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mtrace.c #include <mcheck.h> #include <unistd.h> #include <stdlib.h> #include <string.h> #include <stdio.h> void __mtracer_on () __attribute__((constructor)); void __mtracer_off () __attribute__((destructor)); void __mtracer_on () { char *p=getenv("MALLOC_TRACE"); char tracebuf[1023]; if(!p) ...


3

You're looking at the direct output of mtrace, which is extremely confusing and counterintuitive. Luckily, there is a perl script (called mtrace, found within glibc-utils) which can very easily help the parsing of this output. Compile your build with debugging on, and run mtrace like such: $ gcc -g -o test test.c $ MALLOC_TRACE=mtrace.out ./test $ mtrace ...


2

The function that is allocating the memory is being called more than once. The caller address points to the code that did the allocation, and that code is simply being run more than once. Here is an example in C: void *allocate (void) { return (malloc(1000)); } int main() { mtrace(); allocate(); allocate(); } The output from mtrace is: Memory ...


2

Here's a recipe for reproducing this on my regular desktop Linux system (FC-17): #include <mcheck.h> #include <pthread.h> extern "C" { static void *run(void *) { return 0; } } int main() { mtrace(); pthread_t thread; pthread_create(&thread, 0, run, 0); pthread_join(thread, 0); return 0; } Compiled with g++ -g -static -pthread. ...


1

I have experience with debugging Fortran programs but to be honest I could not really understand your question. I think it is because I do not have much of C/C++ debugging experience which different to Fortran. Nevertheless I think this will benefit you: Using the Intel compiler with the following compile options will detect almost any memory leak , wrong ...


1

Steve Kargl had the answer, which briefly is that mtrace does not find any leak, because there isn't any leak if the compiler conforms to the standard: See http://gcc.gnu.org/ml/fortran/2008-11/msg00163.html for details. In fact I'm not a big fortran expert (I'm mostly C/C++/java guy), and I was also using another compiler, which DOES leak in such a ...


1

I'm not an expert on mtrace, so I can't help with that. I would suggest that you try the valgrind tool to find memory-leaks if you are using a supported system. Using valgrind for finding memory-leaks is as simple as calling valgrind --leak-check=full ./a.out.



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