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164

In the 2009-2011 period, the following things have happened: 2012: From 2012, the parallel Haskell status updates began appearing in the Parallel Haskell Digest. 2011: Parallel and Concurrent Programming in Haskell, a tutorial. version 1.1 released by Simon Marlow Haskell and parallelism, mentioned in an article in the Economist magazine, Jun 2nd ...


120

You can do this with make - with gnu make it is the -j flag (this will also help on a uniprocessor machine). For example if you want 4 parallel jobs from make: make -j 4 You can also run gcc in a pipe with gcc -pipe This will pipeline the compile stages, which will also help keep the cores busy. If you have additional machines available too, you ...


78

Sparks are not threads. forkIO introduces Haskell threads (which map down onto fewer real OS threads). Sparks create entries in the work queues for each thread, from which they'll take tasks to execute if the thread becomes idle. As a result sparks are very cheap (you might have billions of them in a program, while you probably won't have more than a ...


75

You can try using a "catchpoint" (catch throw) to stop the debugger at the point where the exception is generated. The following excerpt From the gdb manual describes the catchpoint feature. 5.1.3 Setting catchpoints You can use catchpoints to cause the debugger to stop for certain kinds of program events, such as C++ exceptions or the loading of a ...


74

There is no such thing as "multiprocessor" or "multicore" programming. The distinction between "multiprocessor" and "multicore" computers is probably not relevant to you as an application programmer; it has to do with subtleties of how the cores share access to memory. In order to take advantage of a multicore (or multiprocessor) computer, you need a ...


73

Two new keywords added to the C# 5.0 language are async and await, both of which work hand in hand to run a C# method asynchronously without blocking the calling thread. That gets across the purpose of the feature, but it gives too much "credit" to the async/await feature. Let me be very, very clear on this point: await does not magically cause a ...


64

This isn't a direct answer to the question, but it's an answer to a question that appears in the comments. Essentially, the question is what support the hardware gives to multi-threaded operation. Nicholas Flynt had it right, at least regarding x86. In a multi threaded environment (Hyper-threading, multi-core or multi-processor), the Bootstrap thread ...


59

GHC's runtime provides an execution environment supporting billions of sparks, thousands of lightweight threads, which may be distributed over multiple hardware cores. Compile with -threaded and use the +RTS -N4 flags to set your desired number of cores. Specifically: does this mean that creating a lot of them (like 1000) will not have a drastic ...


59

I would give Erlang a try. Even though it will be a steeper learning curve, you will get more out of it since you will be learning a functional programming language. Also, since Erlang is specifically designed to create reliable, highly concurrent systems, you will learn plenty about creating highly scalable services at the same time.


57

Inherently sequential. Example: The number of women will not reduce the length of pregnancy.


53

I've used MPI extensively on large clusters with multi-core nodes. I'm not sure if it's the right thing for a single multi-core box, but if you anticipate that your code may one day scale larger than a single chip, you might consider implementing it in MPI. Right now, nothing scales larger than MPI. I'm not sure where the posters who mention unacceptable ...


53

Multi-CPU was the first version: You'd have one or more mainboards with one or more CPU chips on them. The main problem here was that the CPUs would have to expose some of their internal data to the other CPU so they wouldn't get in their way. The next step was hyper-threading. One chip on the mainboard but it had some parts twice internally so it could ...


49

Eric Lippert has an excellent answer; I just wanted to describe async parallelism a bit further. The simple "serial" approach is where you await just one thing at a time: static void Process() { Thread.Sleep(100); // Do CPU work. } static async Task Test() { await Task.Run(Process); await Task.Run(Process); } In this example, the Test method will ...


46

I'm the one who was working on this Summer of Code project. The patches have been sent to Duncan, but he hasn't reviewed them yet. Note that my code works at the package granularity, so you won't get any speedup when building a single package. I'm currently working on a parallel wrapper around ghc --make, which will solve this problem (I hope to get it ...


46

You can still do this in top Type 1 - it shows each cpu Limit the processes shown by having that specific process run under a specific user account and use Type 'u' to limit to that user


41

What is the state of Haskell multi-threading? Mature. The implementation is around 15 years old, with transactional memory for 5 years. GHC is a widely used compiler, with large open source support, and commercial backing. How easy is it to introduce into programs? This depends on the algorithm. Sometimes it can be a one line use of par to gain ...


