Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

12

It's TCP - you should treat the data as a stream. You shouldn't care how the stream is broken up into packets, or make assumptions about it. If you need to receive a single "block" of data, the simplest way to do that reliably is to prefix it with the length (e.g. as a 32-bit value). You read the length (noting that even those bytes could be split across ...


11

The following doesn't answer your question directly but you might find it interesting; it says that IP packets can be disassembled/reassembled, and therefore bigger than limit on the underling media (e.g. 1500-byte Ethernet): Resolve IP Fragmentation, MTU, MSS, and PMTUD Issues with GRE and IPSEC More on this topic: Re: UDP fragmentation says you should ...


9

Trying to control the size of frames when using TCP from the user application is wrong. You are working at the wrong abstraction level. It's also impossible. What you should be doing is either consider replacing TCP with something else (UDP?) or, less likely, but possible, rewrite your Ethernet driver to set the non standard MTU and do the padding you need. ...


9

TLDR: Both. It will only transmit packets with a payload length less than or equal to that size. Similarly, it will only accept packets with a payload length within your MTU. If a device sends a larger packet, it should respond with an ICMP unreachable (oversized) message. The nitty gritty: Tuning the MTU for your device is useful because other hops ...


6

ifconfig ... mtu <value> sets the MTU for layer2 payloads sent out the interface, and will reject larger layer2 payloads received on this interface. You must ensure your MTU matches on both sides of an ethernet link; you should not have mismatched mtu values anywhere in the same ethernet broadcast domain. Note that the ethernet headers are not ...


6

I hope I'm right with my assumption, that data is sent always No, a TCP stack typically bundles up data and send big segments (it doesn't wait forever though, often just a little while) - usually Nagles algorithm or some variant is employed. There might be other concerns too that impact how data are buffered up and sent, e.g. how congested the network ...


6

If you are using TCP then the interface presented to you is that of a stream of bytes. You don't need to worry about how the stream of bytes gets from one end of the connection to the other. You can ignore the IP layer's MTU. In fact you can ignore the IP layer entirely. When you call send() the TCP stack on your machine will deal with all the details ...


5

In addition to all the previous answers, quoting the classic: IPv4 and IPv6 define minimum reassembly buffer size, the minimum datagram size that we are guaranteed any implementation must support. For IPv4, this is 576 bytes. IPv6 raises this to 1,500 bytes. ... This pretty much means that you want to limit your datagram size to under 576 if you work ...


5

Have a read of 9.2.4 When dissecting an application layer protocol you cannot assume that each TCP packet contains exactly one application layer message. One application layer message can be split into several TCP packets.


5

This isn't possible using the TCP stack of the host simply because a TCP stack that follows RFC 793 isn't supposed to offer this kind of access to an application. That is, there isn't (and there shouldn't be) a way to influence what the lower layers do with your data. Of course, there are ways to influence what TCP does (Nagle for example) but that is ...


5

Its possible that VM1 has cached PMTU information. By default the timeout for these cache entries is 10 minutes. You can change the timeout by writing to /proc/sys/net/ipv4/route/mtu_expires (seconds). For your experiment, try flushing the cache (deleting PMTU cache) before sending out 1500 byte packets: echo "0" > /proc/sys/net/ipv4/route/flush ...


4

The MTU is the largest payload size that could be handed to the link layer; it does not include any link-layer headers, so, for example, on Ethernet it would be 1500, not 1514 or 1518, and wouldn't be large enough to capture a full-sized Ethernet packet. In addition, it doesn't include any metadata headers such as the radiotap header for 802.11 radio ...


3

You could set the "Don't Fragment" Flag in the IP Header. You then may get an icmp response about needed Fragmentation.


3

No, there is no generic POSIX function for that. The best you can do is to invoke a GET_MTU / SIOCGIFMTU ioctl on the socket, but this is not in the POSIX standard. not supported by all POSIX.


3

There is a minimum MTU that must be supported - 576 bytes, including IP headers. So if you keep your packets below that, you don't have to worry about PMTU-D (that's what DNS does).


3

There are local MTU size and Path MTU (see RFC 1191). You can use commands like ping -f -l 1464 www.stackoverflow.com ping -f -l 1465 www.stackoverflow.com to determine a Path MTU. Take in consideration the header size of ICMP packages and IP headers. See http://stackoverflow.com/questions/1605084/path-mtu-discovery for API solution. UPDATED: Please no ...


3

The MTU of an IP packet is the entire packet, including all IP and higher level headers. Lower level headers (Ethernet frames etc) are not included (they're not IP's concern), but they do obviously influence the MTU since it's defined by the lower level.


2

You can set the SIOCSIFMTU field in an ioctl call, something like this: struct ifreq ifr; ifr.ifr_addr.sa_family = AF_INET;//address family strncpy(ifr.ifr_name, "eth0", sizeof(ifr.ifr_name));//interface name where you want to set the MTU ifr.ifr_mtu = 9100; //your MTU size here if (ioctl(sockfd, SIOCSIFMTU, (caddr_t)&ifr) < 0) //failed to set ...


2

the MTU in your enviroment is being set automatically via the DHCP, in your configuration you have this setting: DEVICE=eth0 BOOTPROTO=dhcp So the DHCP is actually setting the MTU size. In Ubuntu, you can edit the following file: /etc/dhcp/dhclient.conf Just BEFORE the request line set this two commands: default interface-mtu 1500; supercede ...


2

This answer was taken from http://books.google.co.il/books?id=9HGUc8AO2xQC&pg=PA31&lpg=PA31&dq#v=onepage&q&f=false (page 31) s = socket.socket(socket.AF_INET,socket.SOCK_DGRAM) hostName = #ip here PORT = 9999 s.connect(hostName, Port) s.setsockopt(socket.IPPROTO_IP, IN.IP_MTU_DISCOVER, IN.IP_PMTUDISC_DO) try: s.send('#' * 1473) ...


2

This is an interesting topic for me. Perhaps some practical results might be of interest when delivering chunky UDP data around the real world internet via UDP, and with a transmission rate of 1 packet a second, data continues to turn up with minimal packet loss up to about 2K. Over this and you start running into issues, but regularly we delivered 1600+ ...


2

Your own MTU is available in the registry, but the MTU in practice is going to the smallest MTU in the path between your machine and the destination. Its both variable and can only be determined empirically. There are a number of RFCs showing how to determine it. LAN's can internally have very large MTU values, since the network hardware is typically ...


2

In addition to my comments below the OP's question, this quote from the original RFC outlining how to send TCP/IP over ethernet is relevant: RFC 894 (emphasis mine): If necessary, the data field should be padded (with octets of zero) to meet the Ethernet minimum frame size. If they wanted all ethernet frames to be at maximum size, they would have ...


2

The MTU is a number which defines the maximum transmission unit per packet. The bigger it is, the faster your data will be sent. Assuming you can send npackets/s of msize, if m grows, m*n grows too. I think your client wants that MTU because of its network equipment (maybe ethernet 802.3). Some equipment handel biggest frames size than others. You can use ...


2

It's not about speed directly; By increasing MTU you're reducing overhead, which is data that is responsible for the proper delivery of the package but it's not usable by the end user; This can have a increase in speed but only for heavy traffic; Also, if you increase MTU, you're prone to increase the number of packets that are dropped (since you have a ...


2

If the socket is created such that DF set on outgoing packets you might have some luck in spoofing (injecting) an ICMP fragmentation needed message back at yourself until you end up with the desired MTU. Rather ugly, but depending on how desperate you are it might be appropriate. You could for example generate these packets with iptables rules, so the ...


2

TCP sends whatever-sized segments it wants to send over the wire; you can't control that from the socket layer. Perhaps the remote machine is only offering a window big enough to send 1314 bytes of data (1314 + 14 bytes of Ethernet header + 20 bytes of IP header without options + 20 bytes of TCP header without options = 1368), or perhaps the congestion ...


2

Your assumption about the causation of a TCP Reset being sent is incorrect. If you've exceeded the MTU, that's not managed by TCP. It's managed at the IP layer and an ICMP "fragmentation required" message will be sent to the client. Such a message should then cause the client to fragment the packets at the IP layer. This is not happening in your case based ...


2

You should use the NetworkInterface class to query and obtain the network interfaces, then call getMTU().


2

Today, looking into the code of netcfg I saw that the configuration of the interfaces is located into /sys/class/net.. and then I thought of you! (I read your question yesterday) If you have root access, open a terminal and run cat /sys/class/net/<interface>/mtu



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible