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It is possible, as the following perl snippet demonstrates: use strict; use warnings; my $str = "Foo tells bar that bar likes potato. " . "Bar tells foo that bar does not like potato." ; while ($str =~ m/( bar (?: [^b] | b[^a] | ba[^r] )*? potato )/xmsg) { print STDOUT "$1\n"; } *? is a non-greedy quantifier (Match 0 or more times, not ...


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Try this in Python: >>> import re >>> s = "Foo tells bar that bar likes potato. Bar tells foo that bar does not like potato." >>> re.findall('bar (?:(?! bar ).)+? potato', s) ['bar likes potato', 'bar does not like potato']


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Nice riddle. It can be solved, just not in a very nice way: echo "Foo tells bar that bar likes potato. Bar tells foo that bar does not like potato." | \ pcregrep -o '\bbar\s+(?:(?:(?!bar\b)\w+)\s+)*?potato\b' The outer (?:...) matches a word followed by a space. The inner one makes sure said word is not bar.


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You could use the below positive lookahead based regex. @"(?s)(?:^|\n)([A-Za-z0-9]{5})=(.*?)(?=\n[A-Za-z0-9]{5}=|$)" DEMO If you use DOTALL modifier (?s) in the regex, ^ matches only the start of very first line. So this (?:^|\n) matches the start of very first line or the new line character, which exists before ([A-Za-z0-9]{5})= 5 alphanumeric chars ...


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At first all the @L@ to @R@ blocks and then use alternation operator | to match the string in from the remaining string. To differentiate the matches, put in inside a capturing group. @L@.*?@R@|(in) DEMO OR Use a negative lookahead assertion. This would match the sub-string in only if it's not followed by @L@ or @R@, zero or more times and further ...


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[x+-]\s*(?:may15|may)\K|(?:may15|may)\s*[x+-]\K|(?:may15|may) Try this.See demo. https://regex101.com/r/sJ9gM7/127


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This could be possible through the PCRE verb (*SKIP)(*F) [-x+]\h*may(?:15)?(*SKIP)(*F)|may(?:15)? DEMO At first, [-x+]\h*may(?:15)? matches all the may strings you want to exclude. Then the following (*SKIP)(*F) part makes the match to fail. Now, the regex engine uses the pattern which was next to the | operator to match characters from the remaining ...



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