41

There are two basic ways to multi-thread in Java. Each logical task you create with these methods should run on a fresh core when needed and available. Method one: define a Runnable or Thread object (which can take a Runnable in the constructor) and start it running with the Thread.start() method. It will execute on whatever core the OS gives it -- ...


39

I can't speak for Erlang, but a few things that haven't been mentioned about node: Node uses Google's V8 engine to actually compile javascript into machine code. So node is actually pretty fast. So that's on top of the speed benefits offered by event-driven programming and non-blocking io. Node has a pretty active community. Hop onto their IRC group on ...


38

I'd generalize that writing a highly optimized multi-threaded process is a lot harder than just throwing some threads in the mix. I recommend starting with the following steps: Split up your workloads into discrete parallel executable units Measure and characterize workload types - Network intensive, I/O intensive, CPU intensive etc - these become the ...


37

Stackless python does not make use of any kind of multi-core environment it runs on. This is a common misconception about Stackless, as it allows the programmer to take advantage of thread-based programming. For many people these two are closely intertwined, but are, in fact two separate things. Internally Stackless uses a round-robin scheduler to schedule ...


36

Short answer is: You cannot. Long answer is: If you are asking this question, you do not probably know enough to be able to create a lock free structure. Creating lock free structures is extremely hard, and only experts in this field can do it. Instead of writing your own, search for an existing implementation. When you find it, check how widely it is ...


35

Does Java have support for multicore processors/parallel processing? Yes. It also has been a platform for other programming languages where the implementation added a "true multithreading" or "real threading" selling point. The G1 Garbage Collector introduced in newer releases also makes use of multi-core hardware. Java Concurrency in Practice Try ...


35

You can use: mpstat -P ALL 1 It shows how much each core is busy and it updates automatically each second. The output would be something like this (on a quad-core processor): 10:54:41 PM CPU %usr %nice %sys %iowait %irq %soft %steal %guest %idle 10:54:42 PM all 8.20 0.12 0.75 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 90.93 ...


33

My research work includes work on compilers and on spam filtering. I also do a lot of 'personal productivity' Unix stuff. Plus I write and use software to administer classes that I teach, which includes grading, testing student code, tracking grades, and myriad other trivia. Multicore affects me not at all except as a research problem for compilers to ...


32

I haven't used TBB extensively, but my impression is that they complement each other more than competing. TBB provides threadsafe containers and some parallel algorithms, whereas OpenMP is more of a way to parallelise existing code. Personally I've found OpenMP very easy to drop into existing code where you have a parallelisable loop or bunch of sections ...


32

LLVM is several things together - kind of a virtual machine/optimizing compiler, combined with different frontends that take the input in a particular language and output the result in an intermediate language. This intermediate output can be run with the virtual machine, or can be used to generate a standalone executable. The problem with concurrency is ...


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R can only make use of multiple cores with the help of add-on packages, and only for some types of operation. The options are discussed in detail on the High Performance Computing Task View on CRAN Update: From R Version 2.14.0 add-on packages are not necessarily required due to the inclusion of the parallel package as a recommended package shipped with R. ...


30

I agree with all previous answers, but I think a key point that is not made totally clear is that one reason that MPI might be considered hard and Erlang easy is the match of model to the domain. Erlang is based on a concept of local memory, asynchronous message passing, and shared state solved by using some form of global database that all threads can get ...


29

See A Gentle Introduction to Glasgow Parallel Haskell. Parallelism is introduced in GPH by the par combinator, which takes two arguments that are to be evaluated in parallel. The expression p `par` e (here we use Haskell's infix operator notation) has the same value as e, and is not strict in its first argument, i.e. bottom `par` e has the value of e. ...


28

As I understand it, each "core" is a complete processor, with its own register set. Basically, the BIOS starts you off with one core running, and then the operating system can "start" other cores by initializing them and pointing them at the code to run, etc. Synchronization is done by the OS. Generally, each processor is running a different process for ...



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