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13

When you use #The code in question module Api module V1 class UserController < ApplicationController end end end ApplicationControllerdefinition will be searched in Api::V1 then if not found in Api then if not found in the root namespace. I agree it could be confusing, that's why I tend to use absolute paths like so: ...


5

There isn't, but in PHP 7 you'll be able to use FooLibrary\Bar\Baz\{ ClassA, ClassB, ClassC, ClassD as Fizbo }; As the following RFC has passed: https://wiki.php.net/rfc/group_use_declarations EDIT: Note that too many uses in a class may be a sign of "smell". Isn't that particular class doing too much? Shouldn't you be creating new "base" classes and ...


5

I can reproduce the exact error, line numbers, positions and all, with #include <cstdlib> #define rand Utility::rand #include <algorithm> which produces In file included from /usr/local/gcc-4.6.4/lib/gcc/x86_64-unknown-linux-gnu/4.6.4/../../../../include/c++/4.6.4/algorithm:63:0, from prog.cc:3: ...


4

From [basic.scope.declarative], the definition of a "declarative region" is: Every name is introduced in some portion of program text called a declarative region, which is the largest part of the program in which that name is valid, that is, in which that name may be used as an unqualified name to refer to the same entity. The restriction is, ...


4

The deepest nested scope is searched first, and scopes are then searched outward if the name is not found. So first it would find a block-scope declaration of F inside G, if any; then it would find a declaration at the namespace scope of A, if any; and if that too failed it would search the global scope. Since using A::B::F; appears at global scope, A::F is ...


4

However, I was wondering whether or not this is standard behaviour. Yes provided you are using a C++11 compliant compiler and by standard you are referring to the C++11 standard. but not by simply doing INFO or WARNING. This is because the enum is within the namespace scope. Have you tried LogLevelEnum ::INFO or LogLevelEnum ::WARNING? Nice ...


4

I would go for a fourth option, preferring a collections.namedtuple: Animal = namedtuple('Animal', 'number_of_legs favourite_food') You then create instances like: DOG = Animal(4, ['Socks', 'Meat']) CAT = Animal(4, ['Lasagna', 'Fish']) and access the values externally as: from animals import CAT print CAT.number_of_legs There's really no point ...


4

The name CreateWindow already exists in the Windows API. Unfortunately, your namespacing (nice try!) has no effect as the original symbol is a macro. There is no good workaround for this as long as you include windows.h. You will have to choose a different name for your function.


4

I mean, is there any way to look up names in the next surrounding declarative region, i.e. the containing bar namespace? No. You can sort of do it the other way around: void foo() { using bar::foo; foo(*this); /// OK now }


4

I think Java/C# have a different philosopyh than C++. Let me explain. When you import something in Java you are only importing it in this part of the code. Let's say you have a class A in package packageA. Furthermore, A imports a class B in package packageB and B imports java.util.LinkedList. In C++, A would include a header-file to use B and in this ...


3

As already pointed out by others, the problem of namespace pollution is not as prominent in Java as it is in C++. The main reason why namespace pollution is a problem in C++ (and thus called "pollution" in the first place) is that it may cause errors in other modules. This is explained in more detail in Why is “using namespace std;” considered bad practice?. ...


3

The reason that (eval `(set! ,name 10)) doesn't work, is that the names of local variables aren't present at runtime. Local variables are stored at the stack, so references and assignment to local variables are compiled to "get the value in the i'th variable (counted from the top of the stack)" and "store this value in the i'th slot at the stack". Module ...


3

I'm not going to comment too much if you should overload the * operator like this. All I'm going to say is that it will confuse a lot of people. You can bring in just the operator instead of the whole namespace. using Foo::operator*; double result = l * r; For custom classes you can use ADL (Argument Dependent Lookup), like below: namespace Foo { ...


3

In Ruby, both modules and classes can be used to provide namespace separation. In fact Class is a subclass of Module, and most things you can do with a Module you can also do with a Class If Foo needs to be a class, declare it as a class, don't declare it as a module. E.g. lib/foo.rb require 'foo/bar.rb' class Foo def bar Foo::Bar.new end ...


3

There's no one-size-fits-all answer, it really depends on how many constants you have to handle, how you use them, if having polymorphism dispatch makes sense or not and the phase of the moon. Now in your example, since you have two or more sets of constants with a similar structure and meaning, I'd go for the "classes as namespaces" solution. FWIW ...


