Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

6

First, SSDs don't make random access free. Just cheaper. In particular, random writes remain very expensive, though that's mitigated in small random writes by a durable write-back cache. WAL would be very expensive on SSDs if the SSD truly flushed it to the underlying media - but it doesn't. It accumulates it in write-back cache and periodicaly flushes it ...


3

you need to use the classifier for this: test group:"org.neo4j", name:"neo4j-kernel", version: "2.1.5", classifier:"test-jar"


3

Your issue here is actually with C# syntax, not Neo4j at all. This error is because you've referenced a property, Results, but not told the compiler what to do with it. It's like typing 3 in your code and then just leaving it hanging: do you want it assigned to a variable, printed out, or something else? All you need to do is assign this to something: ...


3

You are right that modifying hundreds of thousands of entities as a result of a user action in the same transaction isn't going to be performant. Nested transactions in Neo4j are just "placebo" transactions, as you correctly point out. I would start by thinking about alternative strategies to achieve your goal (which I know nothing about) without needing to ...


2

Best practice for this kind of operation is to convert the data to be imported into csv format and then apply the LOAD CSV command from Neo4j browser. Neo4j community edition has the same capabilities in terms of capacity. Most people use the Neo4j browser as a developer tool to build their cypher queries. The queries then go into an application on whatever ...


2

I'm one of the maintainers of the Neo4jrb project. Indexing is pretty confusing for everyone but I can break it down pretty easily for you. The gem doesn't deal with legacy indexing at all. The "legacy" designation suggests to us that it's not going to be around forever and that coupled with the fact that it's a bit clunky to use led us to decide not to ...


2

I've put together a sample dataset to showcase this to make sure I understand your question. I believe you are wanting to get recipes that have at least all the same ingredients, meaning that the other recipe must have all the same ingredients as the Sweet Cake recipe but might have more ingredients as well. CREATE (sweetcake:Recipe {name:'Sweet Cake'}), ...


2

Using your example graph, the following query will prune the graph in batches as expected: MATCH p=(n1:Node)<-[r*]-(n2) WHERE NOT (n2)<--() WITH last(nodes(p)) AS n LIMIT 5000 MATCH (n)-[r]->() DELETE r, n It's worth noting that the first MATCH statement in this query will cause performance issues at scale. To resolve this, you can apply a label ...


2

try this instead: MATCH (x)-[rels*]->(y) UNWIND rels AS rel RETURN COLLECT( distinct rel.property) AS collected


2

If you're missing a second output, it's likely that the value of that property is a string that is blank. This line: System.out.println(((Node) row.get("A")).getProperty("name").toString()); In the presence of an attribute "name" that is blank, this will print nothing at all (but a linefeed). Also, the way you're doing this is a bit dangerous; keep in ...


2

What you're doing there is recommended in the linux performance guide. 40,000 is considered a healthy limit that ought to work in most cases. Indexes eat up open files, so do network connections. 40,000 ought to be OK for most people, most of the time, but it depends on how many simultaneous connections you expect, and how aggressive your indexing is.


2

You're matching on too many things in your initial MATCH. MATCH (o:Order)-[:INCLUDES]->(p:Product { name:'ball' }) MATCH (o)-[:INCLUDES]->(p2:Product) WHERE p2 <> p MATCH (o2:Order)-[:INCLUDES]->(p2) RETURN p2.name AS Product, COUNT(o2) AS Count ORDER BY Count DESC In English: "Match on orders that include a specific product. For these ...


2

You didn't close the transaction. tx.success() just marks the transaction as being successful but won't commit it. For finishing a transaction use tx.close(). Best practice is to use try-with-resources blocks when doing Java - this cares about calling close() automatically. GraphDatabaseService graphDb = ...; try (Transaction tx = graphDb.beginTx()) { ...


2

Don't completely understand what the desired output of your query should be. You need to use a variable path length match by amending the relationship specification with a quantifier *<lower>..<upper>: MATCH path=(p:Keyword)-[:CONTENTS*0..5]->(content) // match 0 to 5 CONTENTS hops RETURN path, length(path) as len ORDER BY len desc LIMIT 1 ...


