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9

I like Sandor's suggestion of using Ken Stanley's NEAT algorithm. NEAT was designed to evolve neural networks with arbitrary topologies, but those are just basically directed graphs. There were many ways to evolve neural networks before NEAT, but one of NEAT's most important contributions was that it provided a way to perform meaningful crossover between ...


9

Pure and impure functional programming Pure functions are inherently referentially transparent, which allows memoization (caching the result). Lack of mutable state permits reentrancy, allows different versions of linked data structures to share memory, and makes automatic parallelization possible. The point is that by restricting yourself from mutating ...


9

In this case, I'd avoid a mutable implementation because a functional implementation can compete pretty well in terms of performance. Here are three versions (including the built-in remove-duplicates) of the function: #lang racket (define (make-uniquer) (let ([uniques (make-hash)]) (lambda (x) (if (not (hash-ref uniques x #f)) ...


8

As the error message indicates, you can use a ref cell instead: let counter() = let x = ref 0 let increment(y :int) = x := !x + y // this line is giving me trouble printfn "%A" !x // and this one too increment // return the function This does exactly what your code would do if it were legal. The ! operator gets the value ...


8

As Leppie points out, looping constructs manage to recover the space savings of proper tail calling, for the particular kinds of loops that they support. The only problem with looping constructs is that the ones you have are never enough, unless you just hurl the ball into the user's court and force them to model the stack explicitly. To take an example, ...


7

The String class API documentation page is a good place to start looking for answers. Also, if you're looking to have a future as a programmer, you should put more effort into research before asking arround for free answers.


7

Add subTree option as well, it should work, you want to monitor not just children of document ( head/body) but it's descendants as well. (And that is the reason when set to document.body it works). observer.observe(document, { attributes: true, childList: true, characterData: true, subtree:true }); Fiddle From documentation subtree: ...


7

The easiest way is to use recursion open System let rec makelist l = match l |> List.length with |6 -> printfn "all done"; l | _ -> makelist ((Console.ReadLine())::l) makelist [] I also removed some the addValue function as it is far more idiomatic to just use :: in typical F# code. Your original code also has a common problem ...


5

Your addToCount does not add 1 (or anything) to count. It calculates count + 1. (Same as Java would...) I suppose you meant this: ... def addToCount { count += 1 } ...


5

It can be done via references: let fact n = let result = ref 1 in (* initialize an int ref *) for i = 2 to n do result := i * !result (* reassign an int ref *) done; !result You do not see references very often because you can do the same thing using immutable values inside recursion or high-order functions: let fact n = let rec loop i ...


5

Laziness means that a function is not actually evaluated until (or unless) its return value is used. This means that function calls aren't necessarily evaluated in the order in which they appear in the code. It also means that there can't be void-functions because they would never be evaluated (as its not possible to use a return value that does not exist). ...


5

You are probably better off using a document filter or a custom document. What are other listeners expected to see if the document doesn't stay the same during event dispatch?


4

Use SwingUtilities.invokeLater() placing all the modifications there


4

The problem: How set! works. What it really does is bind a name to an object that is hanging around in memory somewhere. When you do set!, it changes what that name refers to. That's the error: (Frame-variables res) isn't an identifier, so it can't make it refer to something else. The fix: What you're trying to do is mutate a member of a struct. What ...


4

The reason is that in the assignPlayersToTables method, you are creating a new Table object. You can confirm this by adding some debugging into the loop: val tableNumber : Int = playSample % numTables println(tables(tableNumber)) tables(tableNumber).registerPlayer(new Player(playSample)) Yielding something like: Main$$anon$1$Table@5c73a7ab Registering ...


4

As others already explained, you can rewrite imperative loops using recursion. This is useful because it is an approach that always works and is quite fundamental to functional programming. Alternatively, F# provides a rich set of library functions for working with collections, which can actually nicely express the logic that you need. So, you could write ...


3

Well, there are two generic ways of dealing with accumulation: recursion and folding. Let's look into very simple examples of each, to compute the sum of values of a list. def sumRecursively(list: List[Int]): Int = { def recurse(list: List[Int], acc: Int): Int = if (list.isEmpty) acc else recurse(list.tail, acc + list.head) recurse(list, 0) } ...


3

To expand on the "mutability makes parallelism hard" concept, when you have multiple cores going, you have to use synchronisation if you want to modify something from one core and have it be seen consistently by all the other cores. Getting synchronisation right is hard. If you over-synchronise, you have deadlocks, slow (serial rather than parallel) ...


3

Usually the mating process includes cross-over and mutation, so to answer your question a standard way of doing this is to take the parents, apply cross-over and only then mutate the final result (before calling it a child). The reason for this is that if you apply mutation to the parents there's basically 'too much mutation' going on (assuming the ...


3

public class MyString .java { this is wrong. remove ". java"


3

You are using MyString .java as the class name. Java does not allow space and period to be part of a valid class name. I guess you meant MyString. Also variables string and middle3 are not initialized before their use.


3

java.lang.String int length() Returns the length of this string. char charAt(int index) Returns the char value at the specified index. String toUpperCase() Converts all of the characters in this String to upper case using the rules of the default locale. String concat(String str) Concatenates the specified string to the end of this string. String ...


3

You can't throttle the multation rate this way. You need to separate the mutated bit from the probability of the mutation occuring. for (int z = 0; z < Binscale; z++) { if (rand() % 100 < MutationRate) { // flip bit Child1.binary_code[z] += 1; Child1.binary_code[z] %= 2; } } ...


3

You might as well try Genetic Programming. A graph would be the closest thing to a tree and GP uses trees... if you still want to use GAs instead of GPs then take a look at how crossover is performed on a GP and that might give you an idea how to perform it on the graphs of your GA: Here is how crossover for trees (and graphs) works: You select 2 ...


3

The list() call is making a new list with shallow-copied lists from the original. Try this (stolen from here): from copy import deepcopy listB = deepcopy(listA)


3

As long as you call close() on your BatchWriters after adding all mutations, you'll be fine. The close() method will block on the client side.


3

Question is a bit old, but the problem doesn't seem to be outdated or solved, so I think my research still might be helpful for someone. As far as mutation and crossover is quite trivial in the TSP problem, where every mutation is valid (that is because chromosome represents an order of visiting fixed nodes - swapping order then always can create a valid ...


3

A better data structure would make this easy. For example, instead of this: {country_name: [location, population, president]} … let's say you had this: {country_name: {'location': location, 'population': population, 'president': president}} Then your function would just be: def mutate_dic(dic, country_name, field, new_data): ...


2

First, the foo procedure is simply returning the parameter, it's not "executing" it. Answering your question, here's how you can reassign a value in Scheme: (define x 5) (set! x (+ x 4)) (set! x (* x 2)) (display x) But to tell the truth, that style of programming (mutating variables) is frowned upon in Scheme. I believe this is more idiomatic: (let* ((x ...


2

You can indeed write such a macro, if you can guarantee that the variable you're updating is always the first operand: (define-syntax foo (syntax-rules () ((foo (op var arg ...)) (set! var (op var arg ...)))))



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