3

The xmlns is not an attribute. It is a namespace declaration. In your case, it is the default namespace. It means the searchBookResponse element, and all nodes below it, belong to that namespace, and such elements are different to elements with the same name that are in different namespaces, or no namespace at all. To solve your problem, you need to declare ...


3

Here is a simple example: foo.py: import numpy as np def foo(x): """Return 2D square array of zeros.""" return np.zeros((x, x)) del np bar.py: import numpy as np def bar(): """Return 3x3 square array.""" return np.arange(9).reshape(3, 3) main.py: from bar import bar from foo import foo print bar() print foo(3) And here are the ...


2

EOF is a preprocessor macro defined in <cstdio> (and in the C header <stdio.h> which is also usable from C++). Preprocessor macros do text substitution on source code, before that code is actually compiled. As such, preprocessor macros are not names that can appear in any namespace. This is different from function names declared in headers ...


2

In C, EOF was defined as a macro, using #define. It could possibly have been defined as const, except that it predates const. For compatibility, this means it's also defined as a macro in C++. Something like: #define EOF -1 If you know how #define works, you should see why ::EOF and std::EOF produce compiler errors. #define'd macros are simple textual ...


2

Assuming you have the default Artisan alias set in your config/app.php, you're right that you just need to import the correct namespace. Either add this top of the file: use Artisan; Or use a fully qualified namespace in your code: $migrate = \Artisan::call('migrate'); If you don't have the alias set for whatever reason, use use ...


2

If you want to remove the <searchBookResponse xmlns="urn:example.com"> wrapper and add the books contained within to the rest of the books, you must also remove the namespace from those books. Otherwise you will end up with two kinds of books: <book> and <book xmlns="urn:example.com">. These two are not the same thing. XSLT 1.0 ...


2

You're calling the method swap() and permute() from a static context, but handle them as if they were non-static. Try changing it to the following: public static function permute($str,$i,$n) { if ($i == $n) return "$str\n"; else { for ($j = $i; $j < $n; $j++) { self::swap($str,$i,$j); self::permute($str, ...


2

The closest equivalent to the namespace directive found in other languages is the Implicit Namespace Packages facility described in PEP 420 and introduced in Python 3.3. It allows for modules in multiple locations to be combined into a single, unified namespace rather than forcing the import of the first valid candidate found in sys.path. There is no direct ...


2

There isn't really an analogue. Consider this simple header: // a.h namespace ns { struct A { .. }; struct B { .. }; } If we were to do this: #include "a.h" using ns::A; The point of that code is to be able to write A unqualified (as opposed to having to write ns::A). Now, you might consider a python equivalent as: from a import A But ...


2

the solution in the comments was to be more specific about the export like below #' Label wrapper for ggplot #' #' Include in the facet_grid option of ggplot. #' @param variable #' @param value #' @return wrapper #' @export plot.label.wrap plot.label.wrap <- function(variable, value) { lapply(strwrap(as.character(value), width=15, simplify=FALSE), ...


2

C++ doesn't allow binding of temporaries (rvalues) to non-const lvalue references, which is what you're doing here: return output(DateTime()); You can fix this by making the parameter a const reference: const string output(const DateTime& time) const;


2

In VB, you don't need to specify a namespace in each file - it will take on the root namespace of the project. These root namespaces have the same name (by default) as the project they're in, so your root namespace will be LibProj already. By adding the Namespace statement in your code, you're adding a sub-namespace to the root namespace. If you want to ...


2

No you cannot load all classes in a namespace. A namespace is literally just an addition to the class/function naming system, it has no intrinsic connection to files or such. Since classes are "loaded" by including their file, and since namespaces are not linked to files, there could be any number of files in any number of places in your filesystem which ...


2

The bracketed namespace is the recommended method for defining multiple namespaces in a single file. If you only have one namespace in a file then use the non-bracketed version. PSR-1 recommends one class per file, so you should probably limit yourself to one namespace per file, too.


2

Form Namespace and Class Names PSR-1 standrad: Namespaces and classes MUST follow an "autoloading" PSR: [PSR-0, PSR-4]. This means each class is in a file by itself, and is in a namespace of at least one level: a top-level vendor name. Code written for PHP 5.3 and after MUST use formal namespaces : Example : namespace Vendor\Model; class ...



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