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1

Make an uncopyable wrapper: #include <vector> template<typename T> class uncopyable { public: uncopyable(const uncopyable&) = delete; uncopyable(uncopyable&&) = default; uncopyable(T&& data) : data_(std::move(data)) { } public: uncopyable& operator=(const uncopyable&) = delete; ...


1

If it's a class member, then just make it private and only allow access in the ways you want: std::vector<int16_t> const & get_samples() {return samples;} void set_samples(std::vector<int16_t> && s) {samples = std::move(s);} Otherwise, there's not much you can do to enforce particular access patterns.


2

Write a function named sum. sum has 3 overloads: lhs&&, rhs const& and lhs const&, rhs&&, ... -- the ... is important, as it makes it the worst match, removing ambiguity. And finally const& lhs, const& rhs. Then template<lhs, rhs> auto operator+(lhs&&,rhs&&)->decltype perfect forwards to sum. Once ...


3

If possible, use unique_ptr instead: std::unique_ptr<Bar> bar; Foo(Foo&& f) : bar(std::move(f.bar)){} // or maybe you won't even have to declare move constructor This way not only you'll get more safety and comfort, but also you won't accidentaly rewrite it with =, you'll have to call .reset() so you'll think twice before doing it (which is ...


6

If you will have to change the pointer in some case (even if it's only a single case), then it probably shouldn't be const. However, even putting this thought aside, using const_cast to remove constness from an object, and then using the result of the cast invokes undefined behavior. It is only safe to const_cast a variable that was originally not const.


4

You are basically contradicting yourself. You are saying "I don't want to change it in any circumstance", and the you're saying "I want to change it when i move an object". So, if there is a scenario where it needs to be changed, then it's not a const, and you can feel comfortable removing it. If you are determined that you want it const, you can add ...


8

This note from [expr]/6 might clarify what is going on (emphasis mine): [ Note: An expression is an xvalue if it is: the result of calling a function, whether implicitly or explicitly, whose return type is an rvalue reference to object type, a cast to an rvalue reference to object type, a class member access expression designating a ...


5

The expression a is an lvalue. The expression std::move(a) is an rvalue. Only rvalues bind to rvalue references, which make up the move constructor and move assignment operator. It is worth repeating this to yourself until it makes sense: Evaluating any reference variable, and also dereferencing any dereferenceable pointer, produces an lvalue.


2

If you have a class (perhaps written by someone else) which does not have a move constructor, perhaps not even a copy constructor, then you may have to use unique_ptr. If an instance is optional, i.e. may not be present, you should use unique_ptr. If you can only initialize an object after your constructor is called, and the object is not ...


8

std::move(a, b, c); is semantically identical to std::copy(std::make_move_iterator(a), std::make_move_iterator(b), c); Your efforts to use them both failed because the third argument - the output iterator - should not be a move iterator. You are storing into the third iterator, not moving from it. Both ...


3

std::move moves the elements if possible, and copies otherwise. std::copy will always copy. libstdc++'s copy_move_a also takes a template parameter _IsMove. That, and the iterator types, it delegates to a __copy_move class template that is partially specialized for different iterator categories, etc. but most importantly: Whether to move or not. One of the ...


3

An option is to use std::piecewise_construct: Value* addToMap(int key) { auto ret = _map.emplace(std::piecewise_construct , std::forward_as_tuple(key) , std::forward_as_tuple(key)); return &(ret.first->second); } VC++ DEMO


4

aList.push_back(A(6)); This constructs a temporary A and moves it into the container. The implicitly generated move constructor of A is called, which needs to construct the base traced<A> from the base subobject of the temporary. However, trace explicitly declares a copy constructor, so it doesn't have move constructor by default, and A's move ...


1

A typical situation where you want to transfer ownership from one unique_ptr to another is when returning from a function or when passing as a parameter to a function like a constructor. Say you have some polymorphic type Animal: struct Animal { virtual ~Animal() {} virtual void speak() = 0; }; with concrete subclasses Cat and Dog: struct Cat : ...


0

for example if you call a function you can move your unique_ptr in the parameter list so it can be a part of your function signature foo ( std::unique_ptr<T>&& ptr ) you can call foo with foo( std::move(myPtr) ); Note that std::move is an unconditional cast and unique_ptr is an object with a state, and a part of that state is the pointer ...


2

The return type of Current is a reference type. You are returning a reference to a local object which will be destroyed before the callee tries to access it to construct obj resulting in undefined behavior. The fact that the return type is an rvalue reference has no bearing on this fact, the problem would be the same with an lvalue reference return type. If ...


2

std::ostringstream offers no public interface to access its in-memory buffer unless it non-portably supports pubsetbuf (but even then your buffer is fixed-size, see cppreference example) If you want to torture some string streams, you could access the buffer using the protected interface: #include <iostream> #include <sstream> #include ...


