Tag Info

New answers tagged

0

It sounds like you want to use parallel computing to make a single call of the lqmm function execute more quickly. To do that, you either have to: Split the one call of lqmm into multiple function calls; Parallelize a loop inside lqmm. Some functions can be split up into multiple smaller pieces by specifying a smaller iteration value. Examples include ...


0

The dependent libraries will need to be evaluated on all your nodes. The function clusterEvalQ is foreseen inside the parallel package for this purpose. You might also need to export some of your data to the global environments of your subnodes: For this you can use the clusterExport function. Also view this page for more info on other relevant functions ...


4

The method Thread.currentThread() returns the thread which we are currently running inside. It is simply a way of saying: "Hey give me a reference of the thread that is running me" Suppose we have four cores and four threads A,B,C and D are running absolutely concurrently, calling this method at the same time, it will return A, B, C and D appropriately ...


3

The documentation is very poor in this case. What Thread.currentThread() returns is actually the thread where you execute that line of code in. So whether you are in a multi-processor environment or not doesn't matter in this case. When you have two threads ThreadA and ThreadB running completely in parallel and you ask for Thread.currentThread() in parallel ...


3

These methods are static because you can access to the current execution thread of your core/CPU that is executing that code. If there is more than one core or CPU processors, each core that passes through this code will return to you its own thread. So you don't need to care about how many cores/CPUs are in the system, these methods will work in both ...


1

it works only for the "current" thread. In a multicore system if your code is single threaded only one thread is running and this is the current one so this code will work on that one. If you have multithreading program this code will work in the thread it is called. The number of cores doesn't really matter. Java distributes the threads and the load to the ...


1

The problem is that randomForestSRC uses the mclapply function for parallel execution, but mclapply doesn't support parallel execution on Windows. randomForestSRC can also use OpenMP for multithreaded parallel execution, but that isn't built into the binary distribution from CRAN, so you have to build the package from source with OpenMP support enabled. I ...


0

You can use those lightweight MapReduce frameworks for multicore computers. For example LeoTask: A lightweight, productive, and reliable mapreduce framework for multicore computers https://github.com/mleoking/LeoTask


2

Yes, it can, as this is its stated purpose — to split and parallelize what is parallelizeable. You can even specify amount of memory to be used by each executor. However, some tasks cannot be parallelized, which is why sometimes Spark only occupies one core. If you use the Spark shell, make sure you set the number of cores to use, as it is said in the ...


0

No, a single thread can only run on a single core. You'll have to use multiple threads or processes to use more than one core at the same time. Remember that not all tasks can run asynchron in multiple threads.


0

grayval**=*(0xff000000)*|**(lum<<16)|(lum<<8)|lum; You need to apply a mask before you move the bits.


0

It is not related to the threading mechanism. The problem is that (for example in python) you have to get interpreter instance to run the script. To acquire the interpreter you have to lock it as it is going to keep the reference count and etc and need to avoid concurrent access to this objects. Python uses pthread and they are real threads but when you are ...



Top 50 recent answers are included