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1199

Expanding a bit on Harley's answer... When the Python interpreter reads a source file, it executes all of the code found in it. Before executing the code, it will define a few special variables. For example, if the python interpreter is running that module (the source file) as the main program, it sets the special __name__ variable to have a value ...


1090

There is actually a (subtle) difference between the two. Imagine you have the following code in File1.cs: // File1.cs using System; namespace Outer.Inner { class Foo { static void Bar() { double d = Math.PI; } } } Now imagine that someone adds another file (File2.cs) to the project that looks like this: // ...


688

I use the approach found on the Enterprise jQuery site, here Here is their example showing how to declare private & public properties and functions. Everything is done as a self-executing anonymous function. (function( skillet, $, undefined ) { //Private Property var isHot = true; //Public Property skillet.ingredient = "Bacon ...


621

This is not related to performance at all. But consider this: You are using two libraries called Foo and Bar: using namespace foo; using namespace bar; Everything works fine, you can call Blah() from Foo and Quux() from Bar without problems. But one day you upgrade to a new version of Foo 2.0, which now offers a function called Quux(). Now you've got a ...


443

I like this: var yourNamespace = { foo: function() { }, bar: function() { } }; ... yourNamespace.foo();


439

I agree with everything Greg wrote, but I'd like to add: It can even get worse than Greg said! Library Foo 2.0 could introduce a function Quux() that is an unambiguously better match for some of your calls to Quux() than the bar::Quux() your code called for years. Then your code still compiles, but silently calls the wrong function and does god-knows-what. ...


364

When your script is run by passing it as a command to the Python interpreter, python myscript.py all of the code that is at indentation level 0 gets executed. Functions and classes that are defined are, well, defined, but none of their code gets ran. Unlike other languages, there's no main() function that gets run automatically - the main() function is ...


312

Linked to, but not explicitly mentioned here, is exactly when __all__ is used. It is a list of strings defining what symbols in a module will be exported when from <module> import * is used on the module. For example, the following code in a foo.py explicitly exports the symbols bar and baz: __all__ = ['bar', 'baz'] waz = 5 bar = 10 def baz(): ...


274

Another way to do it, which I consider it to be a little bit less restrictive than the object literal form, is this: var ns = new function() { var internalFunction = function() { }; this.publicFunction = function() { }; }; The above is pretty much like the module pattern and whether you like it or not, it allows you to expose all your ...


215

The simplest explanation for the __name__ variable (imho) is the following: Create the following files. # a.py import b and # b.py print "Hello World from %s!" % __name__ if __name__ == '__main__': print "Hello World again from %s!" % __name__ Running them will get you this output: $ python a.py Hello World from b! As you can see, when a ...


194

typeof(T).Name // class name, no namespace typeof(T).FullName // namespace and class name typeof(T).Namespace // namespace, no class name


191

The C++ Standard reads in section 7.3.1.1 Unnamed namespaces, paragraph 2: The use of the static keyword is deprecated when declaring objects in a namespace scope, the unnamed-namespace provides a superior alternative. Static only applies to names of objects, functions, and anonymous unions, not to type declarations. Edit: The decision to ...


181

I think it's bad to put it in the header files of your classes: because then you would be forcing anyone who wants to use your classes (by including your header files) to also be 'using' (i.e. seeing everything in) those other namespaces. However, you may feel free to put a using statement in your (private) *.cpp files.


171

I have seen this behaviour when an application is set to target the .Net 4 Client Profile framework, and the project it references targets the full .Net 4 framework. So to make that clearer: Project A targets the Client Profile framework Project A references Project B Project B targets the full framework The solution in this case is to either upgrade ...


170

Following code prints names of classes in specified ns defined in current assembly. As other guys pointed, namespace can be scattered between different modules, so you need to get a list of assemblies first. string @namespace = "..."; var q = from t in Assembly.GetExecutingAssembly().GetTypes() where t.IsClass && t.Namespace == @namespace ...


