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1

Apparently: sample.groupby(axis=1, level=0).apply(lambda z: z.div(z.sum(axis=1), axis=0)) works as intended returning: syn mis non syn mis non syn mis non syn mis non A A A C C C T T T G G G A 0.24 0.38 0.38 0.36 0.14 0.50 0.19 0.31 0.50 0.50 0.17 ...


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This was a bug fixed in 0.16.1, see here: https://github.com/pydata/pandas/issues/9697


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Series (and dictionaries) can be used just like functions with map and apply: df['A'] = pd.Series(idx0).map(s).values In [105]: df Out[105]: A B bar one True NaN two True NaN three True NaN baz one False NaN foo one True NaN two True NaN FWIW, could also do it like this: df['A'] = ...


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You can use data.index.get_level_values() to filter multiIndex >> data.iloc[data.index.get_level_values('k1') == 'one'] to filter the index based on k1 alone. To filter based on k1 and k2 use can use >> data.iloc[(data.index.get_level_values('k1') == 'one') & (data.index.get_level_values('k2') == 1)]


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If you are not concerned about conserving the index (I often prefer an arbitrary integer index) you can just use the following one-liner: grouped.reset_index().sort(["Manufacturer","Product Launch Date"])


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Just groupby by level=0 or 'Greek' if you prefer and then you can call diff on values: In [179]: df.groupby(level=0)['values'].diff() Out[179]: Greek English alpha a NaN b 2 c 2 d 2 beta e NaN f 1 g 1 h 1 dtype: float64


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This method is a little messy, but I am trying to make it more robust to account for missing data. First, we'll remove duplicates in the data and then convert the dates to Pandas Timestamps: df = df.drop_duplicates() df.SampleDate = [pd.Timestamp(ts) for ts in df.SampleDate] Then let's arrange you DataFrame so that it is indexed on a unique set of dates ...



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