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5

When you include a C++ header for a C library facility, that is, a header <cfoo> corresponding to a C header <foo.h>, then the names from the C library are declared in namespace std. However, additionally it is unspecified whether the names are also declared in the global namespace. In your case it seems that they are. But you cannot rely on ...


4

As usual in C++, thing's are less simple than you might think. There are three ways to call member functions. just call the function: foo(); call with this: this->foo(); use the class's name: classname::f(); Numbers #1 and #2 are equivalent, some people prefer #2 because it's clearer that this is a member function and not a global function (these ...


4

C++ standard library includes most of the C library (there are some hazy details around optional parts of the C library). Since C has no concept of namespacing, everything included from the C library will be in the global namespace. Since <math.h> is a C header, its functions are put into global namespace. Everything included from the C++ standard ...


4

Based on what you've shown us, you only need a forward declaration of SomeClass in SomeNamespace.h, not a full include: #ifndef SOME_NAMESPACE_H #define SOME_NAMESPACE_H // #include "SomeClass.h" // << don't do this. class SomeClass; namespace SomeNamespace { namespace AnotherNamespace { void SomeFunction( SomeClass *pSomeClass ); ...


4

If the code compiles, then yes, ::myFunction() is referencing the global declaration of myFunction. This is most commonly used when a local definition shadows your global definition: namespace local { int myFunction() {}; // local namespace definition }; int myFunction() {}; // global definition. using namespace local; int main() { // myFunction()...


3

In the templated case, when compiling f2, the compiler considers using Foo::operator* but not Bar::operator*, while in the non-templated case, it considers using both (and refuses to go further because of the ambiguity). What makes the compiler behave differently ? In both cases the compiler considers using both, but in the case of a templated operator*, ...


3

Let's suppose that Alice is using two libraries, made by Bob and Charlie. // This file is written by Alice: #include <bob.hpp> #include <charlie.hpp> int main(void) { using namespace bob; using namespace charlie; // Do a bunch of stuff } Now, Charlie invents a new feature called foobar which he adds to his library. foobar is great and ...


3

Almost there. var Model = Model || {}; Model.Polygon = class { constructor(height, width) { this.height = height || 0; this.width = width || 0; } } var myNewPolygon = new Model.Polygon(10, 50); Classes can be unnamed (aka "anonymous") just like a function, and just like a function, unnamed classes can be assigned to variables, as ...


3

Disclaimer: This solution can only modify global variables, so it's not perfect. See Is it good practice to use import __main__? for pros and cons. In foo.py: import __main__ def set_a_to_three(): __main__.a = 3 __main__ is a name given to the current top-level program. For example, if you import foo from a module bar, then bar can be referenced ...


3

An answer was generously provided by @omz in a Slack team: import inspect def set_a_to_three(): f = inspect.currentframe().f_back f.f_globals['a'] = 3 This provides the advantage over the __main__ solution that it works in multiple levels of imports, for example if a imports b which imports my module, foo, foo can modify b's globals, not just a's (...


3

To let the module access your script's namespace, you will have to pass the namespace to the function. For example: >>> import foo >>> foo.set_a_to_three(globals(), locals()) >>> a 3 The inside of the code would look like this: def set_a_to_three(globalDict, localDict): localDict['a'] = 3 Sidenote: In this case, the ...


3

Well, you do make another assignment to b: b = b / 2 and since operations on int (immutable) types will always return a new object there's no changes made to the original value whatever the operation may be. This differs for mutable types which can change in certain operations, namely augmented assignment operations were the changes are made in-place: &...


3

Usually? They are the same. But depending on the context, they might mean different things. For example, consider the following extreme example (don't do this in a real project!): void f() { std::cout << "f" << std::endl; } class Cl { public: void f() { std::cout << "Cl::f" << std::endl; } void g() { struct Cl { ...


3

The relevant part of the error message is this: Error … : namespace ‘pbkrtest’ 0.4-2 is being loaded, but >= 0.4.4 is required — Your package (indirectly) depends on another package called ‘pbkrtest’. This package is installed but apparently outdated. You need to reinstall it using install.packages('pbkrtest'). The additional warning message gives ...


