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69

Editor templates work by convention. The name of the template must match the name of the type. So for example if SomeValue is an int type you could write a custom editor template at ~/Views/Shared/EditorTemplates/Int32.cshtml which will be used. In this case all integer types will use this custom template when you write @Html.EditorFor(model => ...


47

@Html.EditorFor(x=> item.Enabled) It's been pointed up many times that posting such a model will not work in mvc by default. For properly editing with EditorFor in a loop - for should be used as in: @for(var i = 0; i< Model.Users.Count;i++){ Html.EditorFor(i=>Model.Users[i]) }


21

You may checkout Brad Wilson's blog post about the default templates used in ASP.NET MVC. When you have a model property of type Enum it is the string template that is being rendered. So you could customize this string editor template like this: ~/Views/Shared/EditorTemplates/String.cshtml: @model object @if (Model is Enum) { <div ...


19

@model bool? <div data-ui="buttonset"> @{ Dictionary<string, object> yesAttrs = new Dictionary<string, object>(); Dictionary<string, object> noAttrs = new Dictionary<string, object>(); Dictionary<string, object> nullAttrs = new Dictionary<string, object>(); yesAttrs.Add("id", ...


17

Use the [ScaffoldColumn(false)] attribute. E.g. public class Person { [ScaffoldColumn(false)] public int PersonID { get; set; } ... Solution and example sourced from: Pro ASP.NET MVC 3 Framework, Third Edition


17

Since the template wasn't invoked in the context of the main view it loses its context. You could define the prefix in this case as follows: public ActionResult Create([Bind(Prefix="Create")]CreateViewModel model) { ViewData.TemplateInfo.HtmlFieldPrefix = "Create"; return PartialView("~/Views/Shared/EditorTemplates/Template.cshtml", model); }


16

Thanks to Bryan for adding a bounty to try to get a positive solution, but I'm going to have to answer and say that I have found that the answer is definitely NO - you cannot have a nullable template auto-discovered from its type. You must use a template name. This is the relevant quote from Brad Wilson's blog at ...


16

TL;DR > Named templates don't work with collections, use a foreach loop to work around it - See below for extensive details about why, and an example. You said: Any idea why the EditorFor doesn’t use the template “OrderList” I specified in the “templateName" argument? Otherwise, what is that argument for? EditorFor is actually using the the ...


15

Late to answer but I hope this helps others. Ideally you want all enums to use your Enum template by convention, not by specifying a UIHint each time, and you can accomplish that by creating a custom model metadata provider like this: using System; using System.Collections.Generic; using System.Web.Mvc; public class CustomMetadataProvider : ...


14

You are right, those attributes (and specially the name attribute) are critical for the model binding. Say you want to create a custom helper like public static MvcHtmlString CustomHelperFor<TModel, TValue>(this HtmlHelper<TModel> html, Expression<Func<TModel, TValue>> expression) First you can use var fieldName = ...


13

Ok, got it The editor code in mvc looks for editors in the PartialViewLocationFormats for the engine adding DisplayTemplates or EditorTemplates to the path. So, I have created a new path under views ~/Views/Standard/ And plopped my standard stuff in there ~/Views/Standard/EditorTemplates/string.cshtml Now, register the new path in the engine in ...


12

You are calling editor from your editor. As @RPM1984 rephrases @darin-dmitrov in comment in this answer: You can only have 1 template used at runtime for a given type, in a given Views particular context. If you change your view to render textbox instead of editor, it works, I just tried: <%@ Control Language="C#" ...


11

You could use an HTML helper to generate those inputs if you want HTML5 data-* validation attributes on them: @{ var validationAttributes = Html.GetUnobtrusiveValidationAttributes(""); } @Html.TextBox( "", Model.HasValue ? Model.Value.Date.ToString() : string.Empty, new RouteValueDictionary(validationAttributes) { { "class", ...


8

You missed the fact that both Scott's solution and the solution you link to don't do: <%= Html.TextBoxFor(model => model.LeaveRequest.DateOfLeave.Date) %> Instead they use: <%= Html.EditorFor(model => model.LeaveRequest.DateOfLeave.Date) %> And then utilize a custom editor to limit the field to just the Date (instead of both the date ...


