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157

You found a code generation bug in the .NET 4 x86 jitter. It is a very unusual one, it only fails when the code is not optimized. The machine code looks like this: State a = s[0, 0]; 013F04A9 push 0 ; index 2 = 0 013F04AB mov ecx,dword ptr [ebp-40h] ; s[] reference 013F04AE xor edx,edx ...


78

The variable e is a pointer to an array of n + 1 elements of type double. Using the dereference operator on e gives you the base-type of e which is " array of n + 1 elements of type double". The malloc call simply takes the base-type of e (explained above) and gets its size, multiplies it by n + 1, and passing that size to the malloc function. Essentially ...


53

This is the typical way you should allocate 2D arrays dynamically. e is an array pointer to an array of type double [n+1]. sizeof(*e) therefore gives the type of the pointed-at type, which is the size of one double [n+1] array. You allocate room for n+1 such arrays. You set the array pointer e to point at the first array in this array of arrays. This ...


36

This idiom falls naturally out of 1D array allocation. Let's start with allocating a 1D array of some arbitrary type T: T *p = malloc( sizeof *p * N ); Simple, right? The expression *p has type T, so sizeof *p gives the same result as sizeof (T), so we're allocating enough space for an N-element array of T. This is true for any type T. Now, let's ...


10

Yes, it can be obtained by induction. (Just to add, as a suggestion, if that helps, try to think of multi-dimensional arrays as array of arrays.) For example, consider an array like a[3][3]. So, a[0][0], a[0][1] and a[0][2] are elements of a[0] and they will be contiguous. Next, a[0] and a[1] are elements of a, so it will be contiguous an so on. Taken ...


8

You need to create an array reference, and push that as the next element. The easiest way is to make an anonymous array ref. push @arraytest, [10, 11, 12]; Your output now looks like this: Array - 1 2 3 Array - 4 5 6 Array - 7 8 9 Array - 10 11 12 The important part is that your @arraytest is an actual array (not a reference), so you can just operate ...


8

Let's consider OP's declaration: enum State : sbyte { OK = 0, BUG = -1 } Since the bug only occurs when BUG is negative (from -128 to -1) and State is an enum of signed byte I started to suppose that there were a cast issue somewhere. If you run this: Console.WriteLine((sbyte)s[0, 0]); Console.WriteLine((sbyte)State.BUG); Console.WriteLine(s[0, 0]); ...


7

How about something like this? function gen_path($tree, $parent=null) { $paths = array(); //add trailing slash to parent if it is not null if($parent !== null) { $parent = $parent.'/'; } //loop through the tree array foreach($tree as $k => $v) { if(is_array($v)) { $currentPath = $parent.$k; ...


6

help("[") tells us this: Matrices and arrays [...] A third form of indexing is via a numeric matrix with the one column for each dimension: each row of the index matrix then selects a single element of the array, and the result is a vector. Thus, we transform your y matrix to a shape that conforms with this. library(reshape2) z <- ...


6

Actually you are defining an array of arrays of integers. It can decay to a pointer to an array of integers, but it will not decay into a pointe to a pointer of integers. It will help if you draw the memory layout: +---------+---------+---------+---------+ | a[0][0] | a[0][1] | a[1][0] | a[1][1] | +---------+---------+---------+---------+ | 1 | 2 ...


6

OK, the thing you need to know is - that an array of arrays in perl, is implemented as an array of array references. So - $array[$i] - is a reference to an array. So you can simply: @{$array[$i]} = sort @{$array[$i]}; Although note by default, sort does alphanumeric, rather than just numeric. So you might want: @{$array[$i]} = sort { $a <=> ...


6

You can reshape A from 3D to 2D, use the very efficient matrix-multiplication, which will give you a 1D array and finally reshape back to 2D for the final output, like so - res = reshape(reshape(A,[],size(A,3))*c(:),size(A,1),[])


6

arr.filter(function(v) { return !v.includes(4); });


6

You need to use day.Length not Length.day. day is your variable -- an array -- and it has a Length property.


6

One simple recursive answer is this (in ES2015): const mCreate = (...sizes) => Array.from({ length: sizes[0] }, () => sizes.length === 1 ? 0 : mCreate(...sizes.slice(1))); JS Bin here EDIT: I think I'd add the initializer in with a higher order function though: const mCreate = (...sizes) => (initialValue) => Array.from({ ...