3

Yes, it means the variable, type or function following it must be available in the global namespace. It can be used for example when something is shadowed by a local definition: struct S { int i; }; void f() { struct S { double d; }; S a; ::S b; static_assert(sizeof(a) != sizeof(b), "should be different types"); }


2

The usual convention is to as far as I know is to declare the anonymous namespace at the start of the .cpp files. In your case your cpp file should look like this. namespace{ RNG rando = new RNG(); } void Foo::SomeFunc(){ //implementation } void Foo::SomeOtherFunc(int){ //implementation } This way the functions should have access to rando.


2

Move the unnamed namespace out of the other namespace: namespace{ RNG rando = new RNG(); } void Foo::SomeFunc(){ //implementation } void Foo::SomeOtherFunc(int){ //implementation } It can't be accessed outside the translation unit anyways.


2

You can use global alias: global::Division.TheirApplication.TheirOtherStuff see https://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/c3ay4x3d.aspx


2

Ignore that the classes have the "same name". Because they don't. One class is called Core\Page, the other is called Addons\Page. Those are their names, their fully qualified names to be exact. It's as much a difference as Foo and Bar. If you tell PHP to instantiate Core\Page, then it's going to do that; you can't "trick" it into instantiating Addons\Page, ...


2

If you really want to do this, define a struct with a static element in a header file: MyQueue.h: struct MyQueue { static std::queue<int> q; } You will also have to define the variable in a corresponding .cpp file. MyQueue.cpp: #inclue "MyQueue.h" static std::queue<int> MyQueue::q; You can access it by any file including that header, ...


2

It's easy to set in the __main__, because we know it's name. #foo.py import sys def set_a_to_three(): sys.modules['__main__'].a = 3


2

i have Fixed issues select Tools Menu select NuGet package Manger console and select package manger console and install Install-Package Microsoft.WindowsAzure.ConfigurationManager after fixed issues


2

You need reference to the Microsoft.Azure. Follow below steps to add reference. In Solution Explorer, right click on project and click add reference. In the Add Reference dialog box, select the tab indicating the type of component you want to reference. Select the Microsoft.Azure and then click OK. EDIT : Also as per J Steen's comment you can add it ...


2

after b =b/2, b is new object >>> a = 42 >>> id(a) 8006428 >>> b = a >>> id(b) 8006428 >>> b = b/2 >>> id(b) 8006680


2

Any decent C++ book should cover namespaces and code separation. Try something like this: myfile.h #ifndef myfile_H #define myfile_H namespace myns { class myclass { public: void doSomething(); }; } #endif myfile.cpp: #include "myfile.h" void myns::myclass::doSomething() { //... } And then you can use it like this: #...


2

You should not be using namespaces and modules at the same time, even if you were not using webpack you would have the same problem a normal approach with modules is to just export the class directly: // src/App/Core/Http/Test.ts export class Test { public attr:any; } // src/App/Bootstrap.ts import { Test } from "./Core/Http/Test"; let testInstance = ...


2

[EDIT: Remove stuff about unnamed namespaces begin unique to TUs now the code in the question has been clarified.] In C++ we tend to think of a class as being a wrapper for some data which maintains an invariant (as opposed to a struct, which tends to be used for a bunch of data with no invariant). The constructor establishes the invariant, the destructor ...


1

1) That XML isn't valid. 2) If you want to avoid XML NAMESPACES then you could use following syntax for every XML element: *:XmlElement. Example: declare @xml xml = N'<DiscoverResponse xmlns="urn:schemas-microsoft-com:xml-analysis"> <return> <root xmlns="urn:schemas-microsoft-com:xml-analysis:rowset"> <row&...


1

Let's get a namespace and a namespace variable: % namespace eval example {variable result 0} Use the variable command to declare the name result to be a namespace variable within the lambda: % apply {x {variable result ; set result [expr {$x * 100}]}} 3 % set ::example::result # => 0 % set ::result # => 300 The lambda used the global namespace ...


1

Putting a backslash in front of a class will refer to the global namespace. Try: public function sendInfo(\Order $order){...}



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