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0

What you can do is to divide the solution of this problem into several levels: First, create a bindable property for the checkbox and call it is Checked. I have written a snippit for it but did not really compile it so you might want to modify it if it did not work public static readonly BindableProperty IsCheckedProperty = ...


1

What's happening is that your Authenticate method is executing CheckCredentials on another thread, then returning control to your view. What this means is that you will (sometimes) get to this line: if(!ValidationViewModel.validPassword) before CheckCredentials has been called. You're seeing false because that's the default value for booleans - it hasn't ...


0

If your ViewModel is derived from a base class, let's say NonGenericViewModel then you can assign in code behind an object of type NonGenericViewModel to the DataContext. Using this way you still have the benefits of generics and the data binding will also work because the bindings will be made during runtime, no matter what type of object you assign to ...


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You could create a class that inherits from your generic ViewModel and use that public class PersonViewModel : ViewModel<Person> XAML: <UserControl.DataContext> <s:PersonViewModel/> </UserControl.DataContext>


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You're not capable of setting a generic viewmodel in XAML because XAML requires known types at compile time. Dependency injection is your best bet public class MyControl : UserControl{ public MyControl(Object viewModel){ this.DataContext = viewModel; } }


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I have never enjoyed using CollectionViewSource. I would instead filter using a new property in my ViewModel that filters using Linq: public IEnumerable<MyType> FilteredItems() { get { return MyCollection.Where(x => x.MyProperty == SomeValue).ToArray; } } I would then bind ItemsSource to this property and use ...


-1

I am building WPF (MVVM) app How one organizes data using a paradigm such as MVVM is not a per-requisite to control building. MVVM concepts are not required to build or use a control. Are there any tutorials on how to build such a control in WPF or Silverlight? No but use these components Slider Class (System.Windows.Controls): Override the ...


1

You can't change the selection while the selection is changing... If that makes any sense :P If the selection has just changed, you'll have to wait until you can change it programmatically once again. This would be usually done using Dispatcher.BeginInvoke to add your call to the Dispatcher queue, so it executes after the current selection is processed. if ...


-2

Check out Charles Petzold article on using scroll bars to get a similar sort of effect - only problem is getting it to work for 360 degrees of scrolling. You can then use XAML to style it.


-2

Your best option would be to create a new ControlTemplate for the WPF Slider control. This circular Slider might be a good starting point


0

The problem seems to be the ItemsSource binding. When you navigate to other view, the ItemsSource binding returns null, items from combobox are removed, SelectedItem is set to null and SelectedItem.Binding updates updates Pen property. You can try one of following: Try to use OneTime binding in the ItemsSource property, so it is not cleared. ViewModel's ...


2

Simplest but very powerfull solution to control your views' life is using converter instead of datatemplates: <ContentControl Content="{Binding CurrentPageViewModel, Converter={StaticResource ViewModelToViewConverter}"/> public class ViewModelToViewConverter: IValueConverter { public object Convert(object value, Type targetType, object ...


0

I am trying to avoid Prism library to keep my control simple as possible from point of view of mount of reference assemblies and I ended up with this solution _cmd = new RelayCommand(async delegate { await Task.Run(() => <YourMethod>()); }, delegate { return !IsInProgress; }) ); Seems to be working well. (if you don't need to pass ...


5

Rise event with empty string RaisePropertyChanged(""); this will trigger update for all properties.


1

The view gets removed from the "active views" (inside the ViewManager) as soon as it is unloaded. That it keeps its view model in memory for when it is being loaded again doesn't change the fact that the view is currently not being used. One solution is to create your own IViewManager (everything is pluggable in Catel), then you can somehow create a ...


1

string propertyName = "ModifyFilesIconVisibility"; var property = TypeDescriptor.GetProperties(this).Find(propertyName, false); property.SetValue(this, Visibility.Visible); assuming this points to the instance with ModifyFilesIconVisibility property


0

One view can consist of many views. So, if one of your viewmodel is too big, you could consider creating new viewmodels and views which could be nested in the main viewmodel. That could be one way to do this.


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You could also work with partial Classes to separate different concerns. +1 for this good question.