5

You could just use vector: std::vector<std::vector<int>> abc(rows, std::vector<int>(cols, 1)); You cannot use std::fill_n or memset on abc directly, it simply will not work. You can only use either on the sub-arrays: int **abc = new int*[rows]; for (uint32_t i = 0; i < rows; i++) { abc[i] = new int[cols]; std::fill_n(abc[i], ...


5

use array_sum and array_map function together. try below solution: $array = Array ( '0' => Array ( 'num1' => 123, 'num2' => 456, ), '1' => Array ( 'num3' => 789, 'num4' => 147, ), '2' => Array ( 'num5' => 258, 'num6' => 369, 'num7' => 987, ...


5

Yes they are contiguous. I would say the fact "an array" (i.e. singular) is contiguous infers that a multi-dimensional one is. Each array within it must be contiguous and the outer array must be a contiguous collection of those arrays...


5

According to 6.2.5 Types p20: An array type describes a contiguously allocated nonempty set of objects with a particular member object type, called the element type. The element type shall be complete whenever the array type is specified. ... Therefore all array types, multidimensional or not, are contiguously allocated.


4

You can try this- [["aniket", 6], ["shivam", 7], ["tiwari", 8], ["abhijeet", 9]].select {|arr| arr[0].capitalize!}


4

You need to iterate through the outer and inner array, constructing another one with the words capitalized: output.map{|e| [e[0].capitalize, e[1]]} output is your array.


4

To change the array in-place I'd use each: arr = [["aniket", 6], ["shivam", 7], ["tiwari", 8], ["abhijeet", 9]] arr.each { |word, _| word.capitalize! } arr #=> [["Aniket", 6], ["Shivam", 7], ["Tiwari", 8], ["Abhijeet", 9]] _ is a placeholder for an unused variable (because the 2nd element is not used in the block). Note that capitalize! will change ...


4

In String [][] obj2 = new String [10][]; you are initializing obj2 to refer to an array of 10 String[] elements. The elements of the array are initialized to null, which is why obj2[1].length throws a NullPointerException. This type of declaration allows you to assign arrays of different lengths in the 2D array. For example : obj2[0] = new String[5]; ...


4

I'm looking at this as an opportunity for some code golf. It's definitely possible to do this as a one-liner: > `dim<-`(x[cbind(c(row(y)), c(col(y)), c(y))], dim(y)) [,1] [,2] [,3] [,4] [1,] 1 4 19 34 [2,] 2 17 20 35 [3,] 3 18 33 36 As @Roland's answer shows, matrix/array indexing involves creating an n-column matrix ...


4

You can already access every letter. A string is series of characters (Php Doc) This work's fine. print_r($table[0][0]); // return r


4

You could write a mapmap : ('a -> 'b) -> 'a list list -> 'b list list that works like the regular map : ('a -> 'b) -> 'a list -> 'b list by using map twice: (* Apply 'List.map f' to each xs in xss *) let mapmap f xss = List.map (fun xs -> List.map f xs) xss (* Written a bit shorter *) let mapmap f = List.map (List.map f) Then writing ...


4

Yes, this is a perfect job for bsxfun and permute: res = sum(bsxfun(@times,A,permute(c,[3,1,2])),3) You send c to the third dimension using permute(c,[3,1,2]). Then, by calling bsxfun, each of the matrices in A is multiplied by the corresponding (permuted) c. Finally, you can do a sum over the third dimension.


4

One can extend this solution to Efficient Implementation of im2col and col2im again with bsxfun for a 3D array case to solve your case. Now, there are two possible interpretations to the question : Extract blocks of size p x p and as vectors each, do this for entire first 2D slice and then repeat this for all slices in 3D, resulting in a 3D output. Gather ...


4

I think you just need to judiciously insert new axes and let broadcasting handle the rest: >>> a1 = np.ones((2,), dtype=bool) >>> a2 = np.ones((4,), dtype=bool) >>> a3 = np.ones((3,), dtype=bool) >>> >>> a1[1]= False >>> a2[1:3] = False >>> a3[1:] = False >>> >>> a1[:, None, ...


4

I'm going to assume you're using NumPy since Python itself doesn't have multidimensional arrays. The easy way to do this is using a "flat" view of the array: myarray.flat[-1] = 1



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