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248

Here are some pros/cons I came up with. Multiprocessing Pros Separate memory space Code is usually straightforward Takes advantage of multiple CPUs & cores Avoids GIL limitations for cPython Eliminates most needs for synchronization primitives unless if you use shared memory (instead, it's more of a communication model for IPC) Child processes are ...


127

Back in the old days of Python, to call a function with arbitrary arguments, you would use apply: apply(f,args,kwargs) apply still exists in Python2.7 though not in Python3, and is generally not used anymore. Nowadays, f(*args,**kwargs) is preferred. The multiprocessing.Pool modules tries to provide a similar interface. Pool.apply is like Python ...


101

The threading module uses threads, the multiprocessing uses processes. The difference is that threads run in the same memory space, while processes have separate memory. This makes it a bit harder to share objects between processes with multiprocessing. Since threads use the same memory, precautions have to be taken or two threads will write to the same ...


95

A Pipe() can only have two endpoints. A Queue() can have multiple producers and consumers. When to use them If you need more than two points to communicate, use a Queue(). If you need absolute performance, a Pipe() is much faster because Queue() is built on top of Pipe(). Performance Benchmarking Let's assume you want to spawn two processes and send ...


73

is there a variant of pool.map which support multiple arguments? Python 3.3 includes pool.starmap() method: #!/usr/bin/env python3 from functools import partial from itertools import repeat from multiprocessing import Pool, freeze_support def func(a, b): return a + b def main(): a_args = [1,2,3] second_arg = 1 with Pool() as pool: ...


70

Threading's job is to enable applications to be responsive. Suppose you have a database connection and you need to respond to user input. Without threading, if the database connection is busy the application will not be able to respond to the user. By splitting off the database connection into a separate thread you can make the application more responsive. ...


64

This is a Python bug. When waiting for a condition in threading.Condition.wait(), KeyboardInterrupt is never sent. Repro: import threading cond = threading.Condition(threading.Lock()) cond.acquire() cond.wait(None) print "done" The KeyboardInterrupt exception won't be delivered until wait() returns, and it never returns, so the interrupt never happens. ...


53

I've used MPI extensively on large clusters with multi-core nodes. I'm not sure if it's the right thing for a single multi-core box, but if you anticipate that your code may one day scale larger than a single chip, you might consider implementing it in MPI. Right now, nothing scales larger than MPI. I'm not sure where the posters who mention unacceptable ...


52

Restructure your code so that the f() function is defined before you create instance of Pool. Otherwise the worker cannot see your function. #!/usr/bin/python # -*- coding: utf-8 -*- from multiprocessing import Pool def f(x): return x*x p = Pool(1) p.map(f, [1, 2, 3])


51

You can use the shared memory stuff from multiprocessing together with Numpy fairly easily: import multiprocessing import ctypes import numpy as np shared_array_base = multiprocessing.Array(ctypes.c_double, 10*10) shared_array = np.ctypeslib.as_array(shared_array_base.get_obj()) shared_array = shared_array.reshape(10, 10) #-- edited 2015-05-01: the assert ...


50

The problem is that multiprocessing must pickle things to sling them among processes, and bound methods are not picklable. The workaround (whether you consider it "easy" or not;-) is to add the infrastructure to your program to allow such methods to be pickled, registering it with the copy_reg standard library method. For example, Steven Bethard's ...


47

After some more googling I found the answer here. It turns out that certain Python modules (numpy, scipy, tables, pandas, skimage...) mess with core affinity on import. As far as I can tell, this problem seems to be specifically caused by them linking against multithreaded OpenBLAS libraries. A workaround is to reset the task affinity using ...


46

I just now wrote a log handler of my own that just feeds everything to the parent process via a pipe. I've only been testing it for ten minutes but it seems to work pretty well. (Note: This is hardcoded to RotatingFileHandler, which is my own use case.) Update: Implementation! This now uses a queue for correct handling of concurrency, and also ...


46

Here is a list of what can be pickled. In particular, functions are only picklable if they are defined at the top-level of a module. This piece of code: import multiprocessing as mp class Foo(): @staticmethod def work(self): pass pool = mp.Pool() foo = Foo() pool.apply_async(foo.work) pool.close() pool.join() yields an error almost ...


46

Your problem is that you join each job immediately after you started it: for g in grid: p = multiprocessing.Process(target=worker, args=(g,GRID_hx)) jobs.append(p) p.start() p.join() join blocks until the respective process has finished working. This means that your code starts only one process at once, waits until it is finished and then ...


