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65

If you want plain C exports, use a C project not C++. C++ DLLs rely on name-mangling for all the C++isms (namespaces etc...). You can compile your code as C by going into your project settings under C/C++->Advanced, there is an option "Compile As" which cooresponds to the compiler switches /TP and /TC. Exporting/Importing DLL Libs in VC++ What you really ...


30

You can use c++filt to demangle c++ symbols. For instance $ c++filt -n _Z1fv f()


14

Instead of using .def file just insert pragma comment like this #pragma comment(linker, "/EXPORT:SomeFunction=_SomeFunction@@@23mangledstuff#@@@@")


13

using namespace std; instructs the compiler to search for undecorated names (ie, ones without ::s) in std as well as the root namespace. Now, the tolower you're looking at is part of the C library, and thus in the root namespace, which is always on the search path, but can also be explicitly referenced with ::tolower. There's also a std::tolower however, ...


11

You can get what you want by turning off debug info generation. Project + Properties, Linker, Debugging, Generate Debug Info = No. Naturally, you only want to do this for the Release build. Where the option is already set that way.


9

c++filt, example usage here: Can we see the template instantiated code by C++ compiler


9

It would be very unusual for the computer, the time of day, or the weather to affect name mangling. What's more likely to cause deviations is differences in compiler version. But many linux platforms define an ABI (application binary interface) for C++ which includes, among other things, the name mangling rules. On these platforms the same source code ...


8

You have to declare the functions as extern "C" if you don't want their names to be mangled.


7

To see if the function exists, you use dumpbin /exports kernel32.dll | findstr CreateProcess You didn't even use the right prototype, so of course the linker can't find the correct function. The naming convention is completely off, and CreateProcess is really a macro (that expands to either CreateProcessA or W depending on UNICODE). (You don't need to ...


7

This problem occurs I think because a __stdcall function (for 32-bit builds) is normally decorated with a underscore prefix and an @count postfix. But if the function is also marked as __declspec(dllexport) additional decorations are added (__imp, I think). You might be able to avoid using a .def file with the following pragma, if you're willing to live ...


7

From experience, be careful if you use __stdcall in your function signature. With __stdcall, the name will remain mangled to some extent (you will find out quickly enough). Apparently there are two levels of mangling, one the extern "C" deals with at the c++ level but it does not deal with another level of name mangling caused by __stdcall. The extra ...


7

If you don't want to see the warning you either have to disable it or use a newer compiler. The warning is about debug information being limited to 255 characters for the type name. As long as these 255 characters are not identical for two different types, you are ok. And if they are identical, you cannot do much about it anyway! Just turn it off until you ...


6

It sounds like you're trying to use MinGW to compile a program that uses external C functions from a third-party dll. There's a way to export those external functions into a proper import library that MinGW's gnu ld linker can use but it involves creating a .def definition file. The advantage with this is once you create a proper import library you won't ...


6

It isn't specified by the standard, and has certainly changed between versions of the same compiler in my experience, though it has to be deterministic over some fixed set of circumstances, because otherwise there would be no way to link two separately compiled modules. If you're using GetProcAddress, it would be far cleaner to export the functions as ...


6

The only way to get truly undecorated names with __declspec(dllexport) is to export them with the __cdecl calling convention. CALLBACK becomes __stdcall, which decorates the "C" form of the name with a leading _ and trailing @bytes. Otherwise you can use a .DEF file, which is a pain. Another MSVC specific way is to embed a /EXPORT directive into the object ...


5

You need to export the called function so MSI can call it using undecorated C style name Replace your code with this extern "C" _declspec(dllexport) UINT __stdcall MyCustomAction(MSIHANDLE hInstall); extern "C" UINT __stdcall MyCustomAction(MSIHANDLE hInstall) { DWORD dwSize=0; MsiGetProperty(hInstaller, TEXT("MyProperty"), ...


5

Finally managed to get to the bottom of this - it was caused by a .lib that didn't get checked-in to match the DLL from source control - maybe built with a different compiler version. Sorry for any wasted time. ... if all else fails, try rebuilding your library dependencies.


5

_grstartenroll@4 is the decorated function name in the dll. That looks like standard calling convention naming, you could try: [DllImport("grfinger.dll",EntryPoint="_grstartenroll@4", CallingConvention=CallingConvention.StdCall] public static extern int startenroll(int context); Otherwise I would try and get the undecorated function name, you can pipe ...


5

The biggest problem to consider when using a DLL compiled with a different C++ compiler than the calling EXE is memory allocation and object lifetime. I'm assuming that you can get past the name mangling (and calling convention), which isn't difficult if you use a compiler with compatible mangling (I think VC6 is broadly compatible with VS2008), or if you ...


5

Even without the mangling, the 32-bit and 64-bit builds name exports differently, even with extern "C". Check it out with DEPENDS.EXE. This can mean BIG trouble to any client that does a LoadLibrary+GetProcAdress to access your function. So, on top of all the others use a Module Definition File as follows: LIBRARY MYDLL EXPORTS myFunction=myFunction ...


5

You can use a .def file. It will let you export the functions without the decorations. Read: Exporting from a DLL Using DEF Files


5

Sorry for replying to an old thread, but what has been marked as the answer did not work for me. As a number of people have pointed out, the extern "C" decoration is important. Changing the "Project / Properties / Linker / Debugging / Generate debug info" setting made absolutely no difference to the mangled names being generated for me in either Debug or ...


4

Is it COM Dll? If it is a COM Dll, then register it, use OLE view to know the Interafaces and parameters.


4

extern "C" is how you remove decoration - it should work to use: extern "C" declspec(dllimport) char MyNewVariable; or if you want a header that can be used by C++ or C (with /TC switch) #ifdef __cplusplus extern "C" { #endif declspec(dllimport) char MyNewVariable; #ifdef __cplusplus } #endif And of course, link with the import library generated by the ...


4

you must link against the lib generated after compiling the DLL. In the linker options of the project, you must add the .lib file. And yes, you should also declare the variable as: extern "C" { declspec(dllimport) char MyNewVariable; }


4

Just use -Wl,--kill-at on the gcc command line, which will pass --kill-at to the linker. References: http://sourceware.org/binutils/docs/ld/Options.html#Options http://www.geocities.com/yongweiwu/stdcall.htm


4

The only way to do this is by disassembling the function and seeing how it uses the registers and stack. IDA Pro is the best tool to do this, but it's not something that is trivial.


4

__stdcall decorates the function name by adding an underscore to the start, and the number of bytes of parameters to the end (separated by @). So, a function: void __stdcall Foo(int a, int b); ...would become _Foo@8. If you list the function name (undecorated) in the EXPORTS section of your .DEF file, it is exported undecorated. Perhaps this is the ...


4

I did a fairly in-depth answer here, ReactOS is your best bet as it seems again, everybody here is a bit off base. I would strongly discourage attempting to disassemble system DLL's. A MUCH more adventagious (and I do not believe discussed so far from the looks of things), technique is to enumerate the contents of PDB's. PDB files are debug symbols as you ...



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