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4

Yes, it can be done. Citation from the docs: While relationships always have a direction, you can ignore the direction where it is not useful in your application. Note that a node can have relationships to itself as well You can create these relationships just like any others. CREATE (p:Person { name: "Sam" }); MATCH (p:Person { name: "Sam" }) MERGE ...


3

As for "why" your original Cypher attempt does not work, and the answer by @mah does work: Cypher only permits aggregation functions to be used in WITH and RETURN clauses.


3

Depends on how you want to do it. In neomodel, I think StructuredNode class instances have a ._id field. So if you have a node in memory, you can get its ID that way. If you don't have a node that way, you can use cypher and the id() function: neo4j-sh (?)$ CREATE (a:Foo {label: "Hello"}), (b:Foo {label: "Goodbye"}); +-------------------+ | No data ...


3

You can simply get the node with the match statement : MATCH (m:Person) WHERE m.number = 42 RETURN m;


3

If you only care about 2 countries. this query would also work, in addition to the options provided by @DaveBennett. MATCH (c1)<-[:VISITS]-(u)-[:VISITS]->(c2) WHERE c1.name = "France" AND c2.name = "Spain" RETURN u.name;


3

In your query you are matching a single country node and saying the name of that node has to be France and has to be Spain. What you want is to find all of the users that have vistied both France and Spain. There are a couple of ways you can go... //match both countries against the same user and identify them separtely //making two matches in a single ...


3

You may need to think your use case through a bit more carefully. One suggestion is that when you use the traversal framework in java, basically you can build a TraversalDescription and then iterate through what comes back from it by relationships, rather than by Paths or by Nodes. If your primary complaint is that each node is visited only once, you can ...


2

You have target in your WITH clause. It should probably be tg. Whenever you CREATE a relationship between 2 nodes, you have to specify at least the relationship type. This query, for example, will work: MERGE (o:Ot {name:"md2"}) MERGE (pd:PD { p:"23"}) MERGE (tg:Ot {name:"XXX"}) MERGE (pi:PI { id:"123"}) WITH o,pi,tg,pd CREATE UNIQUE ...


2

What ends up happening is that (simplified) the operations will order like so: Q1: MATCH (n) Q2: DELETE (n), COMMIT Q1: RETURN n # Error, n no longer exists For implementation reasons, this is much more likely to happen if cypher is going via an index. The database will eventually handle this for you, but for now, you'll need to wrap that read query in a ...


2

The first thing that I notice (and it make have just been a transcription error, is that there are no directions on the relationships. Also, you're not using labels, so you could be matching on any sub-section of the path. This might work better: MATCH p=(a:User)-[r:VISITS]->(b:Page)-[t:VISITS]->(c:Page)-[q*1..2]->(page:Page) WHERE ...


2

Whats wrong in your query MATCH (u:User)-[r:Visits]->(c:Country) where c.Name='France' AND c.Name='Spain' return u It will always return no rows. Because you are trying to check two values for the same node's property. Sollution MATCH (c1:Country)<-[r:Visits]-(u:user)-[r1:Visits]->(c2:Country) WHERE c1.name = 'France' AND c2.name = 'Spain' ...


2

There are 3 things that might help: If you don't really need merge, you should use just a create instead. Create is more efficient because it doesn't have to check for existing relations Make sure your indexes are correct You now have everything in 1 big transaction. You state the alternative of having every statement in 1 transaction. Neither works for ...


2

The syntax is CREATE (variablename:Label {propertyname:"propertyValue"}) The "n" in CREATE (n:Actor { name:"Tom Hanks" }) does not mean you are creating a node, it is just a variable name here. You can use that variable name further on in the same query if you want. In CREATE (a { name : 'Andres' }), the "a" is a variable name again. This time, a node is ...


2

I'd suggest making a web application using a web framework like Rails, especially if you're new to programming. You can use the neo4j gem for that to connect to your database and create models to access the data in a friendly way: https://github.com/neo4jrb/neo4j I'm one of the maintainers of that gem, so feel free to contact us if you have any questions: ...


