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6

And now for my weekly "don't do that" answer... Creating a ViewModel for your UserControl is a code smell. You're experiencing this issue because of that smell, and it should be an indication that you're doing something wrong. The solution is to ditch the VM built for the UserControl. If it contains business logic, it should be moved to an appropriate ...


3

I looked at your code and was wondering about the setter for CurrentTime. The following: if (_currentTime != null) _currentTime = value; should probably be: if (_currentTime != value) _currentTime = value;


2

You can use ListBox.ItemsPanel to specify the type of panel you want - probably <StackPanel Orientation="Horizontal/>. <ListBox> <ListBox.ItemTemplate> <DataTemplate> <RadioButton GroupName="rbList" Tag="{Binding}" Content="{Binding Description}" /> </DataTemplate> </ListBox.ItemTemplate> ...


2

You can use RelativeSource with Mode set to PreviousData to identify whether dataGrid row is first one or not. For first row PreviousData will return null. Apply DataTrigger on DataGridRow in ItemContainerStyle: <DataGrid> <DataGrid.ItemContainerStyle> <Style TargetType="DataGridRow"> <Setter ...


2

You shouldn't persist a context I would recommend you abandon the single shared context. I did this recently for a large WPF application. A EF context is designed to be a unit-of-work, you should use it and then dispose. If you need to read in relationship properties lazily, you should use .Include() hints. You should your contexts in a using statement, so ...


2

The problem lies in the MVVMLight framework. Its RelayCommand was changed and does not listen to CommandManager.RequerySuggested any more. So you actually have to manually call RaiseCanExecuteChanged on the command. This sucks... See here for a discussion on this change in MVVMLight. Any idea, how to handle this without a ton of manual calls to ...


2

The reason is you are not calling the method on the right object: // Create a separate view model object, which the current view is not bound to ViewModel mv = new ViewModel(); mv.UpdateConsole(); This creates a new object and calls UpdateConsole on it, but the WPF view is looking at the ViewModel instance referred to by the DataContext property. What ...


1

If you take a look at how Marco is enabling OnNavigatedTo and OnNavigatedFrom calls to propagate to ViewModel in the blog post Calling ViewModel methods in response to Page navigation events using MVVM Light in WinRT you'll notice he uses INavigable interface and Activate and Deactivate methods. You could extend that INavigable interface with ...


1

In my Shell.xaml.cs I'd have this property defined: [Import] ShellViewModel ViewModel { set { this.DataContext = value; } } And then in my ShellViewModel class the constructor would be adorned like this ... [Export] public class ShellViewModel So relying on the MEF composition import/export attributes to achieve DataContext setting. ...


1

A Dictionary does not throw notifications... the only built in collection that throws the CollectionChanged event is ObservableCollection. You can either use both a dictionary and such a collection synced inside your application or use a custom dictionary implementation such as this: .NET ObservableDictionary UPDATE Just went over your code again. and if in ...


1

Instead of registering your User object in a static class, I suggest you to register the User instance in the Unity container itself. In your LoginViewModel, you should get an instance of your IUnityContainer class. public LoginViewModel(IUnityContainer container) { Container = container; } In your Login method, you register your user object: ...


1

@user469104 has it mostly right. If you want to have changes internal to an object propagate to the UI, you need to have that object implement INotifyPropertyChanged and raise PropertyChanged in the setter of the properties you care about. However, if this object is being used by the View/ViewModel directly (as yours is), this will work automatically. You ...


1

I would design it like so: Create a LogReader class. This is effectively part of the Model Have that class raise an UpdateProgress event The ViewModel owns a LogReader and listens to that event In the event callback, it sets a CurrentProgress property on the ViewModel The View's progress bar has Value="{Binding CurrentProgress}" Now you have nice ...


1

If you want to implement the conversion from user input to a ViewModel property you need to implement ConvertBack. See also the documentation for that. You return Nothing, this means that no matter what you type in the TextBox, Nothing will always be the resulting value from using the converter.


1

What is MVVM? The MVVM pattern includes three key parts: Model (Business rule, data access, model classes) View (User interface (XAML)) ViewModel (Agent or middle man between view and model) The ViewModel acts as an interface between Model and View. It provides data binding between View and model data as well as handles all UI actions by using command. ...


1

I'd recommend you to use the ListBox method instead of the one you mentioned. You may find it here: http://www.codeproject.com/Tips/807025/WPF-MVVM-Binding-for-Multiple-Radio-Buttons If you'd like to keep the "abstract" groups (custom and standard style architecture modeling), then one of the solution that comes to my mind now is to implement a TextBox in ...


1

There are 2 ways to do this a) Pass viewModels as parameters of the child flagRepairAsEdited function: data-bind="value: RepairCost, event: {change: flagRepairAsEdited.bind($data, $parent, $root)}" b) Save the link of the parent viewModel inside child viewModel WorkOrderViewModel = function (data, parent) { this.parent = parent; ... } And use ...


1

I would definitely use MVVMlight's messaging system since this gives you a clean and losely coupled callback that your viewmodels can subscribe to. In your push notification service class expose a couple of public message strings that your viewmodel can listen for: public static readonly string REFRESHCONTENTMESSAGE = "RefreshContent"; public static ...


1

I managed to track down an answer from this link. http://www.codeproject.com/Articles/80632/WPF-Context-Menu-on-List-Item Worked great. Thanks for any help.Appreciated. Scott


1

Normally in the situation you're describing I use this solution. In order to know which items in your DataGrid are selected (in a MVVM application) you don't need to expose an ObservableCollection as a DependencyProperty. In your DataGridRow model you add a property: public bool IsSelected { get { return isSelected; } set { ...


1

MVVM should avoid referencing presentation assemblies from your view models. You need to call the new window from your view model, so how do you break the dependency? The same way we break every dependency - an interface! I usually call this an interaction service as a window is an interactivity object. There may be varying opinions on this. YMMV etc. ...


1

There is an attempt to add the same current item (ScanningItem) instance multiple times. Consider creating a new item after adding the previous one to the collection: private void AddItem() { ScannedItems.Add(ScanningItem); ScanningItem = new Item(); } Please introduce firing of PropertyChanged event when the value of ScanningItem property is ...


1

*.xaml.cs files are just the code-behind for the View, and as such, are part of that layer (as the other answer notes). As you guessed, the *ViewModel.cs files compose the various view models. That naming convention is pretty standard. Defining the Model is somewhat tricky, as it changes based on the application. In general, its the "core" of your ...



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