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81

Quick and easy with no external tools, works well as long as the two sheets you are comparing are similar: Create a third spreadsheet Type =if(Sheet1!A1 <> Sheet2!A1, "X", "") in the top left cell (or equivalent: click on the actual cells to automatically have the references inserted into the formula) Ctrl+C (copy), Ctrl+A (select all), Ctrl+V ...


72

Scanner reader = new Scanner(System.in); System.out.println("Enter the first number"); //get user input for a a=reader.nextInt(); Assuming only integer values will be entered


55

If previous command failed with ; the second one will run. But with && the second one will not run. This is a "lazy" logical "AND" operand between operations.


55

We faced the exact same issue in our co. Our tests output excel workbooks. Binary diff was not an option. So we rolled out our own simple command line tool. Check out the ExcelCompare project. Infact this allows us to automate our tests quite nicely. Patches / Feature requests quite welcome!


39

You can use any of the following based on the requirement: Scanner class BufferedReader and InputStreamReader classes DataInputStream class Console class using Scanner class Scanner scan = new Scanner(System.in); String s = scan.next(); int i = scan.nextInt(); using BufferedReader class BufferedReader br = new BufferedReader( new ...


28

Question 1: Default constructors do initialize POD members to 0 according to the C++ standard. See the quoted text below. Question 2: If a constructor must be specified in a base class, then that class cannot be part of a union. Finally, you can provide a constructor for your union: union U { A a; B b; U() { memset( this, 0, sizeof( U ) ); } }; ...


25

From Wikipedia: .NET Framework 1.1: Windows Server 2003 .NET Framework 2.0: Windows Server 2003 R2 .NET Framework 3.0: Windows Vista, Windows Server 2008 .NET Framework 3.5: Windows 7, Windows Server 2008 R2 .NET Framework 4.0: n/a .NET Framework 4.5: Windows 8, Windows Server 2012 .NET Compact Framework 1.0 (SP2): Windows Mobile 5.0 .NET Compact Framework ...


22

You can use the Scanner class or the Console class Console console = System.console(); String input = console.readLine("Enter input:");


20

If you don't want to shell out for the Diff Doc program and your spreadsheets are not very complicated, you could export them both as CSV and use a tool like Beyond Compare


16

Use Qt and the BOOST C++ Libraries. They are both free and very high quality. Also, at least for me personally, I found Qt to be much more straightforward, easy to learn, and simpler than wxWidgets.


14

"On Linux I can easily provide a ./game script to run the file for end users:" Correct. "but that's not very cross-platform." Half-correct. There are exactly two shell languages that matter. Standard Linux "sh" and Non-standard Windows "bat" (a/k/a cmd.exe) and that's all there is nowadays. [When I was a kid, there was Open VMS DCL and Data General's ...


14

First things first. Asking if a design (or in fact anything) is "good" depends on how you define "goodness". Typical criteria are performance, maintainability, scalability, testability, reusability etc. It would help if you could add some of that context. Having said that... Is this good use of API It's usually a good idea to separate out your business ...


14

Because you are doing an equality comparison on floating-point types, which in general should not be relied upon for particular bit-exact behaviour from machine to machine (or from compiler to compiler, etc.). Possible reasons include the compiler's choice of when to move floating-point results out of wide (80-bit) floating-point registers (neither the ...


12

This is only a guess, you would need to look at the assembly output from the compiler to know for sure. It is possible that one compiler left intermediate results in a floating-point register while the other wrote the results to memory, rounding it from 80 bits to 64. It's also possible that one uses SSE and the other does not.


12

You can use either C or C++ for the implementation, but I would recommend to define the interface in pure C. It will be much easier to integrate.


12

I've done a lot of comparing of Excel workbooks in the past. My technique works very well for workbooks with many worksheets, but it only compares cell contents, not cell formatting, macros, etc. Also, there's some coding involved but it's well worth it if you have to compare a lot of large files repeatedly. Here's how it works: A) Write a simple dump ...


11

if(.Platform$OS.type == "unix") { } else { }


10

Hudson is my recommendation. It's easy to setup and use, it's free, there are a large amount of third-party plugins and good community support.


9

with preprocessor: #ifdef _SUNOS //code #elseif _LINUX //code #elseif _HPUX //code #elseif _WIN32 //code #else #error OS not supported #endif


8

NO! There is no guarantee what order these are carried out in. Only that both g() and h() are carried out before f(). See this: http://www.gotw.ca/gotw/056.htm I think there's an updated C++11 version of that, I'll have a look. Edit: C++11 version http://herbsutter.com/gotw/_102/ Edit 2: If you really want to know what specific compilers do, try this: ...


8

You can get User Input using BufferedReader . BufferedReader br = new BufferedReader(new InputStreamReader(System.in)); String ac_no; System.out.println("Enter your Account number: "); ac_no = br.readLine(); It will stored String value in ac_no so you have to parse it in Integer using Integer.parseInt(ac_no)


8

Boost.Filesystem


8

Use a version control system that's smart enough to ignore line-endings on check-in, and use the correct value for the platform on check-out.


8

Xavier's answer led me in the proper direction, and also informed my Google searching. I was not fully aware of the file declarations, and when searching along those lines, I found Joshua Flanagan's post Tips for building NuGet packages, which is excellent. Xavier and Joshua together taught me a few things: You don't have to assemble a ...


7

Haven't tried it, but possibly you'll need to edit the project file and hack the Conditions into the ItemGroup with the references. Here you go, found an SO question here with the answer.


7

Here is an OperatingSystem Detector: public class OSDetector { private static boolean isWindows = false; private static boolean isLinux = false; private static boolean isMac = false; static { String os = System.getProperty("os.name").toLowerCase(); isWindows = os.contains("win"); isLinux = os.contains("nux") || ...


7

I would use the preprocessor directives and a cross-platform build system such as CMake. You could do: #ifdef LINUX #include <unistd.h> #elif defined(WINDOWS) #include <algorithm.h> # elif Defined(MAC_OSX) //... etc. #else #error No operating system defined #endif Then add the corresponding preprocessor flag to the build, such as: -DLINUX.


7

Sys.info()["sysname"]


7

I would strongly recommend using UTF-8 internally in your application, using regular old char* or std::string for data storage. For interfacing with APIs that use a different encoding (ASCII, UTF-16, etc.), I'd recommend using libiconv, which is licensed under the LGPL. Example usage: class TempWstring { public: TempWstring(const char *str) { ...


7

I'm a huge fan of Lua: Syntax is vaguely Pascal-like and works well in scripts. Superb power-to-weight ratio. Superb engineering. Very good design. Extremely portable to any platform with an ANSI C compiler. GUI support through wxLua and other bindings Some support for hiding OS differences in common tasks, e.g., the Lua File System add-on The core ...



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