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3

Your second attempt almost has it. The only change is that the input to the colormap cm.jet() needs to be on the range of 0 to 1. You can scale your z values to fit this range with Normalize. import numpy as np from matplotlib import pyplot as plt from mpl_toolkits.mplot3d import Axes3D from matplotlib import colors fig = plt.figure() ax = ...


3

I needed something similar: drawing the zaxis on both sides. Thanks to the answer by @crayzeewulf I came to following workaround (for left, righ, or both sides): First plot your 3d as you need, then before you call show() wrap the Axes3D with a Wrapper class that simply overrides the draw() method. The Wrapper Class calls simply sets the visibility of ...


2

Yes, there is a possibility. There is a possibility of everything in Matlab! Lets Google and find: cylinder()! Fantastic, Matlab has a function to generate cylinders! And... That's it. Go plot them wherever you want. Fun: clear;clc; cmap = hsv(10); for ii=1:10 hold on [X,Y,Z]=cylinder(rand(1,1)*0.4); ...


2

Your code works just fine, here's a bit of a sample. Basically, this is your code with a custom X set. fig = plot.figure(); ax = fig.gca(projection = '3d') X = [(0,0,0,1,0),(0,0,1,0,0),(0,1,0,0,0)] points = np.array([X[0], X[1], X[2]]).T.reshape(-1, 1, 3) r = [(1.0, 1.0, 1.0, 1.0), (1.0, 0.75, 0.75, 1.0), (1.0, 0.5, 0.5, 1.0), (1.0, 0.25, 0.25, 1.0), (1.0, ...


2

Sure, you'll just need to make separate plot calls for each point. However, because each point will have a different marker, things will render rather slowly. If you have several thousand points, this is probably a bad idea. However, at that point, you wouldn't be able to see the numbers, anyway. As an example: import numpy as np import ...


2

Try mayavi.mlab.triangular_mesh() import numpy as np from mayavi import mlab vertices = np.array([[0, 1, 0, 0],[0, 0, 1, 0],[0, 0, 0, 1]]) faces = np.array([[0, 1, 0, 0],[1, 2, 1, 2],[2, 3, 3, 3]]) mlab.triangular_mesh(vertices[0,:], vertices[1,:], vertices[2,:], faces.T) mlab.show()


1

If you still have the this is problem, try to manually alter the respective Path objects. You should modify the code of the very last vertex to STOP (code 0): from mpl_toolkits.mplot3d import Axes3D from matplotlib.collections import PolyCollection from matplotlib.colors import colorConverter import matplotlib.pyplot as plt import numpy as np zs = [] fig = ...


1

Based on your comment: I have created 3 plots for every coordinates for A and B. I want to show x, y and z coordinates in one graph only for A and B. how can I show that? I believe what you are looking for is this: A = [[44.254, 44.114, 44.353, 44.899, 45.082],[-0.934, 0.506, 1.389, 0.938, 0.881],[44.864, 45.225, 44.005, 42.981, 46.356]] t1 = [0, ...


1

if you want to show the 3d displacement of A, B, use module mpl_toolkits.mplot3d A = [[44.254, 44.114, 44.353, 44.899, 45.082],[-0.934, 0.506, 1.389, 0.938, 0.881],[44.864, 45.225, 44.005, 42.981, 46.356]] t1 = [0, 1.4911475447, 1.5248639284, 1.2450273089, 3.3804382852] B = [[44.254, 48.4877582254, 43.0268091866, 47.3166368948, 47.7110371397], [-0.934, ...


1

import pylab def scatterme(x, y, z): pylab.figure() imi = pylab.scatter(x, y, c = z, edgecolor = "none") pylab.colorbar(imi) pylab.show() In this case, my x and y are what for you would be X.flatten() and Y.flatten() and the z would be your x.flatten(). This code also works if your data does not come from something square, so if you just ...


1

Since you've set the alpha to zero and aren't plotting the surface tiles, you might want to consider using plot_wireframe instead, where color sets the line color (rather than the tile color as in plot_surface). But as Jakob suggested, edgecolors will also work.


1

How to find the required keywords: The plot_surface method creates a Poly3DCollection which is based on PolyCollections. Latter receive the keywords like edgecolors (or facecolors). In your example: ax.plot_surface(x,y,U,rstride=1,cstride=1,alpha=0,linewidth=0.5, edgecolors='r')


1

Wow, so it turns out the problem was that X was actually not of shape (3, n), but rather something like (3, n^10), but I was only plotting n points, hence the color appeared to never change (and why r seems to have extremely small intervals...there were something like 58,000 points when I was plotting only 250). So yes, it was a bug. Sorry about that; it ...


1

You can use the scatter3D() method of the Axes3DSubplot object: from mpl_toolkits.mplot3d import Axes3D fig = plt.figure() ax = fig.add_subplot(111, projection='3d') ax.scatter3D(data[:,1], data[:,2], data[:,7], c='r', marker='0')


1

Sort of, you can run this snippet of code before you plot: import numpy from mpl_toolkits.mplot3d import proj3d def orthogonal_proj(zfront, zback): a = (zfront+zback)/(zfront-zback) b = -2*(zfront*zback)/(zfront-zback) return numpy.array([[1,0,0,0], [0,1,0,0], [0,0,a,b], ...


1

As suggested by mrcl, to do this in matplotlib you can use trisurf. However, you have to provide your own triangles as Delaunay won't work on the 2d projection of your points. To build the triangulation, I suggest to build a parametric representation of your surfece (in terms of s, t) and triangulate in the space (s, t). It will give something like this ...


1

You can set antialiased argument of plot_trisurf() to False. Here is the result:


1

I think the folowwing will do: ax.set_xticks([16,32,64,128])


1

I had the exact problem, here is how I had it solved (in my case): 1) rename (or delete) the folder mplot3d (so matplotlib thinks it's not there): /System/Library/Frameworks/Python.framework/Versions/2.7/Extras/lib/python/mpl_toolkits/mplot3d-old 2) update matplotlib with specifiying mplot3d: pip install --upgrade matplotlib[mplot3d]



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