45

What Giulio Franco says is true for multithreading vs. multiprocessing in general. However, Python* has an added issue: There's a Global Interpreter Lock that prevents two threads in the same process from running Python code at the same time. This means that if you have 8 cores, and change your code to use 8 threads, it won't be able to use 800% CPU and run ...


43

Intro There seems to be a lot of arm-chair suggestions and no working examples. None of the answers listed here even suggest using multiprocessing and this is quite a bit disappointing and disturbing. As python lovers we should support our built-in libraries, and while parallel processing and synchronization is never a trivial matter, I believe it can be ...


43

On Windows there is no fork() routine, so multiprocessing imports the current module to get access to the worker function. Without the if statement the child process starts its own children and so on.


41

What you are looking for is the process pool class in multiprocessing. import multiprocessing import subprocess def work(cmd): return subprocess.call(cmd, shell=False) if __name__ == '__main__': count = multiprocessing.cpu_count() pool = multiprocessing.Pool(processes=count) print pool.map(work, ['ls'] * count) And here is a calculation ...


40

The problem is in this line: with pattern.findall(row) as f: You are using the with statement. It requires an object with __enter__ and __exit__ methods. But pattern.findall returns a list, with tries to store the __exit__ method, but it can't find it, and raises an error. Just use f = pattern.findall(row) instead.


40

If you use an operating system that uses copy-on-write fork() semantics (like any common unix), then as long as you never alter your data structure it will be available to all child processes without taking up additional memory. You will not have to do anything special (except make absolutely sure you don't alter the object). The most efficient thing you ...


38

Tag files are typically the way to go if you have a number of logically coherent source files (let's call them components) and you know the dependencies between the components, e.g. component A uses component B and C, and component B only uses C, and It is ok (or even preferred) that the index files (e.g. the list of a files/classes/functions) are ...


38

The initialize function is called thus: def worker(...): ... if initializer is not None: initializer(*args) so there is no return value saved anywhere. You might think this dooms you, but no! Each worker is in a separate process. Thus, you can use an ordinary global variable. This is not exactly pretty, but it works: cursor = None def ...


37

Parallel.For doesn't divide the input into n pieces (where n is the MaxDegreeOfParallelism); instead it creates many small batches and makes sure that at most n are being processed concurrently. (This is so that if one batch takes a very long time to process, Parallel.For can still be running work on other threads. See Parallelism in .NET - Part 5, ...


36

My solution has an extra bell and whistle to make sure that the order of the output has the same as the order of the input. I use multiprocessing.queue's to send data between processes, sending stop messages so each process knows to quit checking the queues. I think the comments in the source should make it clear what's going on but if not let me know. ...


36

Try this: using (TransactionScope scope = new TransactionScope(TransactionScopeOption.Required, new TransactionOptions { IsolationLevel = IsolationLevel.RepeatableRead })) { var newUrl = dbEntity.URLs.FirstOrDefault(url => url.StatusID == (int) URLStatus.New); if(newUrl != null) { newUrl.StatusID = (int) URLStatus.InProcess; ...


35

I also was annoyed by restrictions on what sort of functions pool.map could accept. I wrote the following to circumvent this. It appears to work, even for recursive use of parmap. from multiprocessing import Process, Pipe from itertools import izip def spawn(f): def fun(pipe,x): pipe.send(f(x)) pipe.close() return fun def ...


35

The multiprocessing.pool.Pool class creates the worker processes in its __init__ method, makes them daemonic and starts them, and it is not possible to re-set their daemon attribute to False before they are started (and afterwards it's not allowed anymore). But you can create your own sub-class of multiprocesing.pool.Pool (multiprocessing.Pool is just a ...


34

My initial thought was to use partial, and as J.F. Sebastian indicated, partial works in this instance in Python >=2.7, so I am posting this, with the caveat that it won't work in 2.6. Also note that in the above code, you're passing the result of harvester(text, case) instead of the function harvester itself. Also, you aren't returning anything; you'll ...


33

Your question is a tad vague -- it would be nice to see some code -- but a general answer involves using a Manager object. Adapted from the docs: from multiprocessing import Process, Manager def f(d): d[1] += '1' d['2'] += 2 if __name__ == '__main__': manager = Manager() d = manager.dict() d[1] = '1' d['2'] = 2 p1 = ...



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