Tag Info

New answers tagged

1

; The code should mimic the following C-code: In addition to wrong boundary noted by Jester, you also have the wrong initialization: your code is equivalent to: for (int i = 0; i < 10; i++) { a[i] = i + 1; // different from stated goal of "a[i] = i;" } However, how do i print array? This is no different from printing array in C, when ...


1

You can do: (gdb) x/10 &array 0x8049618: 1 2 3 4 0x8049628: 5 6 7 8 0x8049638: 9 10 PS: Your code is broken, you need cmp ecx, [arraylen].


0

You ran the assembler this way: nasm -fwin32 main.asm -o main.exe If you assemble with -fwin32 this will not generate an executable. It actually generates an object file. The issue is that an OBJ file in this case is not an executable. It would be like taking a TXT file, renaming it an EXE and trying to run that. It won't. So you should have executed ...


0

By default the text section is not writeable, and the data section is not executable.


1

The primary stumbling block you have run into is attempting to write the value of 0x12 (ASCII 18) to stdout. A quick check of the ASCII chart will reveal that this value is non-printable. In assembly, you can only write characters to stdout. What that means is when faced with writing a numeric value, you have to separate the value into its digits, convert ...


0

You Should Test This Code: mov si,mystr1 call print_string print_string: pusha @repeat: lodsb cmp al,0x00 je @done mov ah,0x0E int 10h jmp @repeat @done: popa ret mystr1 db 'Hello World!',0


2

I met the seemly problem. from the: instead of :" mov rsi, msg", use: "lea rsi, [rel msg]"


1

I had the same issue with the same exercise. I have Windows 7 64bit. My solution was this: Downloaded and Installed DosBox Downloaded 16bit version of NASM from: http://prdownloads.sourceforge.net/nasm/nsm09838.zip?download (other versions of NASM gave me weird errors) Unzipped NASM to c:\nasm16 Using notepad, created prog1.asm file (with containing code) ...


1

printf expects a pointer pushed on the stack for an argument but under C calling convention it is your task to remove this argument from the stack. You omitted this and so the instruction popa puts wrong values in all GPRS and the instruction ret uses the original value of EAX as a destination address thus triggering a segmentation fault. Solution 1 ...


2

You should have read the documentation. NASM's directives come in two types: user-level directives and primitive directives. Typically, each directive has a user-level form and a primitive form. In almost all cases, we recommend that users use the user-level forms of the directives, which are implemented as macros which call the primitive forms. ...


0

Visual Studio for some time now includes MASM to assemble your code and of course it has the linker to build the corresponding executable. You can do it even within the IDE; it is dependent on VS version though. Take a look i.e. here Assembly Programming with Visual Studio 2010/2012 from this link you'll see the linker parameters used in VS 2010/2012, 2014 ...


0

Take a look at the MSVC linker - the linker options page is especially helpful, with a list of the command-line arguments available for the tool. If you need a kick-start, this SO post has information on running it manually.


1

You should be able to put a raw floppy image (or bootloader) straight onto the USB. Use a raw burning program to do so. If you have your own VFD or ISO, you could use UNetbootin to put in onto the USB as it will assist in the booting process. If you have just the files, you could use Winimage to create a VFD or ISO with those files. If you feel stuck, go ...


0

Unfortunately, I can't give you "tested" code to call your gcd sample in Windows (won't do Windows). It might look a little like this, but this is probably not close enough to actually work. ; nasm -f win32 callgcd.asm ; alink -oPE -entry _main callgcd.obj gcdi.obj win32.lib global _main extern _scanf extern _printf extern ExitProcess extern xyz ; that's ...


1

If you're disassembling .o object files that haven't been linked yet, the call address will just be a placeholder to be filled in by the linker. It's more useful to the user to show the actual address of the jump target, rather than disassemble it as jcc eip-1234H or something. Object files have a default load address, so the disassembler has a value for ...


1

-f option selects output format. Try this: nasm prog1.asm -f bin -o progm1.com -l prog1.lst


0

From this page it seems that clock_gettime is the best option on Linux. This blog post has some NASM code that demonstrates how to call the function and this SO answer shows how to link to the function in glibc, as another option.


1

Works for me on GNU/Linux, with yasm. (After removing the _ prefix from function names.) $ yasm -felf64 puts.asm $ gcc -o put puts.o $ ./puts Puts message... That's with the 2nd db line still present: another: db 0 There was another question about almost exactly this problem (a message not printing when there was more data following the ...


2

I tried compiling and running your code myself (alas not on Windows; who says assembly isn’t portable?), and it crashed not on the call _printf or push lines, but on mov [a], ebx. The permissions on the .text segment are read and execute, but not write. a is in .text, and mov [a], ebx tries to write to a, so it tries to write to a non-writable section, and ...



Top 50 recent answers are included