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4

write_string expects the address of a string, but new_line is just the character value 0xa. Trying to interpret this as the address of a string will give unpredictable results. If you want a string that just contains a single 0xa that you can print then you'd need to do something like this: section .data message: db 'Displaying 9 stars', new_line ...


1

The function you are showing there is "naked", i.e. it doesn't set up a stack frame. That is something you do manually in assembler, if you need one. Typically it looks something like: function: push ebp mov ebp, esp ... And then you must also manually tear it down before returning, typically mov esp, ebp pop ebp ret n (or I could have used the leave ...


2

This why the nice people at Intel gave us fcomi(p): Performs an unordered comparison of the contents of registers ST(0) and ST(i) and sets the status flags ZF, PF, and CF in the EFLAGS register according to the results The fstsw ax \ sahf method is ancient, and doesn't even work on all "non-ancient" CPUs (some older x64 processors miss sahf). The use ...


1

FPU math should never afect to CPU flags like carry and zero! So copy flags from FPU to CPU flag register after fcomp instruction and than check the carry and zero flags like: fld qword ptr [a] fcomp qword ptr [b] wait ;wait FPU fstsw ax ;copy FPU flags to ax sahf ;copy ax to CPU flags jbe LessOrEqu ;do ...


1

Your assembly program, apart from that odd int 16h* is specifically for Linux (32-bit Linux, to be more precise). int 0x80 is the way you invoke one of the Linux kernel system calls. Windows doesn't do it this way. Instead you call the Windows API or the C standard library. This OS-specific variation is one of the reasons it is good to use a higher ...


0

Are you sure array size represents the number of elements and that it doesn't contain the total length of the array? Then perhaps you could code mov ecx,[ebp+40];ecx saves the srray size shr ecx,2


0

If there are 9 disks then you're doing 1 iteration too many. Use jb instead of jbe cmp ecx, dword 9 jbe Loopdraw Make sure ALL the print_ routines jump back to THIS_LABEL without corrupting EBX or ECX. ... cmp edx, 8 je print8 THIS_LABEL: inc ecx add ebx, 4 ...


0

a. If input had a minus sign then EAX would be wrong. You need xor eax,eax between push eax and l1: b. The clearing of BH is either superfluous or not enough! You choose. c. The write_digit routine misses a RET instruction and EDX must be set equal to 1 in stead of 4 write_digit: ;Print score mov eax, 4 mov ebx, 1 mov ecx, digit mov edx, 4 int 80h ...


1

Well what's in that buffer? add dword [userScore], 6 Adds 6 to the dword at the address userScore (which is of course exactly what it looks like it's doing), so the rest of the code should treat it as a dword also. If there is a string in there, as a suspect there is otherwise you wouldn't be asking this question, then adding an integer to it doesn't ...


1

Those register combinations are forbidden. Use: mov al, dl mov bl, dh You might find it useful to read the documentation.


1

I'm not sure what "enhance" is supposed to mean, but assuming the upper half of rax is zero, it sign-extends eax into rax. First, observe that adding 0x80000000 and then xoring with 0x80000000 would do exactly nothing to eax. They both invert the highest bit, and an even number of inversions cancel out. But it's 64bit, so something happens: the addition ...


1

If you use BIOS, the first 512 bytes sector is loaded to memory by BIOS itself after POST. For CD-ROMs or EFI the rules may be different. (I want to load the kernel at org 2000h) The first 512 bytes are always loaded at address 7C00h, but with different possibilities of segment:offset composition, i.e. 07C0:0000 is possible too and this depends on the ...


0

The problem here is, that number and number2 are not numbers, i.e. immediate literals. Instead they are interpreted as absolute memory addresses and the corresponding instructions, if they would exist would be e.g. mov eax, [0x80000100] ;; vs mov [0x80000104], [eax] ;; Invalid instruction One has to pay attention to the instruction format as ...


