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74

You separate the values you want to return by commas: def get_name(): # you code return first_name, last_name The commas indicate it's a tuple, so you could wrap your values by parentheses: return (first_name, last_name) Then when you call the function you a) save all values to one variable as a tuple, or b) separate your variable names by commas ...


55

First thing that comes into my mind: read a b c <<<$(echo 1 2 3) ; echo "$a|$b|$c" output is, unsurprisingly 1|2|3


9

Here is also the code to handle the result: def foo (a): x=a y=a*2 return (x,y) (x,y) = foo(50)


8

How can i return a variable type from a method? I don't want to return an object type and then cast it to another type. Well that's basically what you do have to do. Alternatively, if you're using C# 4 you could make the return type dynamic, which will allow the conversion to be implicit: dynamic VariableReturnExampleMethod(int a) { // Body as per ...


4

The function can't know what is going to be done with the return value, so it can't know how many are needed. What you could do is pass nargout as an argument to your function and use that to decide what to return: def f(a, nargout=1): if nargout == 1: return "one value" elif nargout == 2: return "two", "values" else: ...


3

Use dynamic Keyword in place of BlahBlah if you are targeting .Net 4.0 but if lesser one then object is your safest bet because it is the base class for every other class you can think of.


3

There are two cases here. If you are working in a codebase/framework (e.g. Glib) that has a standard string struct used throughout the entire application, then use your third option: struct string function(); If your codebase is not using one standard struct everywhere for strings, I would advise against using a struct. The hassle of converting back and ...


3

Return as a tuple, e.g. def foo (a): x=a y=a*2 return (x,y)


2

Consider using something like Dapper-dot-net (written by Marc Gravell and Sam Saffron at our very own Stack Overflow) to pull things out of the DB. It handles the database to object mapping for you. Furthermore, if you don't want to use a tool, and you're pulling from a Database, and you know the data types of the various columns at compile time (like it ...


2

It sounds like this might be a good case for generics. If you know what data type you're expecting when you call it, you can call that particular generic version of the function.


2

Why do not you use the optimization toolbox of MATLAB? That's a powerful user-friendly optimization tool. I would recommend the following video tutorials from Mathworks website: 1- Mathematical Modeling with Optimization, Part 1 2- Mathematical Modeling with Optimization, Part 2


2

You don't specify what you want your output to look like. There are several options. Here are two: aggregate(as.character(LAB) ~ ID, data, c, simplify = FALSE) # ID as.character(LAB) # 1 1 A, B, C, A # 2 2 B, C, A, A # 3 3 C, A, A, B # 4 4 A, A, B, C # 5 5 A, B, C, A with(data, tapply(as.character(LAB), ID, FUN = ...


2

I wanted to assign the values to an array. So, extending Michael Krelin's approach, I did read a[{1..3}] <<< $(echo 2 4 6) ; echo "${a[1]}|${a[2]}|${a[3]}" which yields 2|4|6 as expected. (My first post on SO; it should have been a comment, but I don't have that privilege.)


1

This is a simple solution by creating a variable and then assigning values to it using subsets. Is this sufficient to your purpose? list$Z <- NA list$Z[list$G|list$H] <- "a" list$Z[list$I|list$J] <- "b" list$Z[list$K|list$L] <- "c" list EDIT: As per the suggestion by David Arenburg, the code gets cleaner and better readable (and probably more ...


1

This line returns "a" if either x or y is non-zero, and "b" otherwise. ifelse(data$x | data$y, "a", "b") # [1] "a" "a" "a" "b" "b" "b" If you need to handle the case where all four columns are zero, you could use: ifelse(data$x | data$y, "a", ifelse(data$z | data$p, "b", "neither a nor b"))


1

c("b", "a")[(!!rowSums(data[,1:2])) +0 + (!!rowSums(data[,3:4])+1)] #[1] "a" "a" "a" "b" "b" "b" Assuming that I understand the condition and also assuming that there won't be any intersecting cases i.e. rows of either or both x, y that are 1 doesn't have an intersect with z or p having 1 values As a first step, I did rowSums on columns x and y ...


1

Another way: void foo(char **result, int *len); The worst in my opinion is: struct char_and_len foobar(); The one I prefer is the one I showed you, because I don't like to mix return values in both arguments and effective return.


1

Use a string. For the specific example you cite, remember that length is implicitly or explicitly a property of any string type. For example, C-style strings are null-terminated, so even though there's not an explicit length the caller can still determine the length of the string. Pascal-style strings include length as the first byte. char* isn't ...


1

My favourite would be void foobar(struct char_and_len*); For the following reasons: Only a single parameter needs to be passed return value / out parameter aren't mixed return values can be ignored, especially when the return value needs to be deallocated again this can be a serious source of programming errors. Out parameters cannot be ignored. Having ...


1

I think you are looking for split: with(datain, split(LAB, ID)) # $`1` # [1] A B C A # Levels: A B C # # $`2` # [1] B C A A # Levels: A B C # # $`3` # [1] C A A B # Levels: A B C # # $`4` # [1] A A B C # Levels: A B C # # $`5` # [1] A B C A # Levels: A B C Since each ID might have a different number of LABs, the output is a list. Edit: Since it now ...


1

I cannot speak for nargout in MATLAB as I do not know it and I cannot imagine how it should be used correctly. However, you may want to change you view to what a Python function (or method) really does). Actually, Python always returns exactly one value. Or it is None, or it is a single value of some specific type, or it is a single object of the tuple ...


1

I think this might help... In order to break down user inputted dates (mm/dd/yyyy) in my scripts, I store the day, month, and year into an array, and then put the values into separate variables as follows: DATE_ARRAY=(`echo $2 | sed -e 's/\// /g'`) MONTH=(`echo ${DATE_ARRAY[0]}`) DAY=(`echo ${DATE_ARRAY[1]}`) YEAR=(`echo ${DATE_ARRAY[2]}`)


1

Chapter 5 of the Bash Cookbook by O'Reilly, discusses (at some length) the reasons for the requirement in a variable assignment that there be no spaces around the '=' sign MYVAR="something" The explanation has something to do with distinguishing between the name of a command and a variable (where '=' may be a valid argument). This all seems a little like ...



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