8

Try putting the following inside your editor template: @model SomeViewModel @{ ViewData.TemplateInfo.HtmlFieldPrefix = Regex.Replace( ViewData.TemplateInfo.HtmlFieldPrefix, @"\[[0-9]+\]$", m => string.Format("[{0}]", Model.Id) ); }


8

One way is to create your own htmlhelper extension method. public static MvcHtmlString CheckBoxStringFor<TModel>(this HtmlHelper<TModel> html, Expression<Func<TModel, string>> expression) { // get the name of the property string[] propertyNameParts = expression.Body.ToString().Split('.'); string ...


8

You can only have 1 template used at runtime for a given type. ASP.NET MVC first looks in areas shared templates folder and since it finds a corresponding template there it picks it up and it uses it. It then stops looking and the template you put in the main shared folder is never used. It's by design. Is there any way i can tell it to go to the shared ...


8

Try this instead when creating the list of select items: var items = new SelectList( new[] { new { Value = "1", Text = "one" }, new { Value = "2", Text = "two" }, new { Value = "3", Text = "three" }, }, "Value", "Text", Model.Value ) Here is an explanation of why ...


7

Please refer to this and this for collections databinding, those are two ultimate resources for that.


7

You could also add a property on your viewmodel: public class MyFormField { public string Name { get; set; } public string Value { get; set; } public bool CheckBoxValue { get { return Boolean.Parse(Value); } } public MyFormType Type { get; set; } } Your view would be something like ...


7

You could use a custom model binder. Let's take an example. Model: public class MyViewModel { public IList<BaseClass> Children { get; set; } } public abstract class BaseClass { public int Id { get; set; } [HiddenInput(DisplayValue = false)] public string ModelType { get { return GetType().FullName; } } } public ...


6

I have solved this by replacing the code in my controller to : CountryList = new SelectList(countryList, "CountryId", "CountryName",52 /*Default Country Id*/) If you have better solutions, please let me know. I will change accepted answer.


6

Thank you all for your contributions Yngvebn, i tried your solution (in your last comment) before, but the only thing i didn't do is the <dynamic>, i used instead <Enum> in generic type. at last the solution is : create a template named Enum.acsx and put it under the Views\Shared\EditorTemplates <%@ Control Language="C#" ...


6

Although neither way is "wrong", I'd definitely say that outside is better. A form contributes to the flow of your application. When you try to follow the flow, it usually goes Controller > View, so putting a form into a partial view will do nothing but give you headaches. In my application, all forms are always in the primary view page, so that all ...


6

What am I missing here? Nothing. Unfortunately that's how it is. If you specify the template name when calling the Html.EditorFor or using an UIHint the template will be called for the list and not for each element. This being said you could of course write a custom extension method that will achieve this functionality: public static class ...


6

A very late response, useful if someone else bump in this very same question (as I did a few moments ago trying to remember how to do this) You can use the UIHintAttribute to define the name of the editor public class MyViewModel { [UIHint("MyModel")] public IEnumerable<ModelBase> Data { get; set; } }


6

Based on Pat Burke comment, I can use the UIHint data attribute combined with the good editor template. Here is an example (Editor Template): @Html.TextBox("", ViewData.TemplateInfo.FormattedModelValue, new { @class = "text-box single-line", placeholder = ViewData.ModelMetadata.Watermark, type = "number" }) (the ViewModel) public class ...


6

Here is short info about adding EditorTemplate. In short words - you have to create directory EditorTemplates in Views/Shared and you should create a view with the same name as the model you want to create the editor for. Remember that EditorTemplate for a model is used when calling Html.EditorFor with object of this model as argument. You should use them ...


6

There's some useful background on the default templates used by Html.Editor(For) and Html.Display(For) and how to override them using views in the Views/Shared/EditorTemplates and View/Shared/DisplayTemplates directory of your project here. I have a project on GitHub that contains Razor replacements for all of the default display and editor templates. Have ...


6

There are two ways to do this. The first way is to implement IModelBinder, which would require that you pass the TimeSpan as a separate parameter to your action and then set the model's TimeSpan property to it: [HttpPost] public ActionResult Index(YourViewModel model, [ModelBinder(typeof(TimeSpanModelBinder))] TimeSpan ts) { model.LengthOfTime = ...



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