2

It's possible to do this cleanly using a lambda in C++11 (tested in G++ 4.8.2). Given this reusable typedef: template<typename T> using deleted_unique_ptr = std::unique_ptr<T,std::function<void(T*)>>; You can write: deleted_unique_ptr<Foo> foo(new Foo(), [](Foo* f) { customdeleter(f); }); For example, with a FILE*: ...


1

The move constructor is called whenever an object is initialized from xvalue of the same type. You can create that xvalue by calling std::move(x). Declaring a parameter as an rvalue reference will not automatically make it an xvalue.


2

Because SomeType::SomeType(std::vector<Item>&& container, const float someOtherPArameter) : internal_container(container) { // the parameter container is in scope here } It would be pretty surprising if, inside the constructor body, accesses to the parameter container found a moved-from object. (It would also break code that was ...


-2

No, there is no way to avoid a string copy (stringbuf has the same interface) It will never matter. String copies on a modern cpu are extremely cheap. Its almost never worth trying to optimise them away.


-4

In my particular case, the problem was that compiler used const T operator[](const Key & key) const instead of T & operator[](const Key & key) because the method of the class was a const one and the map was a field of the class.


1

Adding to @sehe's answer on how to retrieve references rather than temporary values, boost::multi_index_container is copyable and movable. This BOOST_COPYABLE_AND_MOVABLE macro you refer to has to be placed on the class private section (as specified here), but that does not affect visibility of copy/movement ctors. Moral of the story: consult docs before ...


3

As you can see in the docs for QMap: const T QMap::value(const Key & key, const T & defaultValue = T()) const The value is returned by value, not by reference. Besides being very inefficient for large values (such as multi index containers, maybe?) it also returns a temporary. Now, get<keyVal>(); does return a reference to the first index, ...


3

If vector::push_back needs to reallocate its storage it first allocates new memory, then move constructs the new element into the last position. If that throws the new memory is deallocated, and nothing has changed, you get the strong exception-safety guarantee even if the move constructor can throw. If it doesn't throw, the existing elements are ...


1

A move constructor and move assignment operator have not been implicitly declared because you have explicitly defined a destructor. A copy constructor and copy assignment operator have been implicitly declared though (although this behaviour is deprecated). If a move constructor and move assignment operator have not been implicitly (or explicitly) ...


1

Indeed, there is no implicit move constructor due to the user-declared destructor. But there is an implicit copy constructor and copy-assignment operator; for historical reasons, the destructor doesn't inhibit those, although such behaviour is deprecated since (as you point out) it usually gives invalid copy semantics. They can be used to copy both lvalues ...


1

You're forgetting about copy elision which means that y = function(); may not actually invoke any copy or move constructors; just the constructor for x and the assignment operator. Some compilers let you disable copy elision, as mentioned on that thread. I'm not sure what you mean by "in both cases where move constructor should be called". There are ...


9

You did nothing wrong. You just wrongly thought push_back had to avoid a throwing move-ctor: It does not, at least for constructing the new element. The only place where throwing move-ctors / move-assignments must be shunned is on re-allocation of the vector, to avoid having half the elements moved, and the rest in their original places. The function has ...


1

If the reason you're using an r-value reference is that you want a non const reference bound to the temporary, then IMHO simply don't bother. Instead use value semantics and let the compiler do the optimizations. T t; try { t = a_func_that_may_throw(); // Compiler can use RVO and move assign to 't'. } catch (const std::exception& e) { /* Deal ...


1

It depends what you mean by "deal with the exception". You could do something like this: T wrap_a_func_that_may_throw() { try { return a_func_that_may_throw(); } catch(const std::exception& e) { // Do cleanup, logging, etc... // May have to re-throw if there is // nothing meaningful you can return.... } return T() // Return ...


3

Move semantics are about ownership. Ownership in turn encompasses responsibility. Whenever you perform some kind of operation that requires some matching, further operation in the future (e.g. allocating and deallocating a resource, or creating and calling a mandatory callback), then the initial operation creates responsibility. Failure to enact the ...


4

An other alternative is: template<typename T> struct f_caller { void operator () (T&& ) { std::cout << "T&&" << std::endl; } void operator () (T const& ) { std::cout << "const T&" << std::endl; } }; template <typename T> void f(T&& t) { f_caller<typename ...


7

That'd be one way: #include <type_traits> template<typename T> typename std::enable_if< !std::is_lvalue_reference<T>::value >::type f(T&& t) {} template<typename T> void f(T const& t) {} Another possibility is tag dispatching: template<typename T> void f_(const T&, std::true_type) { std::cout << ...


0

std::move is not required for returning objects: BigMatrix BuildBigMatrix() { ... return someBigMatrix; // *moved* outside of function }


8

There's no need for std::move here. The value of a function call expression is already an rvalue.


3

It depends on the return type. If the return type is an lvalue reference then the function call expression is an lvalue, otherwise it is an rvalue. When you write T1 t = func(); , func() is an rvalue. However this situation is a candidate for copy elision which is why you do not see any copy-constructor or move-constructor calls. For T1 t2 = std::move(t); ...



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