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1

Integer overflow exception on idiv instruction occurs when result of n-bit division can not fit into n-bit register. That is possible because idiv and div divide the whole register pair EDX:EAX. Your EDX value is 1 and you divide EDX:EAX by 2, which results into a bit shift to right. This shift moves 1 on EAX┬┤s MSB, and you have a positive result 0x80000000 ...


0

i have changed my NASM code a little bit now it looks like below, section .mytext progbits alloc exec write align=16 ; CHANGED HERE global _start: _start: jmp short GotoCall shellcode: pop esi xor eax, eax mov byte [esi + 7], al lea ebx, [esi] mov long [esi + 8], ebx mov long [esi + 12], eax ...


0

I think you have to create .img file using partcopy or etc. I mean you have done to create an Image File but that has to be right one.As a sample you can produce it by using copy /b but that doesn't make it right.Or you can make it ISO file to make it usable. miso your.iso -ab your.img


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I made a small investigation and it turns out MinGW gcc produces COFF-compliant object files. As to nasm - there is a command line - -f coff that you can use to force it produce COFF-format object file. Next it's quite restricted in form of defining procedures. In your assembly listing don't forget to specify SEGMENT _text before coding your actual function. ...


0

You only want a single digit returned by the user so you should ignore everything else in the buffer. With the buffer given in your example you can do the following: and dword[num],0FFh sub dword[num],30h After this num will contain numeric value entered by the user. In case user entered a character, control code or anything non-numeric num will be higher ...


0

You should take a look at the MikeOS bootloader. You can find it here: http://github.com/mig-hub/mikeOS/blob/master/source/bootload/bootload.asm You'll just have to change the kernel name in the data section: kern_filename db "KERNEL BIN" To: kern_filename db "STAGE2 BIN" Don't forget that FAT12 has file names in the 8.3 format!


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%include "io.inc" %defstr myname ABC %strlen length myname %substr text "This is String" 3,2 %strcat names 'Assembly' , '.Language' section .text global CMAIN CMAIN: PRINT_STRING myname NEWLINE PRINT_DEC 2,length NEWLINE PRINT_STRING text NEWLINE PRINT_STRING names ;write your code here xor eax, eax ret


0

To call the _myfunc entry point from Cython, you need to declare it: cdef extern: void _myfunc() After that declaration, you may call _myfunc() in your Cython module as if it were a Python function. Of course, you will need to link myfunc.obj into your .pyd as explained in the answer to your other question.


1

Three central errors: 1) "buffer" is too small & pointer is missing. Change segment .bss buffer resb 4 to segment .bss buffer resb 10 pointer resd 1 2) "copying" is wrong. Change pop eax ; printing the string converted pop edx ; copying the string to array mov ...


2

64-bit system calls on OSX need to have a class specifier in bits 24..31 of the register that holds the system call number (rax in your case). You've implicitly used the class specifier 0, which is invalid. You probably want the UNIX/BSD class, which means that you should be adding 2<<24 (0x2000000). So these lines: mov rax, 4 mov rax, 1 ...


0

mov rsi, qword msg This was wrong: By adding "qword" you tell the assembler to load the 64-bit word located at address "msg" into RSI instead of the address of "msg" itself. Maybe the following instruction works: lea rsi, msg However I fear the problem is somewhere else: You have to find out why the relocation is a "32 bit absolute ...


0

There are a couple of problems with your code: mov ecx, sayi inc ecx mov [sayi], ecx The first line will copy the address of sayi into ecx, not the value at sayi. To get the value you would write mov ecx,[sayi]. Another issue is that you've only reserved a single byte of space at sayi , but you're trying to access it as if it was a dword (4 bytes). To ...


0

Bits 16 org 0x7c00 start: xor ax,ax mov ah,0x0E mov al,'A' int 10h mov al,10h int 16h int 19h hlt times 510-($-$$) db 0 dw 0xAA55 Try This Code.If It Doesn't Work,make me know.