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The first thing that comes to mind is that you should not have all that code in your MainWindowViewModel, it should only act as a container for your embedded views and handle global events and such. So try to modularize it as much as possible into multiple views (with correct naming which tells you the purpose of the view). I am pretty certain that the ...


0

Looking at your code, instead of defining new ConversionViewModel(), grab the instance of the ConversionViewModel and then set property on it. public class ConversionViewModel() { private static ConversionViewModel _this; public ConversionViewModel() { InitializeComponent(); _this = this; } public ...


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Check out this brilliant tutorial/example: https://code.msdn.microsoft.com/windowsdesktop/Best-ComboBox-Tutorial-5cc27f82


1

I personally use a custom mark-up extension, there's a good article about it here. I also give it a custom namespace which allows me to write XAML like this: <Label Content="{Translate 'First Name:'}" /> In addition to this I've written two utilities. The first searches all my XAML files for occurrences of the "{Translate ...}" mark-up and it saves ...


0

Your user control never gets notified about changes in MyUserControlViewModel.TestChecked property and that's why the view is never updated. One thing you can do to fix this is to subscribe to your SingletonVM.PropertyChanged event in the constructor of MyUserControlViewModel. Your ISingletonVM needs to inherit from INotifyPropertyChanged. So the constructor ...


0

Look at my answer for the following question - Context Menu items command binding WPF using MVVM Hope it helps!


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You have to setyour ContextMenu's DataContext to your ViewModel. One way to do this is by having an Opened eventhandler for the context menu. Take a look at my answer in the below link - Context Menu items command binding WPF using MVVM


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I had the same issue. The command bindings stopped working once I moved them to the ViewModel from code behind. And in the viewmodel I had to change my ICommand from RoutedCommand to DelegateCommand. I was able to get it working in the following way - Add Opened eventhandler to your context menu - <ContextMenu x:Key="columnHeaderMenu" ...


0

I found a suitable solution for this Problem, maybe it's going to help somebody else. Since both the SelectedProvider in the Viewmodel and the single Properties of it implement INotifyPropertyChanged (trhough ViewModelBase or ObservableObject) I can simply subscribe to the SelectedProvider.PropertyChanged in the ViewModel. public MainViewModel() { // ...


0

There are 2 ways of approaching MVVM design: view-first and viewmodel-first. Although they are both valid, they have their ups and downs. And both make sure that the viewmodels do not depend on the views in any way, only views depend on the viewmodels. Your solution is valid MVVM, but causes circular dependencies between the view and viewmodel layers. So I ...


0

So this is MY approach: Have a table in the database with the localized values Table Departments_Localized_Names IdDepartment -> Foreign key to the original department culture -> Relate to the culture/language LocalizedDisplayName -> Translated department name Using a partial entity class or even better a data transfer object, add ...


0

Change the UpdateSourceTrigger on the SelectedItem binding to Default


1

In the model-view-viewmodel design, most of the domain specific logic and behaviour actually ends up in the model. This is called the domain model in domain-driven-design. That domain code might be reused in several deployment units/applications/services in your business, so they are independent of the actual WPF application you are writing. The viewmodel ...


-1

change the itemssource binding and try once. I mean instead of binding from Relative source datacontext, try to bind from viewModel and check once.


0

That kind of depends on what's the actual logic that drives the change in the visual. For example, if it's some kind of business logic related state, you can expose a State property in your view model and use a converter to bind to it. If it doesn't depend on a BL state, it would be OK MVVM-wise to modify the visual from the view's code behind, since it's ...


0

View: <ComboBox ItemsSource="{Binding Options}" SelectedItem="{Binding SelectedOption}" Width="200"/> <ListBox ItemsSource="{Binding lst}" Grid.Row="1"> ViewModel: public class MainViewModel:INotifyPropertyChanged { private string selectedOption; public string SelectedOption { get { return ...


0

You can add a DependencyProperty to your viewmodel which contains the SelectedItem public static readonly DependencyProperty SelectedItemProperty = DependencyProperty.Register( "SelectedItem", typeof(YourType), typeof(YourViewModel), new FrameworkPropertyMetadata( new PropertyChangedCallback(OnSelectedItemChanged) ...


