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7

Install the SAME MPI implementation and version on ALL systems where the job will run. Mixing implementations in a single job in the manner described it not supported.


6

It is basically a "modern" c++ interface to the same old C API that is implemented in, say MPICH. Since it is using the same functions it cannot lead to any performance improvement but might help with the actual implementation by making it easier.


6

The command you run to start your application with MPICH is mpiexec, so the way to check the version is: mpiexec --version


5

The classic examples are: NAS Parallel Benchmarks - they are representative numerical kernels that you'd see in a lot of scientific computing applications. These admittedly have a lot of computation but also have the communications patterns you'd expect to see in real applications, so they are fairly relevant. Or, if you really just want MPI ...


5

MPI - all implementations - have had the ability to continue after an error for a while. The default is to die - that is, the default error handler is MPI_ERRORS_ARE_FATAL - but that can be set (eg, see the discussion here). But the standard doesn't currently much beyond that; that is, it's hard to recover and continue after such an error. If your ...


5

Boost.MPI provides an alternative C++ interface to MPI that better supports modern C++ development styles, including complete support for user-defined data types and C++ Standard Library types, arbitrary function objects for collective algorithms, and the use of modern C++ library techniques. It intends to maintain maximal efficiency but not to ...


5

Two different MPI implementations get mixed in your case. The run-time MPI environment comes from a different implementation that the one used to compile the program and therefore both processes behave as MPI singletons, i.e. each of them forms a separate MPI_COMM_WORLD communicator and becomes rank 0 in it. As a result the first branch of the conditional ...


4

Its possible to do this. Most MPI implementations allow you to specify the location of the binary to be run on different machines. Alternatively, make sure that it is in your path on both machines. Since both machines have the same byte order, that shouldn't be a problem. You will have to make sure that any input data that the individual processes read ...


4

From the point of view of where I work, the biggest single advance is scalability of process launching. Launching 8000+ task jobs with the previous process launchers in MPICH2-based MPI implementations was unusably slow and would frequently fail due to timeouts or other network problems, which all but ruled out MPICH2-based MPIs for our largest jobs. But ...


4

For MPI processes your # of processes should match the sum of the core count of your machines (assuming a CPU-heavy workload). If an MPI process runs with -np 4 on a quad-core box, it will consume all four cores and you'll see your CPU usage near 100%. If it runs with -np 1 the CPU load of the box is going to be around 25% (because only one core out of four ...


4

MPI is a standard: it outlines a particular model for message passing in a distributed system. However, it only gives a series of requirements: it does not actually include any code, nor does it specify how exactly these requirements need to be fulfilled. For example, take a look at this excerpt from the official MPI 2.2 spec (as of today): A valid MPI ...


4

I have the same problem on Ubuntu 12.04. I find my problem is because I have both open-mpi and mpich2 on my computer. When I compile my program using mpicc, it will be linked to open-mpi not mpich2. To fix this problem, you can use "mpicc.mpich2" to compile your program and then use "mpiexec.mpich2" to execute your code.


4

The following diagnostic procedure assumes that MPICH/MPICH2 and Open MPI are the only possible MPI implementations that you may have linked with. Other (especially commercial) MPI implementations do exist and may have different library names and/or library symbols. First determine if you linked dynamically: % ldd my_executable linux-vdso.so.1 ...


4

Yes, MPI allows a process to send data to itself but one has to be extra careful about possible deadlocks when blocking operations are used. In that case one usually pairs a non-blocking send with blocking receive or vice versa, or one uses calls like MPI_Sendrecv. Sending a message to self usually ends up with the message simply being memory-copied from the ...


3

I completely agree with Jonathan about the substantial improvement in job startup times. In addition though, hydra is generally much more useful and more robust than previous process managers in nearly every aspect. It launches more reliably, has more features (process-core binding, format-based output file redirection, resource manager and batch scheduler ...


