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91

Let's say that logcat show you the following crash log (this is from one of my projects): I/DEBUG ( 31): *** *** *** *** *** *** *** *** *** *** *** *** *** *** *** *** I/DEBUG ( 31): Build fingerprint: 'generic/sdk/generic:2.3/GRH55/79397:eng/test-keys' I/DEBUG ( 31): pid: 378, tid: 386 >>> com.example.gltest <<< I/DEBUG ( ...


38

There's an easier way to do this now (ndk-r7). Check out the ndk-stack command. The docs are in you_android_ndk_path/docs/NDK-STACK.html


21

Performance Techniques First, it depends on which JVM you are talking about, since there are several - but I'm going to assume you mean Oracle HotSpot (and in any case, the other top-tier JVMs will use similar techniques). For that JVM, this list from the HotSpot internal wiki provides a great start (and the child pages go into detail on some of the more ...


20

You can use the V8 snapshot functionality to precompile the code. This still means that you have to have a full version of V8 running to load the snapshot (i.e., you don't get stand-alone native code, it needs to run inside the V8 VM), so all you save is the compilation time. Also, the quality of snapshot code isn't necessarily as good as JIT'ed code ...


14

Ok, so I sat down a buddy of mine that is good with C. I have been showing him Ruby and he digs it. When we met last night I told him that you could write Ruby gems in C, which intrigued him. Here is what we found: Tutorials/Examples http://www.eqqon.com/index.php/Ruby_C_Extension http://drnicwilliams.com/2008/04/01/writing-c-extensions-in-rubygems/ ...


13

I've never used this functionality, but gcc comes with that ability: http://gcc.gnu.org/java/


12

Be careful about your terminology here: The CLR doesn't convert "language code" to MSIL - it converts MSIL to native code on the fly. Java code isn't converted to "native code that is platform independent"; that's an oxymoron. Java source code is converted into platform independent Java bytecode. The JVM converts bytecode into native code in the same way ...


12

Actual performance of course depends on benchmarks and differs by application. But it is easy to see how JIT VMs can be just as fast as statically compiled code, at least in theory. The main strength of JIT code is that it can optimize based on information known only at runtime. In C when you link against a DLL, you'll have to make that function call every ...


11

Use an Installer. Microsoft provides a basic solution so that you can check for dependencies (and install them if they are missing) to ensure that the computer you are deploying your application to meets minimum Framework (and dependency) requirements for your app. If you need something more complex, you can use something like the Nullsoft Scriptable ...


11

You can approximate it by dividing the file size by the length of the audio in seconds, for instance, from a random AAC encoded M4A in my library: File Size: 10.3MB (87013064 bits) Length: 5:16 (316 Seconds) Which gives: 87013064 bits / 316 seconds = 273426.147 bits/sec or ~273kbps Actual Bitrate: 259kbps Since most audio files have a known set of valid ...


11

OK, found it. It was a problem with the jstring parameters. It turns out you cannot pass empty strings (or even NULL for that matter) as a jstring. Instead I used (*env)->NewStringUTF(env, NULL) to create a NULL jstring. Seems to work OK now. Since this question generated somewhat a high activity, I'm posting the final solution below. Note that the ...


10

I'm on the Trello team and wrote the iPhone app. It's all native code except for the attachment viewer, which is just a WebView. We use RestKit to communicate with our API and help cache the data locally to CoreData. Otherwise, it's just a bunch of custom UIViews and UIViewControllers.


10

$, jQuery is just a function. Without invoking it, it's just an ordinary function. A function's constructor is Function, hence $.constructor shows [native code].


10

Solved: to prevent default "Back" button behaivor it is enough to return 1 while handling key event: int32_t app_handle_event(struct android_app* app, AInputEvent* event) { if (AKeyEvent_getKeyCode(event) == AKEYCODE_BACK) { // actions on back key return 1; // <-- prevent default handler }; // ... return 0; }


10

If this is occuring in OSX Mavericks, please ensure the command line tools are installed by running the following. Older editions of OSX & XCode had the install for Command Line Tools in the XCode IDE itself. In OSX Mavericks I had to run the commands below to fix my command line tools so that I could install rubygems using native extensions. $ sudo ...


9

Instead of printf to console you print to logcat using the function __android_log_write(...). More details about how to set this up here: What is the Log API to call from an Android JNI program?


9

Fast JVMs use Just-In-Time (JIT) compilation. The bytecode gets translated into native code on the fly at run time. JIT provides many opportunities for optimization. See this Wikipedia article for more info on JIT.


9

In the book masterminds for programming, James Gosling explained: James: Exactly. These days we’re beating the really good C and C++ compilers pretty much always. When you go to the dynamic compiler, you get two advantages when the compiler’s running right at the last moment. One is you know exactly what chipset you’re running on. So many ...


9

Spoon Studio (was named Xenocode before) seems to be able to do that: http://spoon.net/Studio/Features.aspx RemoteSoft also have a product but the website looks quite old: http://www.remotesoft.com/linker/


9

I believe I've got the main idea of how they did it. Here is the pieces of the puzzle. Any Android application can start a process by calling Runtime.exec() function. Runtime.getRuntime().exec("chmod 755 '/data/data/my.app/files'/native_code"); After this line of code gets executed there is another process spawned. This process runs under the same linux ...


8

Build system for Native Client No version of the Native Client SDK mandates a particular build system; it has been possible at any time to use SCons, GNU Make, CMake, or even just shell scripts. Put differently, the compilers and tools - which are based on gcc and the GNU toolchain - are independent of the build system the developer decides to use. ...


7

The NDK is not native per-se. It is to a large extent a JNI wrapper around the Android SDK. Using NativeActivity gives you a convenient way of dealing with certain app-life cycle events, and add your own native code on top. ALooper, AInputQueue etc. are all JNI wrappers of the Java SDK counterparts, some with additional code that is private and unaccessible ...


7

It really depends on what the other parts of the system are mainly written in. From a performance-only perspective, one PInvoke (via DllImport attribute) call will probably be faster than one COM call if the method arguments do not need any special marshaling. A third, and probably the best alternative, is to create a managed C++/CLI library that calls the ...


7

You can call assembly from Android using the Java Native Interface and the Android NDK. Cedric mentions using the asm keyword, while I prefer to include assembly source code. I have posted a tutorial to do this at my site: http://www.eggwall.com/2011/09/android-arm-assembly-calling-assembly.html You can download the source code for my example and see how ...


7

No, it will be slower, because now it needs to make a function call too.


7

Try this: ARCHFLAGS=-Wno-error=unused-command-line-argument-hard-error-in-future gem install <gemName> For an explanation see this answer


7

The only thing I can come up with is that they would need a whole different compiler that would compile the code into the code that was specific to the machine You've answered your own question! The compiler is the piece that generates machine code that the target platform understands and executes. When people say "native language" they usually mean ...


6

You are forgetting about the just-in-time compiler. An assembly doesn't contain machine code, it is generated at runtime by the jitter from the IL in the assembly. You can look at the IL in the assembly with tools like ildasm.exe or Reflector. Dumpbin.exe has poor support, it can dump the CLR header, that's about it. Beware that the ngen-ed image ...


6

Use this tool.


6

No. An EXE's header is marked with the processor architecture supported by the code contained in the EXE. Use DUMPBIN.EXE -HEADERS to explore. EXE's report the "machine" type as: x86: 0x14C x64: 0x8664 ARM: 0x1C4 If you want to deploy your app, build a version for x86, a version for x64 (ARM comes later with Win8) and author a setup package (MSI) that can ...



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