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6

I'm trying to use Microsoft Solver Foundation in my C# application in VS2010 Ultimate. I've installed MSF (64 bit version) and as far as I understand I should be able to use the services after declaring: using Microsoft.SolverFoundation; How can I integrate MSF into my C# application? At no point did you mention that you added a reference to this ...


6

You can use Model.Power method. Math.Pow is for doubles only. error1 = Model.Power(error1, 2); error2 = Model.Power(error2, 2);


5

I've already tried adding the references before but it wouldn't work. Now I've noticed something in the warnings (which I probably didn't see before): "The referenced assembly "Microsoft.Solver.Foundation, Version=3.0.1.10599, Culture=neutral, PublicKeyToken=31bf3856ad364e35, processorArchitecture=MSIL" could not be resolved because it has a dependency on ...


5

The problem is that the Term class overrides the equality operator in a way that it doesn't return bool but another Term instead: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ff525374%28v=vs.93%29.aspx I am not sure why they would do something like this, because it goes against any advice on overriding operators... To fix your problem, use this code instead: ...


5

I've just installed VS 2012 on my computer. I also have VS 2010 installed. I've re-installed Solver Foundation, but still no such project type in VS 2012 (unlike VS 2010). I would also like to know how to add this project type to the templates in VS 2012. However, this might help you: it is enough to add the reference in your project to the ...


4

Well it turns out Microsoft Solver Foundation does not support non-linear programming. As of Jan 2010, the team's official word on this is that they are considering it but that it is not in their immediate plans. So I have settled on AMPL as the modelling language interface and KNITRO for the solver algorithm. KNITRO looks good because it apparantly ...


4

The Microsoft.Solver.Foundation assembly is primarily targeted at .NET 4 and is thus included in the .NET 4 reference assemblies, as is also indicated by MSt:s answer. This means that if you create a project that targets .NET 4.0, the Microsoft.Solver.Foundation assembly will show up in the Assemblies / Framework list when you are adding a new reference in ...


4

Here's my TL;DR summary: He doesn't know how to minimize the return value of LinearTrial, which takes an array of doubles. Each value in this array has its own min/max value, and he's modeling that using Decisions. If that's correct, it seems you could just do the following: double[] minimums = Parameters.Select(p => p.Value.Item1).ToArray(); double[] ...


4

A quick fix is to redefine != operator. It will override other != operators so it's best to keep it in the smallest scope possible. For example, I would keep it in a solve function: let solve args = ... let (!=) (x: Decision) (y: Decision) = Term.op_Inequality(x, y) model.AddConstraints("borders", be != de, be != fr, be != nl, de != ...


4

(Note: no new releases of Solver Foundation are forthcoming - it's essentially been dropped by Microsoft.) The stack trace indicates that this is a bug in the simplex solver's presolve routine. Unfortunately the SimplexDirective does not have a way to disable presolve (unlike InteriorPointDirective). Therefore the way to get around this problem is to ...


3

I've never used Solver Foundation before, but here is a straightforward translation from C# example in MSDN (adapted to your optimization function): open System open Microsoft.SolverFoundation.Common open Microsoft.SolverFoundation.Solvers let xInitial = [| 0.; 0. |] let xLower = [| 0.; 0. |] let xUpper = [| 2.; 2. |] let sqr x = x * x let solution = ...


3

You can do this with Solver Foundation but there is no equivalent for the "sec" keyword. Instead you can add a dummy 0-1 decision for each semi-integer variable. For your original example involving "V", here's how you could do it in OML: Model[ Decisions[ Integers[0, 1], VPositive ], Decisions[ Reals, V ], Constraints[ ...


3

I think CompactQuasiNewtonSolver is your best bet. If you take a look at SolverFoundation's samples, there is CQN sample which demonstrates how to implement and solve the Rosenbrock function. Its results are inline with what I see in minFunc's Rosenbrock example. The sample above is in C#; but it should be easy to translate to F#. Also, are there any ...


3

It is as simple as that: static Term objfunc(Decision x, Decision y) { return 5 * x + 20 * y; } Rather than returning a double, the function has to return a Term.


2

I've tried Solver Foundation on a problem I tried (unsuccessfully) to solve in the past, and cracked it in 2 days, including learning of Solver API. Solver performance is great, and SFS (Solver Foundation Services) API is AWESOME.


