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1

One alternative here is to modify the initFrom to accept a "universal reference" to allow reference collapsing and then use std::forward for perfect forwarding. You may then need to re-factor the remaining call hierarchy. class A{ A(const A& a){ initFrom(a); } A(A&& a){ initFrom(a); } template <typename ...


1

This is a typical example for perfect forwarding: template <typename T> A(T && t) { initFrom(std::forward<T>(a)); } template <typename T> void initFrom(T && t) { // other calls initResource(std::forward<T>(t)); } void initResource(A const & rhs) { /* copy from rhs */ } void initResource(A && rhs) ...


0

Someone came up in another forum with that code. It should not lead to potential dangling references, which may be the case with Niall's code. But is still convoluted for something that was legal in C++03 #include <iostream> #include <functional> struct A { A() =default; A(A const& a)=default; A& operator=(A const& ...


6

b.a is an lvalue, so you need to apply std::move: a.init(std::move(b.a)); Note: But why is b an lvalue in the body of B(B&& b)? Here, the parameter type B&& b simply means that this constructor overload will be chosen over, say, B(const B& b) when invoked with an rvalue. B make_B() { return B(); } B b1(make_B()); // ...


5

When should I use move semantics? I presume by this you mean, "When should I give my class a move constructor?" The answer is whenever moving objects of this type is useful and the default move constructor doesn't do the job correctly. Moving is useful when there is some benefit to transferring resources from one object to another. For example, moving is ...


4

As the name indicates, use unique_ptr when there must exist exactly one owner to a resource. The copy constructor of unique_ptr is disabled, which means it is impossible for two instances of it to exist. However, it is movable... Which is fine, since that allows transfer of ownership. Also as the name indicates, shared_ptr represents shared ownership of a ...


2

Following on from the code in the posted comment by dyp, Is there a cast (or standard function) with the opposite effect to `std::move`, the following code snippet compiles. I'm not sure on the usefulness of the code, there was some discussion on whether this was a good idea or not in that linked post. struct A { A() = default; A(A const&) = ...


2

I believe the error is in the return type of mov The code should read #include <utility> #include <memory> template<typename T> typename std::remove_reference<T>::type&& mov(T&& t){ return std::move(t); } int main(){ std::unique_ptr<int> a = std::unique_ptr<int>(new int()); auto b = mov(a); } ...


2

I have finally found a working solution. I think the problem is the return by value which will trigger a copy. Instead I need a return by rvalue reference; then a move will be conducted automatically. First I tried this: template<typename T> T&& mov(T&& t){ return std::move(t); } But now, the problem is that the return type ...


2

We can find a similar exploration of this issue in the article What are const rvalue references good for? and the one use that stood out is this example form the standard library: template <class T> void ref (const T&&) = delete; template <class T> void cref (const T&&) = delete; which disables ref and cref for rvalues ...


1

I see two main uses for ref-qualifying a method. One is like you show in your get() && method, where you use it to select a potentially more efficient implementation that is only available when you know the object will no longer be used. But the other is a safety hint to prevent calling certain methods on temporary objects. You can use notation like ...


20

As alternative to Praetorian's answer, you can use constructor delegate: class C : public B { public: C(std::unique_ptr<A> a) : C(a->x, std::move(a)) // this move doesn't nullify a. {} private: C(int x, std::unique_ptr<A>&& a) : B(x, std::move(a)) // this one does, but we already have copied x {} };


2

Praetorian's suggestion of using list initialization seems to work, but it has a few problems: If the unique_ptr argument comes first, we're out of luck Its way too easy for clients of B to accidentally forget to use {} instead of (). The designers of B's interface has imposed this potential bug on us. If we could change B, then perhaps one better ...


29

Use list initialization to construct B. The elements are then guaranteed to be evaluated from left to right. C(std::unique_ptr<A> a) : B{a->x, std::move(a)} {} // ^ ^ - braces From §8.5.4/4 [dcl.init.list] Within the initializer-list of a braced-init-list, the initializer-clauses, including any that ...


1

Looks correct. Except simple data types like bool, int, char are only copied. The point of "moving" a string is that it has a buffer that it normally has to copy when constructing a new object, however when moving the old buffer is used (copying the pointer and not the contents of the buffer). Test(Test&& other) : ...


5

Initialization and assignment of a primitive from a prvalue or xvalue primitive has exactly the same effect as initialization or assignment from a lvalue primitive; the value is copied and the source object is unaffected. In other words, you can use std::move but it won't make any difference. If you want to change the value of the source object (to 0, say) ...


6

vector<Foo> v{std::move(foo)}; Here you're calling the vector constructor that takes an std::initializer_list. An initializer list only allows const access to its elements, so the vector is going to have to copy each element from the initializer_list to its own storage. That's what causes the call to the copy constructor. From §8.5.4/5 ...