2

Cypher's WITH clause is pretty useful for feeding one query into another. Maybe that would be useful? http://neo4j.com/docs/stable/query-with.html


2

First I think you should use the 3.0.x version of the gem (not the release candidate) as it's been out of rc for a while and there are a number of patches that have been applied. Secondly, we made a separate neo4j-will_paginate gem because we weren't able to get access to the original on rubygems: https://github.com/neo4jrb/neo4j-will_paginate_redux That ...


2

The configuration is available in the neo4jrb/neo4j gem, not in neo4jrb/neo4j-core. Try this instead: Neo4j::Session.open :server_db, "http://your_ip:7474"


1

It looks like you don't have the bash shell installed, which is really weird for CentOS. You need to use yum to install bash, which ought to already be there. Try running: yum install bash As the root user.


1

I'm not sure I completely get the question, but here is a stab at an answer. I believe that you want to delete all instances of the nodes labelled TypeX, which means you need to start by finding them all. The current solutions are only matching the nodes when they appear in the middle of certain patterns. Is that the requirement, or can the TypeX nodes ...


1

Just as @cybersam and @DaveBenett suggested you should assign a label to your users. Additionally it might make sense to help Cypher with early termination of branches by introducing WITH statements: MATCH (u:User)-[r:VISITS]->(b:Page) WHERE r.rating < 2 WITH u, b MATCH (b)-[t:VISITS]->(page:Page) WHERE t.rating > 5 RETURN ....


1

I am guessing that you are trying to prevent neo4j from attempting to traverse cyclical paths. If so, you don't need to do anything to get that. Cypher automatically produces acyclical paths, since it does not allow the same relationship to appear twice in a result. (Technically, it can produce one kind of cycle -- where the the start node is the same as the ...


1

How about this? MATCH (u:User)-[r:POSTED]->(m:Message) RETURN id(u), count(m) ORDER BY count(m) Have you had a chance to check out the current reference card? http://neo4j.com/docs/2.1.5/cypher-refcard/


1

A slight change to the query makes it work: MATCH (p:Project)-[:EMPLOYS]-(n:Person) WITH p, MIN(n.age) AS min_age SET p.youngest = min_age;


1

Quoting from the docs: Each Neo4j version supports upgrading from a limited number of previous versions. E.g. when your dataset is on 1.8, you need first use 1.9, then 2.0 and finally 2.1 to fully upgrade. My suspicion is that your dataset is pretty old and you need to upgrade stepwise. See an old blog post of mine for that at ...


1

ok, first cut... out of time to create a more robust example but will take another shot later. I started with a case where there were already nodes in teh list H<--(T {dt:112})<--(T {dt:114}) I realize i create these in ascending order and not descending order too. // match the orphaned tail nodes floating around match (p:Tail) where ...


1

Figured it out - it was as easy as changing my Maven dependency to <version>2.1.6</version>. Duh.


1

I think you're basically right about the TypeX nodes being deleted before they are completely removed. This may work, but I doubt it: MATCH (c)-[e1]-(a:TypeX)-[e2]-(b) CREATE UNIQUE c-[:CONNECTED_TO]-b WITH a MATCH (c)-[e1]-(a)-[e2]-(b) DELETE a, e1, e2; Otherwise I think you'd want to do two queries: MATCH (c)-[e1]-(a:TypeX)-[e2]-(b) CREATE UNIQUE ...


1

Well, the .* syntax isn't going to work, because cypher isn't SQL. :) If you simply do return obj1, that node shows up like a map when output by neo4j-shell. That seems to me like what you're trying to accomplish. But there isn't a way to separate out oall of obj1's properties individually and make them new columns in the result.


1

Well, unsurprisingly, it depends. Apologies if this comes across as a somewhat generic answer, but it may be the best you'll get without a lot more specifics on the nature of your challenge. You need to first outline what your query use cases are, and what the associated data volumes are. If this were a vanilla database and we were trying to optimize ...


1

Which Neo4j version do you use? Yes, please share your queries. If you use LOAD CSV, you will have better performance in creating the nodes separately first with MERGE and then in a second pass create the relationships with MATCH ... MATCH ... CREATE ... see also: http://www.markhneedham.com/blog/2014/10/23/neo4j-cypher-avoiding-the-eager/ If you don't ...



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