0

Labels work as addresses in nasm so your mov number2, [eax] would translate to something like mov 0x12345678, [eax] which is of course invalid because you cannot move data to immediate operand. So you would need mov [number2], [eax] but that's also invalid. You can achieve this using some register to temporarily hold the value [eax]: mov eax, number mov ...


1

Here is a fixed version. Note that groupadd might not be in /bin, and you should probably print an error message if exec fails. ;---------------------------NASM---------------------- section .data ; initialized data, can be var's userg: db "Type in the user group to add: ",10 ; 1st string, 10 is used to drop down a line. userg_L: ...


0

I decided to abandon the I/O scheme from Guide to Assembly Language Programming in Linux and go with that (which works on Cygwin/nasm) of Carter, Paul A. PC assembly language. Raleigh, NC: Lulu Press, 2007(i.e., its driver.c cdecl.h asm_io.inc asm_io.asm files)


0

The org directive doesn't cause the program to be loaded at a specific physical address, it informs the assembler to assume that the program is loaded that far into the code segment. So for example, the value of sect2 is not zero, it's 0x5000. Setting es to 0x500 would make it start at the physical address 05000, but that's not where the program is. You ...


1

Your error was to assemble io.mac. It is a textfile which is included in sample.asm "as is". io.obj is not an assembled io.mac. With assembling io.mac you destroyed the original io.obj. But even if you extract the original io.obj from win_nasm_progs.zip you will fail. It is not a Windows file but a MS-DOS file (yes, this is very annoying). You can't either ...


1

The Linux kernel supports various binary formats. coff is a particularly old one, and if the kernel still supports it at all, it might not be enabled in modern distributions. Try -f elf instead of -f coff.


0

You could try: .lcomm min, 2 or .comm min, 2 to put aside space for two bytes (one word) in the bss section. The point of the bss section is that the loader will allocate space and set the content to zero on load, but it won't take up space in your file on disk. .lcomm is if you only need to refer to min from inside the file where you use .lcomm. ...


1

Reserving one word is pretty easy, it's simply to use: min .word 0 which reserves one word and sets it to zero. If you wanted to reserve a large chunk, say 50 words, many assemblers allow for something like: buff .byte 50(0) but I don't know if gas supports that. It does appear to provide similar functionality with the .fill and .space ...


0

When you declare your code and data segments in gdt.asm, you have the following lines. CODE_SEG equ gdt_code - gdt_start -10;-10 so it is withing memory limits DATA_SEG equ gdt_data - gdt_start -10; I have no idea as to why you would think you need to subtract 10 to stay within memory. This step is not necessary, and you should have this: CODE_SEG equ ...


0

haha I'm doing the exact same assignment and stuck on the algorithm however though when running your code it seems to identify "too many arguments" even though only one argument is provided, consider this algorithm when dealing with arguments(don't forget ./ is considered the "first argument" since it is the zeroth argument provided): enter 0,0 pusha ...


0

It is explained here: How to generate a nasm compilable assembly code from c source code on Linux? but I will give you a full explanation ( I need reputation because I want to vote. Anyway ... ). Step by Step : Step 1 : Write hello.c: #include <stdio.h> int main() { printf( "Hello World \n" ); return 0; } Step 2 : Create the object file : ...


1

It seems that you program for 64-bit Linux. It is a bit difficult to get the right structure from sys/stat.h. I created at last a C program for that: #include <stdio.h> #include <sys/stat.h> int main ( void ) { struct stat file_stat; printf ("__WORDSIZE: %d\n",__WORDSIZE); printf ("__USE_MISC: %d\n",__USE_MISC); printf ...


0

In my reference (although it is 32 bit) the STAT structure is described a little bit different. At least, your structure has size different from 64. struct STAT .st_dev dw ? ; ID of device containing file .pad1 dw ? .st_ino dd ? ; inode number .st_mode dw ? ; protection .st_nlink dw ? ; number of hard links ...


0

Change mov eax, dword [stat + STAT.st_size] to mov eax, dword [STAT.st_size]


0

Some ideas : You're using stosb but you don't setup ES. Are you sure it's already OK? Does line.Substring use 0-based or 1-based indexing?


