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3

This is a missing feature on GCC : see bug 54316 , it has been fixed (you can thank Jonathan Wakely) for the next versions (gcc 5) Clang with libc++ compiles this code : int main () { std::stringstream stream("1234"); std::stringstream stream2 = std::move(std::stringstream("5678")); return 0; } Live demo And it also compiles the example with ...


1

Compare these two functions: void Bar(Foo&& x) { std::cout << "# " << x.value << std::endl; } vs. void Bar(Foo&& x) { std::cout << "# " << x.value << std::endl; Foo y=std::move(x); } Both take an rvalue reference, but only the second calls the move constructor. Consequently, the output of ...


2

When you write value = std::move(other.value); you should understand that std::move does not move anything. It just converts its parameter to a rvalue reference, then, if the left hand side has a move constructor/assignment operator, the left hand side deals with it (and how to actually move the object). For plain old types (PODs), std::move doesn't really ...


4

An rvalue reference is (surprise:) a reference indeed. You can move from it, but std::move does not move. So, if you don't move from it, you'll actually operate on the rvalue object (through the rvalue reference). The usual pattern would be void foo(X&& x) { X mine(std::move(x)); // x will not be affected anymore } However, when you ...


2

The built-in = operator, when used as a = b, has well-documented long-standing behaviour of reading b's value, and storing it in a. There is nothing in the standard that suggests that integer assignment modifies the assignment RHS. 5.17 Assignment and compound assignment operators [expr.ass] ... 2 In simple assignment (=), the value of the ...


1

PODs don't really move, they copy (or, their copy and move is the same operation, as there is nothing to really "move" in that case) - see here.


2

What you're doing is: map<string,Elem> m; m["file1"] = // this default-constructs an Elem // and returns a reference to it in the correct spot move(Elem("file1")); // and THEN move-assigns it What you need to do: map<string, Elem> m; m.emplace("file1", Elem("file1")); or ...


1

Depends on how you define the moved-out state of your ThreadsafeQueue. I see two reasonable common ways: Moved-out queue is empty, and it's OK to push new items into it and so on. Then the answer to your question is yes. I personally prefer this in most cases. Moved-out queue is left in unspecified state and can be destructed or assigned to only. Then the ...


1

Moving a value is a mutating operation. Mutating requires exclusive access in order to not have a data race. Therefore the caller should already hold the lock. The caller that passes the object as a rvalue knows it's going to be mutated (or at least promises that it's okay for the receiving function to do so). REALITY: None of this is likely to happen. ...


2

1. What is it? It "looks like" a function - but I would say it isn't really a function. It doesn't move anything (!) It's sort of a converter between ways the compiler considers an expression's value. 2. What does it do? If you've ever watched Bleach - it does the equivalent of Quincy's Reishi softening ^_^ Seriously, though, it converts an expression ...


1

Yes, this is the correct way. You have to be very careful, though, because your old vector is left in an unspecified state; you might want to empty it to avoid surprises. std::vector<int> Big::convertToVector() { std::vector<int> temp; std::swap(temp, _data); return std::move(temp); }


-1

as long as I know, std::vector has move constructor, so you just do (as I always do with other containers) std::vector<int> Big::convert_to_vector() { return data_; }


1

If the code looks like it should be optimized, but is not getting optimized I would submit bug here http://connect.microsoft.com/VisualStudio or raise a support case with Microsoft. This article, although it is for VC++2005 (I couldn't find a current version of document) does explain some scenarios where it won't work. ...


5

Yes you can have std::vector<NotCopyable> if NotCopyable is movable: struct NotCopyable { NotCopyable() = default; NotCopyable(const NotCopyable&) = delete; NotCopyable& operator = (const NotCopyable&) = delete; NotCopyable(NotCopyable&&) = default; NotCopyable& operator = (NotCopyable&&) = default; ...


2

As long as the elements are movable then, yes, simply store them in the vector.


0

I think that the most appropriate way to construct that object for that vector is to use emplace_back aka you just create that object in place, you don't copy, you don't move, you just create that thing right were it's supposed to be in the first place . emplace_back


9

std::move is redundant there. The purpose of move is to treat a variable as a temporary (more accurately, an rvalue) when it's not (or might not be). If it's already an rvalue, it will certainly be moved if possible anyway.


0

If you want to only accept lvalues, you can just write a constructor that does that: Game(RuleSet& r) : rules(r) { } That way you just can't pass in temporaries easily, and you can still take a const& to what's passed. You could also take every argument by universal ref and forward each argument one-by-one. This will also hide the const aspect ...


0

The emplace_back gets a list of rvalue references and tries to construct a container element direct in place. You can call emplace_back with all types which the container element constructors supports. When call emplace_back for parameters which are not rvalue references, it 'falls back' to normal references and at least the copy constructor ist called when ...


25

Let's see what the different calls that you provided do: emplace_back(mystring): This is an in-place construction of the new element with whatever argument you provided. Since you provided an lvalue, that in-place construction in fact is a copy-construction, i.e. this is the same as calling push_back(mystring) push_back(std::move(mystring)): This calls the ...


4

What you propose is not feasible because, by its very nature, moving is the transfer of a state from one object to one other object. You cannot construct N objects by moving state from one to all of them at the same time. The Stargate universe violated this rule by introducing the ability to open a wormhole to every gate in the galaxy simultaneously, which ...



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