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3

You can use the multiprocessing library for this: from multiprocessing import Process, Queue import time q = Queue() def some_func1(arg1, arg2, q): #this one will take longer, so we'll kill it after the other finishes time.sleep(20) q.put('some_func1 finished!') def some_func2(arg1, arg2, q): q.put('some_func2 finished!') proc1 = ...


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The multiprocessing module is designed as a drop-in replacement for the threading module. It's designed to be used for the same kind of tasks you'd normally use threads for; speeding up execution by running against multiple cores, background polling, and any other task that you want running concurrently with some other task. It's not designed to launch ...


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pool.map(function,input) returns a list. You can get the output by doing: output_data = pool.map(function,input) pool.map simply runs the map function in paralell, but it still only returns a single list. If you're not outputting anything in the function you are mapping (and you shouldn't), then it simply returns a list. This is the same as map() ...


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A trick: call os._exit to make parent process exit, in this way daemonic child processes will not be killed. But there are some other side affects, described in the doc: Exit the process with status n, without calling cleanup handlers, flushing stdio buffers, etc. If you do not care about this, you can use it.


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The multiprocessing library isn't particularly well-suited for use with asyncio, unfortunately. Depending on how you were planning to use the multiprocessing/multprocessing.Queue, however, you may be able to replace it completely with a concurrent.futures.ProcessPoolExecutor: import asyncio from concurrent.futures import ProcessPoolExecutor def ...


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There are probably a few issues here. First, you're using too many processes in your pool. Because you're doing a CPU intensive task, you're only going to get diminishing returns if you start more than multiprocessing.cpu_count() workers; if you've got 32 workers doing CPU intensive tasks but only 4 CPUs, 28 processes are always going to be sitting around ...


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The solution is to change your Process initialization: p = Process(target=execfile, args=(m, {})) Honestly, I'm not entirely sure why this works. I know it has something to do with which dictionary (locals vs. globals) that the time import is added to. It seems like when your import is made in foo(), it's treated like a local variable, because the ...


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This actually runs fine for me on Linux, but does hang on Windows. This is because on Windows, everything inside the if __name__ ... guard doesn't get executed in the child process, which of course includes defining unsearched. That means that scan is throwing an exception when it tries to used unsearched, but that exception is never consume in the parent, ...


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Here is an implementation of a multiprocessing.Queue object that can be used with asyncio. It provides the entire multiprocessing.Queue interface, with the addition of coro_get and coro_put methods, which are asyncio.coroutines that can be used to asynchronously get/put from/into the queue. The implementation details are essentially the same as the second ...


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As already noted, you need to make mapAvg a top-level function. Since it currently closes over some "local" variables, you need to fix this as well. You can either pass those currently closed-over variables using an initializer (mapped + initializer in the example) or pass them ain the iterable you're mapping (mapped2) Example, demonstrating (some of) your ...


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The best solution is to restructure your code to not have dynamically declared classes, but assuming that isn't the case, you can do a little more work to pickle them. And this method to your Wrapper class: def __reduce__(self): r = super(Wrapper, self).__reduce__() return (wrapper_unpickler, ((factory, ParentClass, r[0]) + r[1][1:])) ...


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According to the Pickle documentation, the workaround linked in the question could be modified to: class _NestedClassGetter(object): """ From: http://stackoverflow.com/a/11493777/741316 When called with the containing class as the first argument, and the name of the nested class as the second argument, returns an instance of the nested ...


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With bash I imagine you're doing something like this (assuming /home is under network mount): #!/bin/bash for i in {1..$NUM_NODES} do ssh node$i 'python /home/ryan/my_script.py' & done Launching this script from behind a single screen will work fine. Starting up several sessions of screen provides no performance gains but adds in the extra ...


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I would think they are about the same. I would prefer screen just because I have an easier time managing it. Depending on the scripts usage, that could also have some effect on time to process.


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In regards to the log file, yes, having multiple threads right to the same place would interleave within the log file. You could have the thread log the file before the write, which would ensure that something wouldn't get interrupted mid-entry, but it would still interleave things chronologically amongst all the threads. Locking the log file each time also ...


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I think your issue is that the "print" statement is printing what the parent main.py process sees as t.a and t.b, which you have assigned in your calc(x) function, (I don't think you can print in the child worker process but you definitely arent and therefore I don't see how you could see the default values (1,1). You print t.a and t.b BEFORE you assign the ...



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