Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

42

A negative lookahead says, at this position, the following regex can not match. Let's take a simplified example: a(?!b(?!c)) a Match: (?!b) succeeds ac Match: (?!b) succeeds ab No match: (?!b(?!c)) fails abe No match: (?!b(?!c)) fails abc Match: (?!b(?!c)) succeeds The last example is a double negation: it allows a b followed by c. ...


39

You can use negative lookaheads: ^(?!.*\.\.).*$ That causes the expression to not match if it can find a sequence of two periods anywhere in the string.


25

Try String regex = "/foo/(?!.*bar).+"; or possibly String regex = "/foo/(?!.*\\bbar\\b).+"; to avoid failures on paths like /foo/baz/crowbars which I assume you do want that regex to match. Explanation: (without the double backslashes required by Java strings) /foo/ # Match "/foo/" (?! # Assert that it's impossible to match the following regex ...


19

(?!regex) is a zero-width negative lookahead. It will test the characters at the current cursor position and forward, testing that they do NOT match the supplied regex, and then return the cursor back to where it started. The whole regexp: / FTW # Match Characters 'FTW' ( # Start Match Group 1 ( # Start Match Group 2 ...


17

From perldoc: A zero-width negative look-ahead assertion. For example /foo(?!bar)/ matches any occurrence of "foo" that isn't followed by "bar". Note however that look-ahead and look-behind are NOT the same thing. You cannot use this for look-behind. If you are looking for a "bar" that isn't preceded by a "foo", /(?!foo)bar/ will not do what you ...


11


11

Matcher.matches returns whether or not the whole region matches the pattern. Try using find instead. (Certainly with your example, this works fine.)


11

I love regex gymnastics! Here is a commented PHP regex: $re = '/# Find all AS, (but not preceding a XX == null). \bas\b # Match "as" (?= # But only if... (?: # there exist from 1-150 [\S\s] # chars, each of which (?!==\s*null) # are NOT preceding "=NULL" ...


10

Personally, I'd do this as two separate regex just to make it clearer. while (<FILE>) { next if /^SKIPPING/; next if !/too long/; ... do stuff }


10

It matches because zero is included in "any number". So no spaces, followed by a space, matches "any number of spaces not followed by a Q". You should add another lookahead assertion that the first thing after your spaces is not itself a space. Try this (untested): <@> *(?!QQQ)(?! ) ETA Side note: changing the quantifier to + would have helped ...


9

Lookaheads should be placed before the string is consumed by matching, i.e. href=\"(?!.*&returnurl=AbandonedVehicles\.aspx)(.*)\"


9

You are close: ^(?!.*<title>.*</title>).* By this regex ^.*(?!<title>.*</title>), the regex engine will just find some position that it cannot find <title>.*</title> (end of line is one such valid position). You need to make sure that, from the start of the line, there is no way you can find ...


8

That regular expression would work fine, if you were using PERL or PCRE (e.g. preg_match in PHP). However, lookahead and lookbehind assertions are not supported by most, especially the more simple, regular expression engines, like one that is used by the Notepad++. Only the most basic syntax such as quantifiers, subpatterns and characters classes are ...


8

I think what you want is positive lookahead, not negative, so that you find the key-colon combo ahead of the current position, but you don't consume it. This appears to work for your test example: ([\w]{2})\:(.+?)(?=[\w]{2}\:|$) Yielding: LN: SMITHbbbbbbbb FN: SAMANTHAbb BD: 19400515 PD: 1 BN: 123456 PN: 9876543210 ... Note: I added the colons in my ...


8

Try re = /@\w+\b(?! )/. This looks for a word (making sure it captures the whole word) and uses a negative lookahead to make sure the word is not followed by a space. Using the setup above: var re = /@\w+\b(?! )/, // etc etc for ( var i=0; i<cases.length; i++ ) { print( re2.exec(cases[i]) ) } //prints @bug null @another null The only way this ...


7

It means "not followed by...". Technically this is what's called a negative lookahead in that you can peek at what's ahead in the string without capturing it. It is a class of zero-width assertion, meaning that such expressions don't capture any part of the expression.


7

$string =~ s,<@> *(?!QQQ),at w/o ,; $string =~ s,<@> *QQQ,at w/ QQQ,; One problem of yours here is that you are viewing the two regexes separately. You first ask to replace the string without QQQ, and then to replace the string with QQQ. This is actually checking the same thing twice, in a sense. For example: if (X==0) { ... } elsif (X!=0) { ...


7

You can just put it in a negative look-ahead like so: (?!mak(e|ing) ?it ?cheaper) Just like that isn't going to work though since, if you do a matches1, it won't match since you're just looking ahead, you aren't actually matching anything, and, if you do a find1, it will match many times, since you can start from lots of places in the string where the ...


6

The Matcher.matches() method tries to match the entire string to the pattern. Change your pattern to: ".*FTW(((?!ODP).)+)ODP.*"


6

How about the simpler str.match(/[^%]*/i)[0] Which means, match zero-or-more character, which is not a %. Edit: If need to parse until </a>, then you could parse a sequence pf characters, followed by </a>, then then discard the </a>, which means you should use positive look-ahead instead of negative. ...


6

Lookarounds are "zero-width", meaning they do not consume any characters. For example these two expressions will never match: (?=foo)bar (?!foo)foo To make sure a number is not some specific number, you could use: (?!42)\d\d # will match two digits that are not 42 In your case it could look like: (?!02)[\da-f]{2} (?!0d)[\da-f]{2} or: (?!02 ...


6

The regex should be: TRACE_BR\(TRACE(?!.*END).*?%.* This regex will not match the line if END is a substring appearing after TRACE. You may need to modify the regex if you want a more refined matching. You can think of the regex as: after I matched TRACE (and etc. in front), from the current position, I would like to look ahead that I cannot find END ...


6

You need negative look behind. i.e. you want to search for the end of the string not preceded _array. Note that you need to chomp the line first, as $ will match both before and after a trailing newline. And the conditional operator is meant to return a value - it is not a shorthand for an if statement. use strict; use warnings; while (<DATA>) { ...


6

Your attempt was pretty close; you need to pull the .* that allows an arbitrary distance between the match and the asserted later non-match into the negative look-ahead: /abc\(.*xyz\)\@! I guess this works because the non-match is attempted for all possible matches of .*, and only when all branches have been exhausted is the \@! declared as fulfilled.


5

Lookarounds can be nested. So this regex matches "drupal-6.14/" that is not followed by "sites" that is not followed by "/all" or "/default". Confusing? Using different words, we can say it matches "drupal-6.14/" that is not followed by "sites" unless that is further followed by "/all" or "/default"


5

You can just use a negative lookahead assertion. (?!YourGuidExpression)YourOtherExpression


5

It sounds like you're really just looking for words at the end of the input: /@\w+$/ Tests: var re = /@\w+$/, cases = ['@bug', '@bug and me', '@bug and @another', '@bug and @another and something']; for (var i=0; i<cases.length; i++) { console.log(cases[i], ':', re.test(cases[i]), re.exec(cases[i])); } ...


5

Supposed your language support lazy matching (if it supports look-around, I suppose it also supports lazy quantifier): PRE(.*?)PRE As this answer may be wrong, please specify your language next time. Regex has different set of features for different the languages.


5

Perl imposes an internal limit (happens to be a signed 16-bit integer on most systems) on the size of various regex operations to limit stack growth. This answer has a very good breakdown of the limit. From empirical testing, when the space count gets to 32767, that's when you fail, so it's certainly this limit.



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible