Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

31

Hierarchical indexing (also referred to as “multi-level” indexing) was introduced in the pandas 0.4 release. This opens the door to some quite sophisticated data analysis and manipulation, especially for working with higher dimensional data. In essence, it enables you to effectively store and manipulate arbitrarily high dimension data in a 2-dimensional ...


17

When sorting by a MultiIndex you need to contain the tuple describing the column inside a list*: In [11]: df.sort([('Group1', 'C')], ascending=False) Out[11]: Group1 Group2 A B C A B C 2 5 6 9 1 0 0 1 1 0 3 2 5 7 3 7 0 2 0 3 5 * so as not to confuse pandas into thinking you want to ...


13

A short explanation on the underlying structure is given here, quoted below: The implementation is based on nodes interlinked with pointers, just as say your favorite std::set implementation. I'll elaborate a bit on this: A std::set is usually implemented as an rb-tree where nodes look like struct node { // header color c; pointer ...


10

#include <iostream> #include "boost/unordered_map.hpp" #include <boost/multi_index_container.hpp> #include <boost/multi_index/member.hpp> #include <boost/multi_index/ordered_index.hpp> #include <boost/multi_index/hashed_index.hpp> #include <boost/multi_index/sequenced_index.hpp> using namespace std; using namespace ...


9

It's actually pretty simple (FWIW, I originally thought to do it your way): df['bar', 'three'] = [0, 1, 2] df = df.sort_index(axis=1) print(df) bar baz one two three one two A -0.212901 0.503615 0 -1.660945 0.446778 B -0.803926 -0.417570 1 -0.336827 0.989343 C 3.400885 ...


7

Sort the frame, then select/set using a tuple for the multi-index In [12]: df = pd.DataFrame(randn(6, 3), index=arrays, columns=['A', 'B', 'C']) In [13]: df Out[13]: A B C bar one 0 -0.694240 0.725163 0.131891 two 1 -0.729186 0.244860 0.530870 baz one 2 0.757816 1.129989 0.893080 qux one 3 -2.275694 0.680023 ...


6

Your call to insert returns a std::pair< iterator, bool >. The bool will be true only if the insert succeeded. See http://www.boost.org/doc/libs/1_43_0/libs/multi_index/doc/reference/ord_indices.html#modifiers


6

Rather than providing a user-defined comparator, you can write a user-defined key extractor: struct FooBarPropertyExtractor { typedef std::string result_type; const result_type& oeprator()(const Foo& f) { return f.bar().property(); } }; ... typedef boost::multi_index_container< Bar, boost::multi_index::indexed_by< ...


6

Well, the documentation for member function indexers says they call the referenced member function: http://www.boost.org/doc/libs/1_46_0/libs/multi_index/doc/reference/key_extraction.html#key_extractors But when in doubt, profile: #include <boost/multi_index_container.hpp> #include <boost/multi_index/mem_fun.hpp> #include ...


6

Every index supports generation of an iterator by value using iterator_to. If you already have an iterator to the target value in one index, you could use this to convert to an iterator in another index. iterator iterator_to(const value_type& x); const_iterator iterator_to(const value_type& x)const; For conversion to index you can likely ...


6

Since you're not aggregating similarly indexed rows, try setting the index with a list of column names. In [2]: df.set_index(['Name', 'Destination']) Out[2]: Length Name Destination Bob Athens 3 Rome 5 Athens 2 Alice Rome 1 Athens 3 Rome ...


6

To query the df by the MultiIndex values, for example where (A > 1.7) and (B < 666): In [536]: result_df = df.loc[(df.index.get_level_values('A') > 1.7) & (df.index.get_level_values('B') < 666)] In [537]: result_df Out[537]: C A B 3.3 222 43 333 59 5.5 333 56 Hence, to get for example the 'A' index values, if still ...


5

Yes: #include <boost/multi_index_container.hpp> #include <boost/multi_index/ordered_index.hpp> #include <boost/multi_index/hashed_index.hpp> #include <boost/multi_index/sequenced_index.hpp> #include <boost/multi_index/random_access_index.hpp> #include <boost/mpl/bool.hpp> #include <boost/mpl/or.hpp> #include ...


5

You could achieve this by using boost::multi_index with two indices: ordered_non_unique(which allows values with the same key) and random_access(which will keep the insertion order). struct some { long key; int data; int more_data; // etc. }; typedef multi_index_container< some, indexed_by< random_access<>, // keep ...


