of put(), y has already been cleaned up. You'd want your functor to take ownership of y, which would ideally look something like: [p = ...


4

void put(std::unique_ptr<Y> y) { m_queue.push([&] { foo(std::move(y)); }); } In this function, y is a local variable which gets destroyed when it goes out of scope. The local variable is captured (by reference), by the lambda, doesn't exist by the time when it is executed — it is pointing to nothing/null/garbage/whatever, as the y has ...


6

The vector is constructed with 10 elements in your example. Then you add one. If there is no more room in capacity(), a new buffer must be allocated, the 10 elements already there must be moved into it, then your new element appended. You'll notice the word move above -- that is why you need the move ctor. What more, even if you did not have elements ...


7

Like this: std::vector<std::string> make_a_vector_of_strings() { std::vector<std::string> result; // just an example; real logic goes here result.push_back("Hello"); result.push_back("World"); return result; } The operand of the return statement is eligible for copy elision, and if the copy is not elided, the operand is ...


6

There is no such thing as "universal (or uniform) initialization syntax", after all. List-initialization has some peculiar behaviors. In your case, the relevant rules are found in section 8.5.1: An aggregate is an array or a class (Clause 9) with no user-provided constructors (12.1), no private or protected non-static data members ...


4

Since Foo, is an aggregate, aggregate initialization is performed. N3797 ยง8.5.4 [dcl.init.list]/3: List-initialization of an object or reference of type T is defined as follows: If T is an aggregate, aggregate initialization is performed (8.5.1). It seems this has been changed for C++17, according to N4296: List-initialization of an ...


1

In the comment to your second solution, you're saying that it weakens the encapsulation, because the Simulation has to know that Light needs more information during move. I think it is the other way around. The Light needs to know that is being used in a context where the provided reference to the Time object may become invalid during Light's lifetime. Which ...


1

1: What solution would you use? Do you think of another one? Why not apply a few design patterns? I see uses for a factory and a singleton in your solution. There are probably a few others that we could claim work but I am way more experienced with applying a Factory during a simulation than anything else. Simulation turns into a Singleton. The ...


4

The main problem is that once you have a reference to an item, you cannot move that item. Let's look at a simplified example of memory: let a = Struct1; // the memory for Struct1 is on the stack at 0x1000 let b = &a; // the value of b is 0x1000 let c = a; // This moves a to c, and it now sits on the stack at 0x2000 Oh no, if we try to use ...


0

Gcc has the flag -fno-elide-constructors which disables copy elision. With that option, both of the moves will be done in your example code.


3

The criterion for elision in this case is: when a temporary class object that has not been bound to a reference would be copied/moved to a class object with the same cv-unqualified type So a simple way to prevent elision would be to bind it to a reference: foo(std::move(makeWidget());


3

I think you shouldn't move from *this, but from its data field. Since this clearly will leave the Marshaller object in an valid but unusable state, the member function that does this should itself should have an rvalue reference qualifier on its implicit *this argument. class Marshaller { public: ... DataType Marshaller::unwrap() && { return ...


5

There is nothing inherently unsafe about calling move(*this). The move is essentially just a hint to a function being called that it may steal the internals of the object. In the type system, this promise is expressed through && references. This is not related to destruction in any way. The move does not perform any type of destruction - as ...


7

I would avoid moving from *this, but if you do it, at least you should add rvalue ref-qualifier to the function: DataType Marshaller::toDataType() && { return Marshaller::extractData(std::move(*this)); } This way, the user will have to call it like this: // explicit move, so the user is aware that the marshaller is no longer usable Marshaller ...


1

It's just the usual non-compliance of Visual C++ allowing binding a non-const lvalue reference to a temporary. It violates the language rules, but it went too long before being caught, so now there's code that depends on the bug that would break if it were properly fixed. That behavior mistakenly allowing the non-const copy constructor to be used, combined ...


-1

Your question is probably answered here. A temporary object cannot bind to a non-const reference. The copy constructor must take a reference to a const object to be able to make copies of temporary objects. The other thing is that temporary objects shall not be modifiable as they are to be destroyed anytime soon. Holding a reference to temporaries ...


2

You write that you'd like to simultaneously destroy the Marshaller and remove the data from it. I really wouldn't worry about trying to do these things simultaneously, just move the data out first and then destroy the Marshaller object. There are a number of ways to get rid of the Marshaller without thinking much about it, perhaps a smart pointer makes sense ...


11

According to the standard the move-from object will still be valid although its state is not guaranteed, so it seems that moving from *this would be perfectly valid. Whether it's confusing to users of your code is another question entirely. All that said it sounds like your real intention is to link the destruction of the marshallar with the extraction of ...


9

I think it's a very common issue when coming from C++. In C++ you are doing everything explicitly when it comes to copying and moving. The language was designed around copying and references. With C++11 the ability to "move" stuff was glued onto that system. Rust on the other hand took a fresh start. Rust doesn't have constructors at all, let alone ...


