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23

You need to make the inner lambda mutable: [this](Pointer* list) { thread_pool.Push([this, list = std::unique_ptr<int>(list) ]() mutable { ^^^^^^^^^ Clean(std::move(list)); }); }; operator() on lambdas is const by default, so you cannot modify its members in that call. As such, ...


4

Consider this: Rational a, b, c; a = b*c; If operator* returns a non-const Rational, then the return value of b*c can be moved into a, as the value is not const and can be modified. The move assignment operator operator=(Rational&&) will be invoked. If operator* returns const Rational, then the return value of b*c can't be moved into a, as the ...


4

For any class with a non-trivial destructor, destroying it twice is undefined behavior by core language rule: [basic.life]/p1: The lifetime of an object of type T ends when: if T is a class type with a non-trivial destructor (12.4), the destructor call starts, or the storage which the object occupies is reused or released. ...


3

If you call destructor explicitely, it will be called second time implicitely when f3 goes out of scope. This creates UB and that is why your class crashes. You can work-around the crash in delete by resetting s to nullptr in the destructor (so that second time it is nullptr) but the UB in calling destructor twice will be still there.


2

Here's an example of this working perfectly fine: #include <memory> #include <vector> class Foo { }; typedef std::vector<std::shared_ptr<Foo> > FooMap; class Bar { public: Bar(FooMap & foos): foos_(foos) {} private: FooMap foos_; }; int main() { FooMap f = { ...


1

The push_back method has two overloads: void push_back( const T& value ); void push_back( T&& value ); If you use the first one, T (Foo in your case) must be "CopyInsertable". If you use the second one, it must be "MoveInsertable". Your passFoo2 function receives a const Foo&& reference, and since it is const-qualified (see note ...


2

If you need to transfer ownership from one scope to another, you need a separate object. And since you can't (and don't want to) copy a unique_ptr, that means you need to move it. For example, when returning a unique_ptr from a function. std::unique_ptr<Foo> func() { std::unique_ptr<Foo> ptr(new Foo); ... return ptr; } This ...


0

The move constructor and move assignment operator are needed for the std::unique_ptr as it is a non copy-able and therefore unique object. Since it is non copy-able there needs to be a way to pass it to things and thus move operations take care of that.


3

First invokes the regular constructor UniquePointer(T* ptr) (not the move constructor). Second invokes the move constructor UniquePointer(UniquePointer&& rhs), as you pass in a rvalue of the type UniquePointer, and the copy constructor is deleted. You need the move constructor also when you do UniquePtr<T> ptr = ...


8

the reason is that push_back has an overload for Foo&& not const Foo&&. const Foo&& is superfluous. It's a legal type but its existence is an anachronism. this compiles: #include <iostream> #include <list> class Foo { public: Foo() {} Foo( Foo &&f) noexcept {} Foo(const Foo &f) = delete; ...


2

We can see exactly what GCC is doing under the hood by compiling both cases with -S: g++-4.6 -std=c++0x test.cc -S -fverbose-asm And then using diff to compare the outputs: diff -rNu move.s ret.s |c++filt --- move.s 2015-05-21 14:00:49.097524035 +0100 +++ ret.s 2015-05-21 14:00:40.021510019 +0100 @@ -79,23 +79,13 @@ .cfi_offset 5, -8 ...


3

Because emplace will: [Insert] a new element into the container by constructing it in-place with the given args if there is no element with the key in the container. The container was previously empty, so you're definitely going to insert a new element. Zero arguments is a valid constructor for A*, so the code compiles and you end up with a set with ...


1

Performing a static_cast to reference will do (example use movable class C, which can be vector) cast to lvalue reference disables both move and NRVO C f() { C c; return static_cast<C&>(c); } cast to rvalue reference disables just NRVO C f() { C c; return static_cast<C&&>(c); }


2

The short answer is, you cannot make return f; not move. When you return in C++, elision is default, and if not that it is moved, and if not that it is copied. If you use a non-trivial statement -- even true?v:v, or static_cast<whatever const&>(v) -- it will prevent auto-move and force a copy. But that won't help you. Avoiding the move won't ...


2

The question is how to avoid C++11's default behavior and execute copy constructor instead of move here? That isn't the default behaviour. The default behaviour would be to elide the copy in this case. The move would only take place in the unlikely case that the implementation does not implement NRVO.


3

Optimizing for r-values Comparing void setData(std::string arg) and void setData(std::string&& arg). In the first case I assume setData moves the data into place class Widget { std::string data; public: void setData(std::string data) { this->data = std::move(data); } }; And if we called it like this w.setData(std::move(data)); we will ...


5

Cant compiler decide do if use of move shall be performed for simple cases, does any do it already? Even with only void setData(std::string arg);, the compiler will move values like temporaries automatically: x.setData(my_string + "more"); // move from temporary std::string x.setData(get_a_string()); // move returned-by-value string As for the ...


1

I wonder if I use the move semantic correctly: By accepting only rvalue referencing you are restricting passing lvalues to this constructor. You would probably find out pretty quickly you can't use this like you would expect. If you accept the types by value... Vertex(Common::Point3D position, Common::Point3D normal, Common::Point2D uv, Common::Point2D ...


3

From ยง12.8/28 [class.copy]: It is unspecified whether subobjects representing virtual base classes are assigned more than once by the implicitly-defined copy/move assignment operator. [ Example: struct V { }; struct A : virtual V { }; struct B : virtual V { }; struct C : B, A { }; It is unspecified whether the virtual base class subobject V is ...


1

Per the Visual Studio 2013 documentation, emphasis mine: "Rvalue references v3.0" adds new rules to automatically generate move constructors and move assignment operators under certain conditions. However, this is not implemented in Visual C++ in Visual Studio 2013, due to time and resource constraints. Visual Studio 2013 is specified as using Rvalue ...


9

Although the type of a is an rvalue reference to A, a itself is an lvalue. To retain its rvalue-ness, you need to use std::move: B(A&& a) noexcept : _a(std::move(a)) {}


4

As implied in the comments, there isn't simply one blanket set of requirements on all objects you store in a vector. Rather, the requirements are placed on specific operations. Although a number of operations do require than the object type be MoveConstructible and/or MoveAssignable, copy construction and copy assignment qualify for meeting that ...


0

Where is it that it states that elements must have move-constructors for std::vector in C++11? A rule like that would break a lot of existing code since existing classes wouldn't necessarily have move constructors. It is probably true that you would need either copy-constructors or if you don't have a copy constructor, then you would be required to at ...



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