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7

Using time.sleep() prevents twisted from doing its job. To make it work you can't use time.sleep(), you must return control to twisted instead. The easiest way to modify your existing code to do that is by using twisted.internet.defer.inlineCallbacks, which is the next best thing since sliced bread: #!/usr/bin/env python import time from twisted.web ...


4

A lot of this depends on what you want to do with the data. I assume render it. Flash probably would be the simplest solution. It's a common enough add-on that just about everyone should have it by now; so you're not running much of a risk for incompatibility. JavaScript just hasn't been considered much of a good platform for binary data handling -- so, ...


2

As for data streaming and socket style connections you might want to take a look at the APE (Ajax Push Engine) project. It allows you to set up a HTTP proxy that your JavaScript can connect through for true socket connections. As for what to do with the data when it arrives, I've done a proof of concept showing how you can work with raw PNG data, parse it ...


2

I've had to do this exact thing before with Video (i.e. motion jpeg) data. I note that you've just said "binary data"... is this image data or not? what is it? multipart/x-mixed-replace works fine in alot of browsers these days. I think it might even be supported in the later versions of IE. It certainly works in all versions of firefox from around 5 ...


1

jQuery almost certainly sets its own internal readystatechange handler on the XHR it creates, and you're overwriting it. Use xhr.addEventListener('readystatechange', function() { ... instead.


1

The page you link to also answers your question. It is supported in FireFox, Chrome and Safari, but not in IE or in Safari on the iPhone. The page doesn't say anything about IE 10, but since it isn't officially released yet, that makes sense. According to MSDN, though, IE 10 does seem to support Comet streaming. Apart from IE, it has been around for years ...


1

Have you seen this? http://www.servlets.com/cos/javadoc/com/oreilly/servlet/MultipartResponse.html It looks like the example sends each part individually and waits a specified time limit before sending the next or receiving an interrupt.


1

How about storing the response length after each part, and using that as the offset: var offset = 0; var r = new XMLHttpRequest(); r.multipart = true; r.open('GET', '/', true); r.onreadystatechange = function () { var latestPart = r.responseText.substring(offset) offset = r.responseText.length; }; r.send();


1

You can try the following approach... At the server side... Create a wrapper object that can encapsulate all types. For eg., it could have a Map for TEXT and another Map for Binary data. Convert the TEXT content to bytes (octet stream). Create a MetaData which contains references to the Key names and their type. Eg., STR_MYKEY1, BYTES_MYKEY2. This ...


1

Some gotchas: If sending over http it is not be a good idea. The browser may consider the request as timeout if it is not finished within specified amount of time. Server too will close connection which is idle for too long. If client cannot keep up, the timeout is almost certain. setInterval for 10ms is also subject to some restrictions. It doesn't mean ...


1

You can use Base64 to convert the binary to text and send that to the browser. With IE you can convert it directly to binary, but I'm not sure if you can do it with Firefox and others. I did see jscripts for Base64 enflate/deflate and a script named base64.js which probably does the conversion as well. However, you are probably better off converting the ...


1

I would generally avoid using multipart/x-mixed-replace, as it has pretty sketchy browser support. I know that my cameras' multipart/x-mixed-replace doesn't work on IE or newer versions of Firefox (although apparently there is a configuration thing to change that). I think that a small Flash app may be one of your best options.


1

The reason seems to be explained in the FAQ for twisted. The twisted server does not actually write anything to the underlining connection until the reactor thread is free to run, in this case at the end of your method. However you can use reactor.doSelect(timeout) before each of your sleeps to make the reactor write what it has to the connection.



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