3

Wow, when I compile this with... Visual Studio in Debug I see "Default! Copy!". Visual Studio in Release I see "Default!". If you change Bar(Bar &that) to Bar(const Bar &that) then "Default! Move!" Shockingly, if you switch the order of Bar(Bar &that) with Bar(Bar &&that) (so that the move ctor is defined first) then you'll actually see ...


2

If all classes need access to the same const (and therefore immutable) feature, you have (at least) 2 options to make the code clean and maintainable: store copies of the SharedFeature rather than references - this is reasonable if SharedFeature is both small and stateless. store a std::shared_ptr<const SharedFeature> rather than a reference to const ...


1

EDIT: Due to the class naming and ordering I completely missed the fact that your two classes are unrelated. It's really hard to help you with such an abstract concept as "feature" but I'm going to completely change my thought here. I would suggest moving the feature's ownership into MySubStruct. Now copying and moving will work fine because only ...


0

You don't have to do an std::move on a function call like that, as the returned value is already an rvalue. In this case, the returned vector will be moved into v by the move constructor, so you don't have to do anything.


7

Neither: There's no benefit. The compiler does nothing special except for compiling C++. It will probably try to do this well. Fortunately, the expression generateVector() is already an rvalue, so v will be constructed with the move constructor, but in fact your declaration of v and your definition of generateVector are subject to copy elision, so that ...


5

The result of a function call that returns an object is already an rvalue, so applying std::move has no benefit. In fact it can be a pessimisation: without std::move, the variable is directly initialised from a temporary, and so the temporary (and the move) can be elided.


6

The purpose of std::move is to make an lvalue into an rvalue. In your case, generateVector() is already an rvalue, so it's redundant.


0

In this statement Sniffer& h = *std::unique_ptr<Sniffer>(new Sniffer()); a temporary object of type std::unique_ptr<Sniffer> is created that is destroyed at the end of execution of the statement. Thus reference h is invalid in the scope of the code block. In this statement std::unique_ptr<Sniffer> p(new Sniffer()); // ...


2

The std::unique_pointer<Sniffer> is a temporary in your "1", so is destroyed after the statement completes. Its destructor destroys the Sniffer object, before the next statement (h();) is reached. h is a dangling reference, so the result of h() (i.e. h.operator()()) is undefined. In your case "2", the object p continues to exist until the end ...


1

Line 1 creates a temporary unique_ptr object which is dereferenced and the result of that is what the reference h will then point to. However, as the unique_ptr object is a temporary, its destructor will be called at the semicolon (See object lifetime). This will also call the destructor of the Sniffer object that the temporary unique_ptr pointed to. The ...


1

It because when you do Sniffer& h = *std::unique_ptr<Sniffer>(new Sniffer()); the std::unique_ptr object you create is temporary and is destructed, leaving you with a reference to an object that no longer exists and you enter the land of undefined behavior. When you do std::unique_ptr<Sniffer> p(new Sniffer()); you create an actual ...


2

Returning Foo is potentially expensive, and impossible if the type isn't copyable. It's also surprising: (a=b)=c would create a temporary and assign c to that, when you'd expect both assignments to be to a. Returning Foo&& is just weird; you don't want things mysteriously turning into rvalues so that e.g. f(a=b) unexpectedly moves from a without you ...


7

You're asking the wrong question: std::move does nothing, so it doesn't matter that the function arguments aren't evaluated in a specified order. What matters is that foo1.id() is invoked before the call to emplace, which moves from the reference to foo1 provided by std::move. That is the case - function calls are always sequenced after the evaluation of ...


2

StringPointerWrapper spw5(StringPointerWrapper("String for move constructor")); This invokes the default constructor because the compiler has decided to optimize this by not creating a temporary (i.e., it has decided to do StringPointerWrapper spw5("String for move constructor")). Instead force a move by performing StringPointerWrapper ...


2

The move constructors are not being called because the compiler is eliding the constructor as an optimization. If you pass -fno-elide-constructors in your compiler invocation, you can disable this. However, you have issues because your move constructor is just using the pointer from other, which is deleted soon after. It doesn't really make sense to hold ...


0

you need to tell the compiler yourself to move things with std::move try: StringPointerWrapper spw5(std::move(StringPointerWrapper("String for move constructor")));


4

No, it's not implicit, but explicit. Also in C++11 21.4/5 is basic_string(basic_string&& str) noexcept;


3

Since C++11, having a container of only default constructible objects is perfectly legal, provided that you do not use any operation that requires the object to be copyable or movable. However, std::initializer_list allows only const access to its elements, meaning that you can't move from them. Hence vector<Test> v = { Test(), Test() }; would ...


3

By-value parameters aren't subject to NRVO (Why are by-value parameters excluded from NRVO?) so they are moved instead (Are value parameters implicitly moved when returned by value?) A fairly simple solution is to take both parameters by const reference and copy within the function body: Foo operator+(Foo const& rhs) const { cout << "Summing ...


2

If you want to get rid of temporaries, I suggest you use the following implementation: Foo operator+(const Foo& rhs) const { cout << "Summing Foo objects" << endl; Foo result(rhs); result += *this; return result; } which allows the NRVO to be applied. Your second version might be optimized away by a "Sufficiently Smart ...



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