0

INT 13h AH=08h: Read Drive Parameters Parameters: Registers AH 08h = function number for read_drive_parameters DL drive index (e.g. 1st HDD = 80h) ES:DI[4] set to 0000h:0000h to work around some buggy BIOS Results: CF Set On Error, Clear If No Error AH Return Code DL number of hard disk drives DH[4] logical last index of heads = number_of - 1 ...


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You Can Use This Code: mov si,msg_text call print_colored print_colored: .loop: lodsb cmp al,0 je .done inc bl mov ah,0x0E Int 0x10 jmp .loop .done: ret It makes your String colored but not for your choice.


0

I think you can't use boot hook interrupt (int 0x18) like this.And I think that is not your own code.If you want use clear bootloader,You have to use binary files (which is using in other operating systems).If you want to make your own bootloader,you have to waste a lot of time for coding and compiling and placing.


0

When using a C compiler the standard libraries are typically linked to the code which is typically not done when calling the linker separately. The three functions are located in "kernel32.dll" so you'll have to link against "kernel32.lib" (or "libkernel32.a" when using GNU tools). Your entry point is "_main" so I assume you want to use the startup object ...


0

My selfmade alignment using the "org" directive: START: org START + ((($-START)/8)*8)+8 org START + ((($-START)/32)*32)+32 org START + ((($-START)/128)*128)+128


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For the other formats where align is supported, the linked documentation page lists the defaults. For the bin format it doesn't, but a quick check (that you could have easily performed too) shows it's 4.


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One way is to store lower 8 bits of ecx like that: (guess it should work) movzx edx, cl imul edx, [eax+edx], 2 The other way is to run a block of self-modifying code replacing 'cl' with an 'immediate' offset updated by the app when needed. Note that modifying the code being run creates additional delays in newer CPUs, so it's rarely practical.


0

While I was trying to figure out how to use GDB to debug it a friend who was looking at my code figured out the problem. mov eax, [ecx] mov ebx, [edx] The problem here was that I was dereferencing registers that held actual data and not memory addresses to data, by simply removing the brackets the problem was resolved. ...


3

You can see the binary representation of the floating number 1.0 with the following lines of code: #include <stdio.h> int main(void) { float a = 1.0; printf("in hex, this is %08x\n", *((int*)(&a))); printf("the int representation is %d\n", *((int*)(&a))); return 0; } This results in in hex, this is 3f800000 the int representation ...


3

The float is represented in binary32 format. The positive floats go from 0.0f (whose bits when interpreted as integer represent 0) to +inf (whose bits interpreted as integer represent approximately 2000000000). The number 1.0f is almost exactly halfway between these two extremes. There are approximately as many positive float numbers below it (10-1, 10-2, ...


15

Because 1065353216 is the unsigned 32-bit integer representation of the 32-bit floating point value 1.0. More specifically, 1.0 as a 32-bit float becomes: 0....... ........ ........ ........ sign bit (zero is positive) .0111111 1....... ........ ........ exponent (127, which means zero) ........ .0000000 00000000 00000000 mantissa (zero, no correction ...


1

Your function should look like this, _myFunc: push ebp ; setup ebp as frame pointer mov ebp, esp mov eax, [ebp + 8] leave ; mov esp,ebp / pop ebp ret The convention is to use ebp to access the parameters, to do so you need to save ebp on the stack and make it to point to the ...


1

You need to setup to access the the parameters first by saving esp. This is explained in: http://www.nasm.us/doc/nasmdoc9.html in section "9.1.2 Function Definitions and Function Calls" The following works for me assembly.s section .text global myFunc:function myFunc: push ebp mov ebp, esp mov eax, [ebp+8] mov esp, ebp pop ...


1

you refer to argument on stack, by reading from [EBP+offset] - has EBP been set up to actually point at stack? If no, you may have to do that first, conventionally done by: push ebp mov ebp,esp Only then points EBP to its stacked previous contents, below stacked return address, and below passed arguments.


0

lea edi, [text] Well. There I go


3

; is bound to asm-comment in assembly mode. You can either do a quoted insert with C-q ; on a case-by-case basis, or remove the binding and just use M-; (comment-dwim) for fancier commenting. If you want to do the latter, set ";" locally to do a self-insert command: (defun my-hook () (local-set-key ";" 'self-insert-command)) (add-hook 'asm-mode-hook ...


0

Double precision values are usually stored in 8-bytes cells. In your loop youe are assuming a 4-bytes cell, that's why only half of array is swapped.


2

You are dealing with doubles, but you are only multiplying ecx by 4 (the size of a float). Since the size of a double is 8, you should multiply by 8. Another problem is that you do not decrement ecx before you multiply by it. Assuming n is passed as 3, you will be swapping dx[3] with dy[3] on the first iteration, but that is beyond the ends of the arrays. ...


0

You want to look at "stack frames", and in case you're using x86, look at what the micro-coded instructions "enter" and "leave" do, but don't use them. Instead, use the coded out equivalent, to set up stack frame such that you can access your own passed arguments. Consider that, in C, parameter handling is done such that you can pass many arguments to a ...


1

That's defined by the instruction set (x86), not by NASM. These are the valid forms of XOR (taken from Intel's Software Developer's Manual): Opcode Instruction Op/En 64-Bit Mode Compat/Leg Mode Description 34 ib XOR AL, imm8 I Valid Valid AL XOR imm8. 35 iw XOR AX, imm16 I Valid ...


0

Looks like they're constants. More details... ummm, .rodata.cst16 sort of implies READ-ONLY Constants 16 bytes wide. Often it is easier and quicker to load a register from a memory address than from a literal value. Add to this the fact that these are used in concert with the xmms registers and it makes more sense. Loading the xmms register with one of ...


1

try: lea si, [text] lea loads the address resulting from the addressing mode address calculation. therefore, we express label as address with this. many would probably just mov si, text


0

You are right : NASM does not support ARM. There is a very simple reason : ARM assembly has nothing to do with any x86 assembly. An assembly is linked to the hardware architecture it is made for. Assembly instructions are mnemonics for actual processor instruction set, and ARM instruction set has nothing in common with x86 instruction, because ARM ...


1

You'll need to change the background color when the electron beam is at the first raster line of the cursor line, and change it back when it has reached the last raster line of the cursor line. To do this you need to calculate which raster line corresponds to your chosen cursor line, and know how to ask the video card for the current raster line.


0

Given your comments I assume you have a very basic knowledge of assembly in general, so let's start with some C code. You have already loaded the file somewhere into RAM, so you just have to create the comma-separated list by replacing newlines with commas; in code: void to_list(char *text) { while(*text != '\0') { if(*text == '\n') ...


0

You also should put colon after Main and cls bits 16 org 0x7c00 jmp Main ;In= si = string, ah = 0eh, al = char, Out= character screen Print: lodsb cmp al, 0 je Done mov ah, 0eh int 10h jmp Print Done: ret Main: mov si, msg call Print cls: hlt msg db "Hello World",0 times 510 - ($-$$) db 0 dw ...


0

You use a comment in line 5. To mark a line as comment you need a semicolon. "label or instruction" means, that each line have to be an instruction(an opcode like mov,add,...) or it have to be a label(like Print:) or a label followed by an instruction.


2

In 16-bit mode you have to use BX. E.g. see here: For 16-bit addressing, the offset value can be in one of the three registers: BX, SI, or DI


0

In this code you are getting two characters into dx: mov dx, [inputBuffer+2+di] You should be getting one character: xor dx, dx mov dl, [inputBuffer+2+di] (The clearing of dx first is so that you get a full 16 bit value so that you can easily add it to ax later.) Edit: The same when you are getting the length: xor ax, ax mov al, [inputBuffer+1] mov ...


0

What your program actually does is: Read in four bytes. Take the first and the third byte entered from keyboard. If you enter two one-digit numbers you'll have the two digits (because the second byte is the "return" key) Subtract the ASCII code of '0' from both characters. If the two characters are digits you'll get the decimal value - otherwise you'll get ...


0

I've got an "Arithmetic exception". This is caused by a lack of XOR EDX, EDX before the DIV instruction. DIV divides in this case EDX:EAX by [divisor], so you must handle EDX.



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