5

Just yesterday, the illustrious Andy Hayden added this feature to version 0.13 of pandas, which will be released any day now. See here for usage example he added to the docs. If you are comfortable installing the development version of pandas from source, you can use it now. df['Measurements'] = df.reset_index().groupby('Trial').cumcount() The following ...


5

try pandas.DataFrame.update DataFrame.update(other, join='left', overwrite=True, filter_func=None, raise_conflict=False) Modify DataFrame in place using non-NA values from passed DataFrame. Aligns on indices


5

You can do it with concat (the keys argument will create the hierarchical columns index): dict = {'ABC' : df1, 'XYZ' : df2} print pd.concat(dict.values(),axis=1,keys=dict.keys()) XYZ ABC \ Open High Low Close Volume Open High Date ...


4

Conceptually, yes. From what I understand of Boost.MultiIndex (I've used it, but not seen the implementation), your example with two ordered_unique indices will indeed create two sorted associative containers (like std::map) which store pointers/references/indices into a common set of employees. In any case, every employee is stored only once in the ...


4

iterator_to is a relatively new function in Boost (it's there since 1.35). It adds a little of the syntax sugar when using with default index. For older versions of Boost the function project is the only choise. You can use project as follows: ArticleSet x; // consider we've found something using `by_db_id` index ...


4

I believe you need to create a predicate object that takes two instances of Foo and its operator() can call Foo::bar() on both instances. Something like struct MyPredicate { bool operator() (const Foo& obj1, const Foo& obj2) const { // fill in here } }; and then use ... ...


4

Use relocate: http://www.boost.org/libs/multi_index/doc/reference/rnd_indices.html#rearrange_operations


4

A hack would be to change the order of the levels: In [11]: g Out[11]: Sales Manufacturer Product Name Product Launch Date Apple iPad 2010-04-03 30 iPod 2001-10-23 34 Samsung Galaxy 2009-04-27 24 Galaxy Tab ...


4

With a 'float' like index you always want to use it as a column rather than a direct indexing action. These will all work whether the endpoints exist or not. In [11]: df Out[11]: C A B 1.1 111 81 222 45 3.3 222 98 333 13 5.5 333 89 6.6 777 98 In [12]: x = df.reset_index() Q1 In [13]: ...


4

You can unstack the result: In [11]: data.xs(key='A', level='Location').unstack(0) Out[11]: val1 gas no2 o3 so2 Date 2013-01-01 00:00:00 0 NaN NaN 2013-01-01 00:00:05 NaN 1 NaN 2013-01-01 00:00:10 NaN NaN 2 [3 rows x 3 columns]


4

This is a bug in the Boost 1.55 version of Boost.MultiIndex that has been fixed in the upcoming Boost 1.56. You can see a fuller description of the problem (along with a patch you can download and apply locally until Boost 1.56 is out) at https://svn.boost.org/trac/boost/ticket/9587


4

If you know you always want to aggregate over the first two levels, then this is pretty easy: In [27]: data.groupby(level=[0, 1]).sum() Out[27]: A B 277 b 37 a B 159 b 16 dtype: int64


3

std::set_intersection( L1_ID_index.begin(),L1_ID_index.end(), L2_ID_index.begin(),L2_ID_index.end(), output_iterator, L1_ID_index.value_comp());


3

You could also (as a workaround since there isn't really an API that does exactly what you want ) consider a bit of reshaping-fu if you don't want to use a Panel. I wouldn't recommend it on enormous data sets, though: use a Panel for that. In [30]: df = dftst.stack(0) In [31]: df['close_avg'] = pd.rolling_mean(df.close.unstack(), 5).stack() In [32]: df ...


3

A simpler way: add the following member functions to your StringPointerLesscomparison predicate: struct StringPointerLess{ ... bool operator()(boost::shared_ptr<QString> const& x,const QString& y)const{ return *x<y; } bool operator()(const QString& x,boost::shared_ptr<QString> const& y)const{ return x<*y; ...


3

Your question wasn't clear about exactly which dates you were missing; I'm just assuming that you want to fill NaN for any date for which you do have an observation elsewhere. My solution will have to be amended if this assumption is faulty. Side note: it may be nice to include a line to create the DataFrame In [55]: df = pd.DataFrame({'A': ['loc_a'] * ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible