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0

Use DBScan Clustering. on bounding rectangles.


0

You can specify the range by combining the nearest neighbor parameter with a geometry parameter. For example, the following query will find all docs within 500 meters of the specified lat/long: https://account.cloudant.com/yourDatabaseName /_design/yourDesignDocName/ _geo/yourGeoIndexName ?lat=37.41511369 &lon=-122.2099019 &radius=500 ...


3

Here's a vectorized approach using bsxfun and mat2cell that stores indices of non-zero nearest elements (by euclidean distance) for each zero element in a cell each - %// Assuming A as the input matrix. Store rows, columns of zero and non-zeros [rz,cz] = find(A==0); [rnz,cnz] = find(A~=0); %// Store zero pt indices zero_pts = [rz cz]; %// Get squared ...


4

There's an efficient bwdist function in IPT that computes the distance transform: M = [ 0 1 0 0 0 2 5 0 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 5 0 2 1 ]; [D,IDX] = bwdist(M~=0) The result: D = 1.0000 0 1.0000 1.0000 1.4142 0 0 1.0000 0 1.0000 1.0000 1.0000 1.4142 1.0000 1.0000 1.0000 ...


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This looks like a bug in scipy.interpolate.griddata because the behaviour is not according to the documentation which clearly states that the input argument "fill_value" has no effect when method is "nearest". The output of the following line: scipy.interpolate.griddata(points=np.array([1,2]), values=np.array([10,20]), xi=3, method='nearest', ...


1

Is Euclidean distance a good metric for finding the nearest neighbors in the first place? If not, what are my options? I would suggest soft subspace clustering, a pretty common approach nowadays, where feature weights are calculated to find the most relevant dimensions. You can use these weights when using euclidean distance, for example. See curse of ...



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