2

You would get huge benefits by switching to C#/LINQ in terms of working with the XML and even with a lot of the math. There would be a slight learning curve (so that's a con), but in just a couple of weeks, I'm sure you'll be laughing at how much easier coding C#3/LINQ is. I say this from experience... and I specifically mentioned "C#3" (as opposed to just ...


2

Create an adjustable cell, Y and restrict it to be an integer. Set the equation that you are trying to minimize equal to Y^2.


2

Since you say you have 8 hours, and each lecture must be exactly 1 hour long, can’t you just model the 8 hours as “slots” that you put the teachers “into”? It seems equivalent to assigning people to cinema seats or similar (except of course that each teacher can have two time slots).


2

The problem is a little more complicated than I first thought. Like I mentioned above, you need to calculate dispersion. However, calculation of standard deviation of geographical points is not simple. Here is a MathWorks explanation. It seems that if your points don't span a large geographic area, you can approximate the dispersion by calculating the ...


2

It seems to be a version problem. When running the same problem in the latest release (standard edition) of MSF, the solver reports the problem as Infeasible. Apart from this, the report lists the same properties as the report from 3.0 above, just not the decision values. So yes, it seems like there is some kind of bug in MSF 3.0. To overcome this bug, try ...


2

It seems like the solver that is applied to this problem is hampered by the extent of the Decision domain. If you limit the domain to for example the integer range [0, 10]: m.AddDecision(new Decision(Domain.IntegerRange(0, 10), "a")); m.AddDecision(new Decision(Domain.IntegerRange(0, 10), "b")); a feasible solution to the problem is generated fairly ...


2

I guess you don't need solver foundation for that. There is no need in numerical optimization, because the solution (the vector of the polynomial coefficients which minimizes the sum of squared vertical distances between the observed responses in the dataset and the predicted responses) exists in a closed form. See wikipedia for details.


2

The main disadvantage is that Microsoft Solver Foundation is discontinued as a standalone product as mentioned here: As users have pointed out, Microsoft has not been active on the Solver Foundation forums since Nate left. We have been quiet while we have gone through restructuring and planning. Some would say we have been too quiet. We know we ...


2

Not sure what you mean exactly by: the solver "could work in Visual Studio IDE?" However, if you want a large-scale (open-source) LP solver with a functional C# interface, I would recommend lp_solve, downloads are here. The solver is written in C/C++, but there is a comprehensive and easy-to-use C# wrapper which uses P/Invoke to call the various lpsolve ...


2

The Solver Foundation samples do not appear to contain any explicit Nelder-Mead examples in C#. However, you can easily test Nelder-Mead in the SineX sample by replacing the compact Quasi-Newton solver and parameters with their Nelder-Mead correspondents: var solver = new NelderMeadSolver(); ... var param = new NelderMeadSolverParams();


2

What you need to do is use the full names of the Decision:s rather than the names of the variables, and let the AddConstraint(string, string) overload do the parsing for you. Like this: string theTerm = "(20 * barrels_saudiarabia) + (15 * barrels_venezuela) + (3 * barrels_saudiarabiad)"; model.AddConstraint("Name_of_constraint", theTerm); ...


2

Offhand, that looks okay to me... Is it possible that you've shadowed the original definition of var somehow? For instance, the following self-contained example works fine for me: let var<'a>() = Unchecked.defaultof<'a> match <@ var<int>() @> with | Quotations.DerivedPatterns.SpecificCall <@ var @> (obj,_,[]) -> ...


2

I have a VS 2012 Express and I was getting a "BadImage" error with the lpsolve55.dll / LpSolvePlugIn.dll. I then compared to the C# example (lp_solve_5.5.2.0_cs.net.zip at http://sourceforge.net/projects/lpsolve/files/lpsolve/5.5.2.0/) and found out that, as soon I changed the project Properties / Application / Target Network from 4.5 to ".NET Framework ...


2

I finally worked it out. I got my hands on MSF standard 3.0.2 64bits. Compiled the LPSolvePlugin code (from http://www.peno.be/MSF/) in a 64bit machine using lpsolve55.dll for 64 bits (got it from http://sourceforge.net/projects/lpsolve/) Copied the lpsolveplugin.dll and the lpsolve55.dll to the plugins folder of msf added the following in the web.config ...


2

Historically it was available as a purchase from Gurobi. However the software is now defunct(*) and I no longer see it on their site. You can see how it used to look here. You might try contacting them directly. (*)In May 2012 last year, the Solver Foundation team wrote: The current 3.1 release of MSF will be the last release as a standalone install. We ...



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