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1

You are looking for std::move: ObjectToCopy::ObjectToCopy (ObjectToCopy&& other) : _valueInt32( other._valueInt32 ) , _valueInt16( other._valueInt16 ) , _name( std::move(other._name) ) , _colorBody( std::move(other._colorBody) ) { other._valueInt32 = 0; //probably not necessary other._valueInt16 = 0; ...


2

I think this should be rewriten this way. class a { public: a& operator=(a&& other) { delete this->m_d; // avoid leaking this->m_d = other.m_d; other.m_d = nullptr; this->n = other.n; other.n = 0; // n may represents array size return *this; } private: double* m_d; ...


1

should I std::swap all my data Not generally. Move semantics are there to make things faster, and swapping data that's stored directly in the objects will normally be slower than copying it, and possibly assigning some value to some of the moved-from data members. For your specific scenario... class a { double* m_d; unsigned int n; ...


1

No, if efficiency is any concern, don't swap PODs. There is just no benefit compared to normal assignment, it just results in unnecessary copies. Also consider if setting the moved from POD to 0 is even required at all. I wouldn't even swap the pointer. If this is an owning relationship, use unique_ptr and move from it, otherwise treat it just like a POD ...


6

No. The buffer that std::string manages is private to it. You can access it via &str[0], but the string will still own it and will destroy it when it goes out of scope. You have no way of telling str that it now owns a different buffer, or to set its underlying buffer to nullptr, or any other way of making it not delete that buffer. That's ...


1

Instead of preparing the object and then move it into the container as the last step, why not create the object inside the container to begin with and the continue messing around with it? Here is how you would do it with a std::vector directly: std::vector<Object> vector; vector.emplace_back(args...); Object& object = vector.back(); Then you ...


1

It wouldn't be quite that simple, you need one more thing: void Container::addObject( Object && object) { vector.push_back(std::move(object)); } Within the addObject function, object itself is actually an lvalue, you have to cast it back to an rvalue.


4

The copy and move constructors will be declared as defaulted and not defined as deleted (that is, they will be generated). They will have the expected behavior (recall that the "move constructor" of a nonclass type has no effect on the source object). The copy and move assignment operators will be declared as defaulted but will be defined as deleted, per ...


0

One more possible case: when you need to unpack a tuple and pass the values to a function. It could be useful in this case, if you're not sure about copy-elision. Such an example: template<typename ... Args> class store_args{ public: std::tuple<Args...> args; template<typename Functor, size_t ... Indices> ...


0

You can return by reference if you are sure the referenced object will not go out of scope after the function exits, e.g. it's a global object's reference, or member function returning reference to class fields, etc. This returning reference rule is just same to both lvalue and rvalue reference. The difference is how you want to use the returned reference. ...


1

You can't move a live object, but you can move-construct another from it. int main() { std::string str = "Hello World !"; // Allocate some storage void *storage = std::malloc(sizeof str); std::cout << str << '\n'; // Move-contruct the new string inside the storage std::string *str2 = new (storage) ...


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Like this, but if you don't know what you're doing then I would avoid doing this: #include <new> #include <stdlib.h> void* mem = malloc(sizeof(T)); T t; T* tt = new(mem) T( std::move(t) ); tt->doSomething(); tt->~T(); free(mem); You can't literally "move" t to that memory, t will always be where it was created, but you can create ...


0

Do I have to this.measurement_x = old.measurement_x ;// for all x = {1,..,n} ? I would rely on the pimpl idiom for this, and use something like a unique pointer. Below is a detailed example. Note you only have to work with Impl, and rely on its defaults (as it contains no pointers). #include <iostream> #include <memory> struct Moveable { ...


0

First off just be aware that move-semantics give no advantage over copy-semantics for plain-old-data type (POD) members, but it sure does when your class contains other class objects and/or arrays. When you implement move-semantics, it means you have a "move constructor" and/or a "move assignment operator" which would look like this in your class: class ...


1

Nope. QObject derived classes should never be copied and using the Q_DISABLE_COPY macro QObject and derived classes explicitly disable/hide the copy constructor and assignment operator by declaring them private. Possibly this has changed with recent releases and c++ 11 compatible compilers where they might now be declared deleted. See here So the Rule of ...


