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5

Your form elements have no name attributes. You cannot rely on an "id" alone. <input type="text" class="form-control" id="username" placeholder="Enter username"> and <input type="text" class="form-control" id="pwd" placeholder="Enter password"> You need to add them, since you are declaring $myusername=$_POST['username']; ...


4

This should do it: SELECT * FROM User u1 INNER JOIN User u2 on u2.id_company = u1.id_company INNER JOIN Ticket t on t.id_author = u2.id_user WHERE u1.Name = @SessionUser


3

You have to select max(rank) and self-join to get the associated description select t1.type, t1.max_rank, t2.description from ( select max(rank) max_rank, type from mytable group by type ) t1 join mytable t2 on t1.type = t2.type and t1.max_rank = t2.rank order by t1.max_rank desc or using not exists select * from mytable t1 where not exists ( ...


3

you're escaping too many times. just be simple about it: echo '<td><img src="'.$value['img'].'"/></td>'; You could also do it this way: echo "<td><img src='{$value['img']}' /></td>";


2

Using a distinct query can accomplish your goal. SELECT DISTINCT(col1) FROM `Table`;


2

Note that you have to use raw methods to be able to run SQL functions like LENGTH(). This should work: DB::table('cards') ->select('colors') ->distinct() ->orderByRaw('LENGTH(colors) DESC') ->get();


2

As pointed in the comments, from MySQL documentation: mysql> SELECT LAST_INSERT_ID(); -> 195 This LAST_INSERT_ID() function is not subject to a race condition like SELECT MAX(id) might be, because it's maintained within MySQL specific to your connection. It returns the ID generated for your last insert, not anybody's last insert.


2

This is your query: SELECT c.*, (SELECT COUNT(DISTINCT sc.userId) FROM subscriber_category sc JOIN email e ON e.id = sc.userId JOIN domain d ON d.id = e.domainId WHERE sc.categoryId = c.id AND e.blackList = 0 AND d.blackList = 0 ) AS qty FROM category c WHERE c.userId = 1 ORDER ...


2

I want to make sure that for every doll in the doll_item table, [every] corresponding item comes from a [different] category Use a composite UNIQUE KEY. I fear that this relation does not enforce that the item_id and item_category_id from the items table necessarily come from the same row Use a compound FOREIGN KEY.: CREATE TABLE item ( id INT ...


2

Try something like: INSERT INTO result (no, total, average) SELECT no, A+B+C+D, (A+B+C+D)/4 FROM marks


2

DBIx::Class is the best in class for an object-relational mapper in Perl. It will take care of all the SQL to add, update, delete and search and will do it efficiently. You tell it the tables, columns, keys and relationships. DBIx::Class::Schema::Loader can even do that part for you.


2

Try this: def index @calls = Call.where(status: ['open', 'pending']) end It's considered good practice to make sure these where calls don't leak into your controller, because they're exposing a lot of the internals of Call. You can define a scope inside the Call class: class Call < ActiveRecord::Base scope :open_or_pending, -> { where(status: ...


2

You clearly have an error in your second SQL query : UPDATE studentreg SET ( regNo , name , sname , idNo , age , birthD , gen , national , relegion , fee , institute , pro , sDay , eMail , phnNo, address , img ) VALUES (?,?,?,?,?,?,?,?,?,?,?,?,?,?,?,?,?) WHERE regNo = '+rNo+ An update must be defined in this form : UPDATE studentreg SET regNo = ?, name ...


2

You need to put quotes around the inclusion of the $db variable. Change this line: $sql1="SELECT TABLE_NAME FROM INFORMATION_SCHEMA.TABLES WHERE TABLE_TYPE = 'BASE TABLE' AND TABLE_SCHEMA=".$db." order by create_time desc limit 1"; To: $sql1="SELECT TABLE_NAME FROM INFORMATION_SCHEMA.TABLES WHERE TABLE_TYPE = 'BASE TABLE' AND ...


2

Just move the condition to the on clause: SELECT events.id AS event_id, GROUP_CONCAT(DISTINCT(people.first_name)) AS attending FROM events LEFT JOIN events_people ON events.id = events_people.event_id LEFT JOIN people ON events_people.person_id = people.id LEFT JOIN feed ON events_people.person_id = feed.person_id AND ...