1

make 2 lists and bind one of them to your listbox according to the selection. e.g: List <string> Fruits=new List<string>(){"apple","banana",..}; List <string> Vegetables=new List<string>(){"tomato","Potato",..}; and in your Combox selection change event: private void OComboBox1Changed(object sender, SelectionChangedEventArgs e) { ...


0

Does the Node class implement the INotifyPropertyChanged interface? Do you raise the PropertyChanged event when the property RecSpeicherplatz changes?


1

That's bad MVVM, the ViewModel should not have any implementation knowledge of the UI. By passing a UIElement to the ViewModel you are breaking the pattern. Instead, pass the SelectedDate as the command parameter and bind the BlackoutDates property to a collection of DateTimes in the ViewModel?


0

You should not call notify directly on the viewmodel. It's private: http://docs.sencha.com/extjs/5.0/5.0.1-apidocs/#!/api/Ext.app.ViewModel-method-notify Just set the data by calling vm.setData({}). onChange: function(cb, newValue, oldValue) { var vm = this.getViewModel(); console.log('newValue', newValue); console.log('oldValue', oldValue); ...


0

It wouldn't be wise to allow any model to be coupled with a view model, simply because of type safety. For example, if your view model expects a Movie, and instead, at run-time, you get a Genre, how can the view model be expected to behave using this model? Maybe I'm completely missing your requirements, but you could instead use a generic view model base: ...


0

I would highly question your decision to "run both view and viewmodel method on button click". To me, it seems that what you want is that button runs a viewmodel command which in turn causes some change in view. What if for example it was possible to execute the method not through UI but from somewhere else in the application. Shouldn't the view change also? ...


1

You can do this entirely in XAML with interaction triggers: <Button Content="Do Something" Click="OnClickHandler" xmlns:i="clr-namespace:System.Windows.Interactivity;assembly=System.Windows.Interactivity" xmlns:cmd ="http://www.galasoft.ch/mvvmlight"> <i:Interaction.Triggers> <i:EventTrigger ...


0

Bind the ListView with ItemsSource to ObervableCollection / CollectionView in your VM and SelectedItem to DataTypeSelectedItem Property in your VM. For example View: <ListView Name="ListViewWithCustomItems" SelectedItem="{Binding SelectedCustomItem}" SelectionMode="Single" ItemsSource="{Binding ...


0

static Dictionary<Type, Type> TypeMap = new Dictionary<Type, Type> { {typeof(ModelA), typeof(ViewModelA)}, {typeof(ModelB), typeof(ViewModelB)}, {typeof(ModelC), typeof(ViewModelC)} }; static ViewModelBase CreateViewModel(ModelBase someObject) { return Activator.CreateInstance(TypeMap[someObject.GetType()]); }


0

The problem is that your ContentControl can only bind to one thing at a time. As soon as you change your view model the binding to the old one no longer exists, so there's nothing to fade. To fix this you'll either have to set up two overlapping UserControls and fade them in/out separately, or use a helper class to take care of it for you.


0

Declare your members virtual and use something like Castle Dynamic Proxy to inject change notification automatically: http://ayende.com/blog/4106/nhibernate-inotifypropertychanged This has to be used with care when your models are being created in your data layer because it returns a new instance entirely. Your database code will think the object has ...


0

This is what dependency injection frameworks are designed to solve. Yes, it's yet another technology to add to your project, but once you start using DI you never look back. The real problem here is that you're trying to make this decision in your view models when you really should be employing inversion of control and making the decision higher up. A ...


0

You should have a reference of the original collection somewhere, and do all calculations over that one. For instance, you could have a single method that gets called whenever a CheckBox is checked or unchecked, and have that method filter/group the original collection. // Simplified properties private IEnumerable<FileData> FileRecordCollection; ...


0

When I want to filter a collection like this I have a property like this: public IEnumerable<FileData> FilteredFiles { get { if (Unique) { return Files.GroupBy(item => item.TID).Select(grp => grp.First()); } else { return Files.GroupBy(item => item.CID).Select(grp => ...


0

You can capture the keydown event of all ComboBox controls using the following code: kendo.ui.ComboBox.fn._keydown = function(e) { if (e.which == 13) { alert("key pressed!"); } }; This also works with the DropDownList widget that generally doesn't support the keypress events.



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