1

I think answers to this question Why isn't the copy constructor elided here? are really useful in answering your question. Copy elision is not used in your example Foo getBigData() { Bar b; b.workOnBigData(); return b.bigData; } since this requiment is not fullfiled (http://en.cppreference.com/w/cpp/language/copy_elision): the return ...


2

There are lots of ways to avoid extra copies, the one closer to your code would be imho: Foo getBigData() { Foo ret; // do a cheap initialization Bar b; b.workOnBigData(); std::swap(ret, b.bigData); // 'steal' the member here return ret; // NRVO can apply } The same can achieved by move constructing the return object Foo ...


0

I don't believe std::array would have compiler-generated move operations if there are copy equivalents present, or am I wrong? And as a sidenote, to move those unique_ptrs one could use std::move algorithm instead of raw loop: std::move(std::begin(other.m_children), std::end(other.m_children), std::begin(m_children));


2

according to the error message, it doesn't call the move constructor of the unique_ptr. Instead, it calls the copy-constructor of it which is not exist. So, iterate over the unique_ptrs and call move constructor explicitly. int i = 0; for(auto& x : other.m_children) m_children[i++] = std::move(x); Btw, normally it should work because ...


6

It seems like in vs2013 that definition of std::array in the <array> header doesn't include a move constructor or move assignment operator. Under C++ rules these should be automatically generated (and so unnecessary to manually define), but msvc didn't include implicit generation of those until vs2015.


1

Is there any workaround except removing the const of returning methods No. Returning const values in this case is silly and pointless as the user can simply make a mutable copy at will. You only prohibit optimizations and good semantics (e.g. move semantics) by making it const. Removing the const isn't a "workaround", it's what should be done ...


5

The problem is you didn't implement your copy constructor well. instead of : Pair(const Pair & other){}; you wrote Pair(Pair & other){}; this causes the constructor to accept only l-value variables, no temporaries, since only const references can bind to temporaries and r-value references. this forces the compiler to return Pair from get as ...


0

You cannot move a const object as a move operation is a modification. When you move you swap the contents of the old object into the new object. this in turn puts the indeterminate value of the new object into the old object. You could not do that if the old object is const as you would not be able to write to it. When you use move semantics you want to ...


2

This: f = std::move(Foo()); doesn't call the move constructor. It calls the move assignment operator. Furthermore, it's redundant, since Foo() is already an rvalue so that's equivalent to: f = Foo(); Since you declared a move constructor, the move assignment operator isn't declared - so there isn't one. So you either have to provide one: Foo& ...


7

You can't move from a const thing, because a move involves mutation of the source. Therefore, a copy is being attempted instead. And, as you know, that's impossible here. Your move constructor should look like this, with no const: Foo(Foo&& other) : m_bar(std::move(other.m_bar)) {}


2

Your example of how this can be used to create a dangling reference is very interesting, but it's important to learn the correct lesson from the example. Consider a much simpler example, that doesn't have any && anywhere: const int &x = vector<int>(1) .front(); .front() returns an &-reference to the first element of the new ...


1

The rvalue you get from std::move is an rvalue reference, and references don't have a destructor. You can't get to that reference anymore. So why don't you think it has been destroyed?


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std::move(a) does not alter a to become an rvalue. Instead, it creates an rvalue reference to a. Edit: Note that, with your line const A& a = A(); you rely on a the special case of local const references prolonging the lives of temporaries (see e.g. http://herbsutter.com/2008/01/01/gotw-88-a-candidate-for-the-most-important-const/). This ...


1

Remember: std::move doesn't move the object. std::move is a simple cast that takes an lvalue and makes it look like an rvalue foo, by taking an argument by rvalue reference, says that the input object will be modified, but left in a valid state. Nothing here about destroying the object. In the end, a remains an lvalue, no matter how much you try to cast ...


3

std::move does not make a into a temporary value. Rather it creates an rvalue reference to a, which is used in function foo. In this case std::move is not doing anything for you. The point of std::move is that you can indicate that a move constructor should be used instead of a copy constructor, or that a function being called is free to modify the object ...



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