2

Probably your easiest bet is to not listen for your mysql db being updated, but rather handle it as part of the pusher event handler. So when your pusher client receives an update, you would (at that point) both save to your mysql db as well as publish your own update to clients listening on socket.io connections.


2

As a general rule of thumb, the reason the optimizer chooses to use an index in a where clause is to reduce the number of data pages being read. So, if your data is spread randomly over the pages, the important question is how many records are on each page and how many records is the filter selecting. Say there are 100 records on each page. Then a random ...


1

I think you need to do some research and reading on using indexes. Even from your own example, you expect an index on the "id" column because you are looking for a specific ONE... But then its not important to have an index on IS_QUALIFIED because it can have only 2 possible values... But the ID with alpha-numeric can have billions of values. Indexes ...


1

SELECT *, `student`.`id` as `studentid`, t.* FROM `student` LEFT JOIN `grade` ON `grade`.`student_id` = `student`.`id` LEFT JOIN `test` t ON `t`.`id` = `grade`.`test_id` WHERE `student`.`schoolyear_id` = ? and test_id = ?


1

Just set a hidden value of ID in your html like so <td> <?php echo $row_Assignment['technician']; ?> <form action="" method="post"> <input type="hidden" name="assignment_id" value="".$row_Assignment['ID'].""> <input type="submit" name="customerButton" id="customerButton" value="Add"> </form> </td> Then ...


1

The length of a varchar column is fixed to the length you declare when you create the table. The length can be any value from 0 to 255 (before MySQL 5.0.3) and from 0 to 65,535 (in MySQL 5.0.3 and later). The storage of the varchar is the bytes of data with the addition of one or two bytes to declare the length of the string. If the maximum length is 255 ...


1

You have a redundant closing bracket ()) in your query after "365": $sth = $dbh->prepare (" SELECT SUM(amount), SUM(amount) * 365 FROM spending ");


1

The problem is here: INSERT INTO stickynotes.stickynotes (id, note, created) VALUES (NULL, 'Let's see if it will work with my iPhone', NULL); Try: INSERT INTO stickynotes.stickynotes (id, note, created) VALUES (NULL, 'Let''s see if it will work with my iPhone', NULL); The error is here : Let''s see if it will work with my iPhone


1

Use ${variable} syntax: $sql = "INSERT INTO ${prefix}request_products (created_at, request_id) VALUES (NOW(), :request_id)";


1

The manual here: http://php.net/manual/pl/language.types.string.php says: "Enclose the variable name in curly braces to explicitly specify the end of the name." So this should make you happy: $prefix = 'de_'; $sql = "INSERT INTO ${prefix}request_products (created_at, request_id) VALUES (NOW(), :request_id)";


1

You can get the nicks who have scored in the past week using an aggregation: SELECT pl.nick FROM points_log pl GROUP BY pl.nick HAVING MAX(pl.dt) < NOW() - INTERVAL 1 WEEK; I'm not sure what you want as final output, but this will return the nicks that have scored in the past week.


1

If you are worrying about data load, my suggestion would be to modify your structure above to record which day(s) of the week an event occurs on: activity_id | start_date | end_date | days_of_week and only have one row in the DB for that event. Then, I would create a "blacklist" table, so if a user decides the event won't occur on specific days and ...


1

Is this what you are looking for? select t.* from users u join tickets t on u.id_user = t.id_author where u.company_id = (select u2.company_id from users u2 where u2.id_user = 'UserA');


1

To start, you should know that the question and it's solution mentioned in your question are a little bit different from your question and it's solution. That's why you can not use only JOINs without sub-queries. Tables : Countries : =========================== | id | name | =========================== | 1 | country 1 | ...


1

Putting the records into an array would destroy the best feature of a using a datareader: that you only need to allocate memory for one record at a time. Try doing something like this: public IEnumerable<T> getData<T>(string query, Func<IDataRecord, T> transform) { using (var conn = new MySqlConnection(conn_string)) using ...



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