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0

How about this: std::string Concatenate(const std::string& s1, const std::string& s2, const std::string& s3, const std::string& s4, const std::string& s5) { std::string ret; ret.reserve(s1.length() + s2.length() + s3.length() + ...


4

Angew's answer is right but who can remember all the language lawyer rules? To help me remember it easier I wrote the following rules which came from STL's own mouth. 15) Don't return locals as const [16] $ Inhibits move semantics 16) Don't use move when returning local by value of exact same type [16] $ NVRO won't be used if you do ...


10

In your case, returnedStr will be move-constructed from the return value of GetString(), but that return value will be copy-constructed from str(1). If str wasn't const, the return value would be move-constructed from it. Note that in both cases, return value optimisation is still applicable, so the compiler can still construct the return value (or even str ...


3

It looks as though you're doing move semantics wrong. You should return by value, not by rvalue reference, and let the move constructor ensure that returning by value is efficient. Otherwise you risk returning a dangling reference to an object that no longer exists. The point of move semantics is to make passing objects by value cheap, rvalue references ...


4

There is no engineering like over engineering. In this case, I create a type string_builder::op<?> that reasonably efficiently collects a pile of strings to concatenate, and when cast into a std::string proceeds to do so. It stores copies of any temporary std::strings provided, and references to longer-lived ones, as a bit of paranoia. It ends up ...


12

The premise of the question that: s1 + s2 + s3 + s4 + s5 + ... + sn will require n allocations is incorrect. Instead it will require O(Log(n)) allocations. The first s1 + s1 will generate a temporary. Subsequently a temporary (rvalue) will be the left argument to all subsequent + operations. The standard specifies that when the lhs of a string + is an ...


1

You can use code like: std::string(s1) + s2 + s3 + s4 + s5 + s6 + .... This will allocates a single unnamed temporary (copy of the first string), and then append each of the other strings to it. A smart optimizer could optimize this into the same code as the reserve+append code others have posted, as all these functions are generally inlineable. This ...


0

After some thought, I think it might be worth at least considering a slightly different approach. std::stringstream s; s << s1 << s2 << s3 << s4 << s5; return s.str(); Although it doesn't guarantee only a single allocation, we can expect a stringstream to be optimized for accumulating relatively large amounts of data, so ...


7

std::string combined; combined.reserve(s1.size() + s2.size() + s3.size() + s4.size() + s5.size()); combined += s1; combined += s2; combined += s3; combined += s4; combined += s5; return combined;


3

I consider a missing std::move() where a non-trivial object can be moved but the compilers can't detect that this is the case to be an error in the code. That is, the std::move() in the constructor is mandatory: clearly, the temporary object the constructor is called with is about to go out of scope, i.e., it can be safely moved from. On the other hand, ...


2

I'm similarly nonplussed by this issue. As far as I can tell, the best current idiom is to divide the pass-by-value into a pair of pass-by-references. template< typename t > std::decay_t< t > val( t && o ) // Given an object, return a new object "val"ue by move or copy { return std::forward< t >( o ); } Result ...


0

No, you don't have. I'll be automatically generated like default/copy constructor. From this page, Implicitly-declared move constructor If no user-defined move constructors are provided for a class type (struct, class, or union), and all of the following is true: there are no user-declared copy constructors there are no user-declared copy ...


0

According to the standard (N3797) 12.8/9 Copying and moving class objects [class.copy]: If the definition of a class X does not explicitly declare a move constructor, one will be implicitly declared as defaulted if and only if — X does not have a user-declared copy constructor, — X does not have a user-declared copy assignment operator, — ...


3

The compiler will generate a default move constructor if you don't specify one in the base class (except some cases, e.g. there's a base class with a deleted move constructor) but you should, in any case, call explicitly the base class' one if you have it: Sub(Sub&& o) : Base(std::move(o))


0

Your code does not make much sense as it would be logically equal to this: Foo bar( std::move( 123 ) ); There is no point to move constant, and string literal is a constant. Better question would be, and I think is that what you really meant by your question: class Foo { ... }; class Bar { public: Bar( const Foo &foo ); Bar( Foo ...


0

If that's even legal and I don't know if it is, it is not optimising anything. The literal is created at compile time in static space. It can't be moved. string will always own a copy of the data and not just "refer" to it.


3

No, there's no point moving a string literal. It's a static array (not a "temporary that's constructed"), which can't be moved, only copied.


0

If I get you right, you want to "move" the vector in a class member via a constructor call. In C++11 you would have to provide a constructor with std::vector<T>&& argument and call Foo my_foo(std::move(my_vector)); In C++03 you can add a "named constructor" or a friend which does this job for you. template <class T> class Foo { ...


4

You could define a type wrapping a reference, and a function to wrap it, to give something similar to move semantics at the call site. Something along the lines of template <typename T> struct move_ref { explicit move_ref(T & ref) : ref(ref) {} T & ref; }; template <typename T> move_ref<T> move(T & t) {return ...


0

C++03 way is to use std::auto_ptr to express passing ownership of the data class Foo { public: explicit Foo(std::auto_ptr<std::vector<int> > vec) : m_vec(vec) { } private: Foo(const Foo&); Foo& operator=(const Foo&); std::auto_ptr<std::vector<int> > m_vec; }; // usage: ...


3

Sure it is possible to have move semantics in C++03. Using Boost.Move: #include <vector> #include <utility> #include <boost/move/move.hpp> class Foo { public: Foo(BOOST_RV_REF(std::vector<int>) vec) { std::swap(vec, m_vec); // "move" vec into member vector } private: std::vector<int> m_vec; }; int ...


5

You may use some wrapper with explicit name: template <typename T> class MyMove { public: explicit MyMove(T& t) : t(t) {} T& get() {return t;} private: T& t; }; template <typename T> MyMove<T> myMove(T& t) { return MyMove<T>(t); } And then class Foo { public: ...


0

Sean Parents answers this question in a comment of his in this link. Lets say that you have a class Foo with an assignment operator as the example below: class Foo { Foo& operator=(Foo o) noexcept { member = move(o.member); return *this; } }; And wrap a Foo object in a struct, say struct wrap like in the example below: struct wrap { ...


2

Just do class mapContainer { public: mapContainer(map<int, unique_ptr<int> > smallMap) : smallMap_(std::move(smallMap)) { } private: const map<int, unique_ptr<int> > smallMap_; }; Live example


6

The second version, the one taking a reference, is a tiny bit more efficient, since there's no separate object constructed for the function parameter. You would find this kind of style in generic library code where you don't want to impose any unnecessary cost on the user. The first version is a bit easier to read and to remember, and allows the slightly ...


2

worker = std::thread (&Directory::working_loop,this); Here be danger when moving... The thread of execution is bound to a member function on a specific instance of on object. If the object changes location in memory, all sorts of trouble awaits your thread. Don't just move it. You don't show the implementation of the thread's function ...



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