3

The containers try very hard to make sure they remain usable should an exception occur. As part of this, they'll only use std::move internally if your class' move constructor is exception safe. If it is not, (or it can't tell), it will copy just to be safe. The correct move operations are Foo(Foo&&) noexcept {cout << "move ctor" << ...


2

Yes, you're throwing out your move semantics. The most immediate method I can proffer to demonstrate how is by example. This is the sanest thing I could come up with so I hope it is clear what is going on. Consider this: #include <iostream> struct S { int x; S() :x(1) { std::cout << __PRETTY_FUNCTION__ << '\n';} S(const ...


0

This is not what is referred to when people mention "perfect forwarding." This is simply a move constructor calling a copy constructor (which is what I assume you meant). This is perfect forwarding: class Foo{ public: template<typename TBar> Foo(TBar&& bar): m_str(std::forward<TBar>(bar)){} private: std::string m_str; }; What ...


2

Plain English-only attempt The problem is probably too complex to be accurately described by plain English sentences, but one could think of perfect forwarding as a way to move temporary values passed to a function to another one as if the first function didn't exist at all, so without any unnecessary copies or assignments. C++11 allows you to do this by ...


1

Move semantics and prefect forwarding and not directly related, it is often better to think of them as unrelated. Dealing with r-value references and reference collapsing can be more complex than it initially appears. Perfect forwarding Perfect forwarding is there to ensure that the argument provided to a function is forwarded (passed) to another function ...


6

There are two moves that could happen in your program: From the function to the return object. From the return object to model. Both of these moves can be elided by the compiler for the same reason: when a temporary class object that has not been bound to a reference (12.2) would be copied/moved to a class object with the same cv-unqualified type, ...


1

You are a "victim" of Return Value Optimization here. Note this: "In C++, it is particularly notable for being allowed to change the observable behaviour of the resulting program". EDIT: Hence, the compiler is allowed to apply the optimization, even though the side effects of the move-ctor (cout) have been changed.


1

i think this is what you call copy elision (i.e. prevent the copy of an object) and directly use it. See: copy elision: move constructor not called when using ternary expression in return statement?


7

The compiler is eliding the move construction and directly constructing X(3) into c, essentially turning your initialization into X c(3); With gcc, you can disable this using the -fno-elide-constructors switch. Once you add that, the output from your original example is as expected: Constructor Copy Constructor Move Live demo


0

The link from your question and Hinnant's answer both deal with the requirement placed by the standard on implementations of the standard library. There is nothing inherently wrong with a=std::move(a). If a is of class type T, the result of a=std::move(a) depends on the implementation of T. The standard allows the (standard)library implementations to make ...


2

You're violating the convention (which is a requirement for calls to library functions) that rvalue references do not alias. Howard Hinnant's answer, referred to in the question, contains the standard text and the application to self-move. Here's the practical result: It's both legal and common to implement move-assignment as: T& ...


2

Your function id2 does nothing, the code is equivalent to a = std::move(a); The answer from Howard Hinnant you linked explains that this is in itself not allowed. In layman's terms: The standard does not require self-move assignment to be supported. Thus an implementation of a move-assignment operator is not required to perform a test for self-assignment ...


0

This won't work as stated, because list.begin() has type const T *, and there is no way you can move from a constant object. The language designers probably made that so in order to allow initializer lists to contain for instance string constants, from which it would be inappropriate to move. However, if you are in a situation where you know that the ...


4

§17.6.4.9: Each of the following applies to all arguments to functions defined in the C++ standard library, unless explicitly stated otherwise. [...] If a function argument binds to an rvalue reference parameter, the implementation may assume that this parameter is a unique reference to this argument. [ Note: If the parameter is a generic ...


8

You can use reference collapsing and std::forward to forward the argument to the foo function: template <typename T> /* ... */ bar(T&& t) { foo(std::forward<T>(t)); } Please notice that your foo function will accept rvalues, constant lvalues and non-const lvalues. As an example, given: const int x = 456; int y = 123; then: ...


2

The C++ standard unfortunately does not have any special rule to resolve this particular ambiguity. The problem come from the fact that you are trying to overload on 2 different things: the type that the compiler is trying to convert to; and the kind of reference from which you are trying to convert from. By introducing proxy classes, you can split the ...


10

Nikos Athanasiou gave a good answer but I wanted to add this tool that I think is very useful. Here is a screenshot of Howard Hinnant's presentation "Everything You Ever Wanted To Know About Move Semantics (and then some)" from ACCU 2014 conference which I think is a very good reminder of the rules of automatic generation of special members: ...


4

data isn't already pointing at anything because this is the constructor. This is the first thing that happens when the object is created. When constructing this object, it takes ownership of that.data which was allocated by the other object. By assigning 0 to that.data, it ensures that the other object won't delete the data. Now this object is responsible ...


7

Here are some of the differences between move constructors and other constructors: Move constructors can be defaulted Move constructors don't prevent a type from being a "literal type" Non-trivial move constructors prevent a type from being a "trivially copyable type" Move constructors prevent the implicit move constructor from being generated Move ...



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