157

The ScriptIgnoreAttribute class is in the System.Web.Extensions.dll assembly (Located under Assemblies > Framework in the VS Reference Manager). You have to add a reference to that assembly in your class library project. You can find this information at top of the MSDN page for the ScriptIgnoreAttribute class.


130

Namespacing does for functions and classes what scope does for variables. It allows you to use the same function or class name in different parts of the same program without causing a name collision. In simple terms, think of a namespace as a person's surname. If there are two people named "John" you can use their surnames to tell them apart. The ...


129

Inline namespaces are a library versioning feature akin to symbol versioning, but implemented purely at the C++11 level (ie. cross-platform) instead of being a feature of a specific binary executable format (ie. platform-specific). It is a mechanism by which a library author can make a nested namespace look and act as if all its declarations were in the ...


125

it's a list of public objects of that module -- it overrides the default of hiding everything that begins with an underscore


123

Putting it inside the namespaces makes the declarations local to that namespace for the file (in case you have multiple namespaces in the file) but if you only have one namespace per file then it doesn't make a difference whether they go outside or inside the namespace. using ThisNamespace.IsImported.InAllNamespaces.Here; namespace Namespace1 { using ...


117

I'm ready to declare this a bug in VS2010, this has bitten way too many programmers already. The fix is easy: Project + Properties, Application tab, change Target Framework to ".NET Framework 4" instead of the Client Profile that is selected by default. System.Web is not included in the client profile. Having this option in the first place is quite silly, ...


110

By default, use namespaced functions. Classes are to build objects, not to replace namespaces. In Object Oriented code Scott Meyers wrote a whole Item for his Effective C++ book on this topic, "Prefer non-member non-friend functions to member functions". I found an online reference to this principle in an article from Herb Sutter: ...


106

Namespaces are packages essentially. They can be used like this: namespace MyNamespace { class MyClass { }; } Then in code: MyNamespace::MyClass* pClass = new MyNamespace::MyClass(); Hope that helps. Or, if you want to always use a specific namespace, you can do this: using namespace MyNamespace; MyClass* pClass = new MyClass(); Edit: ...


106

I recently ran into a complaint about VS 2010. It turned out that pretty much all the source files had these two lines: using namespace std; using namespace boost; A lot of Boost features are going into the C++0x standard, and VS2010 has a lot of C++0x features, so suddenly these programs were not compiling. Therefore, avoiding using namespace X; is a ...


100

I got it. Turns out that it requires \\ to escape the colon. $.get(xmlPath, {}, function(xml) { $("rs\\:data", xml).find("z\\:row").each(function(i) { alert("found zrow"); }); }, "xml"); As Rich pointed out: The better solution does not require escaping and works on all "modern" browsers: .find("[nodeName=z:row]")


94

Is there a more elegant or succinct way of doing this? Yes. For example: var your_namespace = your_namespace || {}; then you can have var your_namespace = your_namespace || {}; your_namespace.Foo = {toAlert:'test'}; your_namespace.Bar = function(arg) { alert(arg); }; with(your_namespace) { Bar(Foo.toAlert); }


91

Overview Certainly you can, in fact clojure.core namespace itself is split up this way and provides a good model which you can follow by looking in src/clj/clojure: core.clj core_deftype.clj core_print.clj core_proxy.clj ..etc.. All these files participate to build up the single clojure.core namespace. Primary File One of these is the primary file, ...


89

A little-appreciated fact is that there is no such thing as a "namespace" from the point of view of the underlying CLR type system. Rather, it's just a convention that we say that a type that contains periods in its name is "a member of a namespace". Logically there is no difference at all between the legal code: namespace N { class C {} } and the ...


87

A namespace alias is a convenient way of referring to a long namespace name by a different, shorter name. As an example, say you wanted to use the numeric vectors from Boost's uBLAS without a using namespace directive. Stating the full namespace every time is cumbersome: boost::numeric::ublas::vector<double> v; Instead, you can define an alias for ...


86

I'm attempting to answer the primary question here with as thorough an explanation as I can. Developing and Testing Your Code Say you're writing a Python script designed to be used as a module: def do_important(): '''This function does something very important''' You could test the module by adding this call of the function to the bottom: ...



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