3

J Teller's right; MPI doesn't really do this, and it shouldn't. That's a design decision based on the use case of MPI. MPI users are the sorts of people who pay lots of money for interconnects with sub-microseconds latency. The overhead of some sort of cryptographic signing of messages would be completely unacceptable for this community. And it ...


3

Firstly, do you really mean to receive an MPI_CHAR into chunkP - an int - shouldn't you receive an MPI_INT? The messages from ranks 1:4 will not get lost - they will get queued until rank 0 chooses to receive them. This behaviour is mandated by the MPI standard. If the messages are large enough, ranks 1:4 may block until they can actually send their ...


3

Note that a feature that has existed since MPI 1.x days is that you can set an error handler: eg, http://www.mpi-forum.org/docs/mpi-11-html/node148.html As Mark notes, most of us just use MPI_ERRORS_ARE_FATAL (which is the default) because our algorithms are very state-heavy and can't easily be recovered (except through checkpointing, which most of us do ...


3

Which communicators are being used doesn't affect the number of TCP connections that are established. For --with-device=ch3:nemesis:tcp (the default configuration), you will use one bidirectional TCP connection between each pair of processes that directly communicate via point-to-point MPI routines. In your example, this means 6 connections. If you use ...


3

Unfortunately, MPICH2 does not support heterogeneous platforms. You could build MPICH2 and your application for 32-bit and run that on all machines.


3

As suszterpatt points out, you really want to allocate your block of B in one big chunk; that's probably better for performance anyway but it's really required for any communications so you're not chasing pointers everywhere. And I think one way or another you're probably going to have to do it in different sends -- sending size information, then the data ...


3

The problem is your subroutine has no idea what mpi_comm_world is. This integer value is set in the mpif.h header (or the mpi module for f90). As your code is written, mpi_comm_world is assigned randomly by the compiler and has no association with the actual mpi_comm_world communicator handle provided by mpi. Generally, it's best to use implicit none in ...


3

You have more than one mpiexec.exe files from different vendors in you system. For example, one from c:\program files\mpich2\bin and one from c:\program files\microsoft hpc pack 2008 r2\bin. Try to disable one of them.


3

Add the connected machines to a hostfile and pass the file to the mpiexec: <path-to-mpich2>/bin/mpiexec.exe -machinefile hosts.cfg -n nPEs <your-executable> Check sections 5.4 and 9 from the MPICH user's guide. Update: Yes, you need to install the MPI library on each machine. Moreover, you need to start the process manager daemon on each ...


3

Torque and Hydra are two completely separate things. Torque is a distributed resource manager that allows execution in batch mode of tasks (jobs) on a network of compute systems. Hydra is part of MPICH and is responsible for launching and controlling processes that are part of the MPI job. The way Torque and Hydra work together is that one submits a job to ...


3

You've almost got it right except that indices is supposed to give the offset of each structure field in bytes from the beginning of the structure. The correct way to construct such a type would be to use the offsetof operator, defined in stddef.h: #include <stddef.h> // or <cstddef> for C++ struct Residence { double x; double y; }; ...


3

This error indicates that there's a problem resolving localhost. Check your /etc/hosts file, make certain that you have localhost correctly defined here, it should be pointing to 127.0.0.1. Try using ssh to connect to localhost, make sure that works as well.


3

As John said, your array is too big because it can no longer be described by an int variable. When this is the case, you have a few options. Use multiple MPI calls to send your data. For this option, you would just divide your data up into chunks smaller than 2^31 and send them individually until you've received everything. Use MPI datatypes. With this ...


3

The MPICH configure scripts are checking how the compiler aligns both members of a struct, and the struct itself. struct { char a; float b; } char_float; struct { float b; char a; } float_char; struct { char a; double b; } char_double; struct { double b; char a; } double_char; All four of those might have different alignment or padding. I think you ...


2

What is your distribution or OS? My Debian / Ubuntu systems have it as a softlink to mpic++.openmpi (which comes from the libopenmpi-dev package). So I use Open MPI; the MPICH2 packages provide the same softlink.



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