1

You did not show how you assemble and link. My crystal ball says you have forgotten to link against pthread (ie. use -lpthread). If you don't want to do that, you have to set up fs yourself (e.g. by using arch_prctl(ARCH_SET_FS, .tdata)) and manage all thread related stuff entirely on your own.


0

What if i would tryied do something like this : section .text global _start _start: mov edx,47 ccout: cmp edx,59 ja _end add edx,1 mov [cos],edx mov eax,4 mov ebx,1 mov ecx,cos ;here i don't you esi anymore mov edx,length int 80h jmp ccout _end: mov eax,1 int 80h section .data cos db 0 ...


0

Well, the loop is working, but you aren't using the syscall correctly. There are some magic numbers involved here, so let's get that out of the way first: 4 is the syscall number for write 1 is the file descriptor for the standard output So far, so good. write requires a file descriptor, the address of a buffer and the length of that buffer or the part ...


1

It might be worth reading up on CP/M's solution, which was simply: the binary is always loaded at a fixed address, the OS entry point is always at another fixed address. This was fairly typical on 8-bit machines, even those with formal OSs, and was carried through into MS-DOS. It's also technically feasible with multitasking OSs that utilise an MMU as each ...


0

I guess, your program will be shorter than 64 kb. In this case, the program has only to know the OFFSET of the label (known as Near-Jump). The operating system starts the program everytime at the same OFFSET, but at another segment. condintional jumps and "jmp short" use only the difference between the jmp command and the label. In some special cases, for ...


0

Assemblers use offsets. LABEL . . . . . JMP LABEL // Knows the number of bytes to label. SO label can be anywhere.


3

If machine code is not position-independent, there are two common strategies: include additional information (AKA relocation information) in the executable file that would tell the OS where the absolute addresses are that need to be adjusted just load the executable where it wants, meaning that you may need to first evict another one OR you need to provide ...


2

Use fork and execve syscalls. First use fork to create a new process. In the new process, use execve to load an instance of shell (/bin/sh) with the arguments -c and the command to execute. And then you'll have your own implementation of C RTL's system().


3

Well, there's a nice Manual, you know. http://www.nasm.us if you haven't got it. It matters which output format you're using - the -f switch. In general... section and segment are aliases, they do the same thing. They are not case sensitive, you can use SEGMENT if you want to. Most output formats (not -f obj) have "known names" - .text, .data, .bss (and a ...


0

I fixed it. I downloaded someone else's bootloader which had a correctly functioning Boot Parameter Block. I must have made a mistake on the code on my own file which was preventing XP from recognising the disk as formatted. So it boots correctly now. Thanks so much for your input, Frank Kotler, I have definitely learnt something today and have a basic OS to ...


5

If you are going to learn assembly, then you are much better served learning to use the assembler nasm and the linker ld without relying on gcc. There is nothing wrong with using gcc, but it masks part of the linking process that you need to understand going forward. Learning assembly in the current environment (generally building on x86_64 but using ...


3

You should add -nostdlib when linking your binary. gcc -o hello hello.o -nostdlib


0

You can use the "C" functions "printf" and "scanf". For doing that you need to declare it as "extern". There is a simple example: section .data input_string db 0 format db "%s", 0 output_string1 db "type something", 10, 0 ; "type something\n" output_string2 db "you wrote: %s", 0 extern _printf extern _scanf section .text global ...


1

You can make a 'nxn'-matrix (an array of length n^2), where matrix[i, j] is the quantity of holes between them. If there's no path between the nodes i and j, the quantity of holes is infinity (2^31-1). Then you can find the best path using recursion or just using the Dijkstra algorithm.


2

The program you've built is a DOS program - it won't run directly in Windows (you might be able to run it in compability mode in Windows XP/9x, but certainly not on your 64-bit edition of Windows 8.1). You'll need to run your program in some sort of emulator that can handle DOS programs. Probably the most popular one is DOSBox. If you choose DOSBox you can ...



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