2

You could also use the path-finding REST-API, where you provide the start and end-nodes, the types of relationships to traverse and you can provide a cost variable or a function to compute. See: http://neo4j.com/docs/stable/rest-api-graph-algos.html Example request POST http://localhost:7474/db/data/node/54/path { "to" : ...


2

IIUC to is just a Long.MAX_VALUE, and from can be a result of either calling timestamp() function via Cypher or setting the property with the value of System.currentTimeMills() via Java API. Take a look at the example: http://console.neo4j.org/?id=43uoyt (Note that you can skip setting rel.to and use coalesce when querying instead).


1

The RestGraphDatabase is a fake database which doesn't offer all capabilities. It could be made work in theory but would be very wasteful as each presumably embedded operation would go over the wire as http requests. Install Spatial as Plugin to your server and then access it via the plugin REST methods. See: ...


1

You should use paramterized Cypher in order to remove the overhead of parsing the statement and building up the query plan. In your case the statement could be changed to: MERGE (p:Person{guid:{personGuid}}) MERGE (b:Book{guid:{bookGuid}}) CREATE (p)-[:READ]->(b) and supply as parameters: { "personGuid": 1, "bookGuid": 1 } { "personGuid": 1, ...


1

Not being 100% sure but I think that plugins anchored at node level - by using @PluginTarget(Node.class) don't show up at the global extensions. Instead when retrieving a node via REST API there is a extensions block as well referring to node based plugins.


1

For weighted shortest paths in a relatively big dataset, you really need to use the graphalgo package in Java, and build an unmanaged extension (if you're using Neo4j server). Cypher's reduce isn't optimized for this sort of query. Weighted shortest paths will probably have syntax in Cypher eventually. This should get you started: ...


1

You might find this link informative, it addresses many scalability issues. A key quote, that gets to your question: Neo4j is currently not suitable for storing BLOBs/CLOBs. Nodes, relationships, and properties are not co-located on disk. This might be introduced in the future. Now, you can use setProperty on a node to store a byte[] or a String, ...


1

Be sure to have schema indexes in place to speed up looking up start nodes. Before running the import do a: CREATE INDEX ON :Movie(title) CREATE INDEX ON :Keyword(word) Make sure the indexes are populated and online (check with :schema command). Refactor your Cypher command into two queries, to make use of the indexes - for now a index consists only of a ...


1

Cypher queries are software. They're source code. The web interface to neo4j gives you an easy way to enter them, and save them temporarily and so on. But I would recommend that you look at cypher queries you want to save as source code; don't use the web interface to try to do this. Fortunately, if you look at your cypher queries as source code, you can ...


1

The problem is the flatten, which combines nested arrays of arbitrary depth into a flat, large one. I see that you needed to do that to satisfy the format for Hash[key, value, key, value, ...] However, you can pass an integer to flatten to specify the depth, so this does the trick: results["data"].map {|row| Hash[*results["columns"].zip(row).flatten(1)] } ...


1

I think the problem is that the batch importer is interpreting those IDs as actual physical ids on disk. And so the time is spent in the file system, inflating the store files up to the size where they can fit those high ids. The ids that you're giving are intended to be "internal" to the batch import, or? Although I'm not sure how to tell the batch ...


1

You can't use a variable but you can still do it in a cypher query (or at least a few of them) rather than a script. If you only have a handful of different labels this probably works well but not that scalable for many labels. For Example MATCH (n) WHERE length(labels(n)) = 0 and n.type = 'XX' SET n:XX; MATCH (n) WHERE length(labels(n)) = 0 ...


1

A hard-coded solution is to use COALESCE(): MATCH p=shortestPath( (bacon:Person {name:"Kevin Bacon"})-[*]-(meg:Person {name:"Meg Ryan"}) ) RETURN EXTRACT(x IN NODES(p) | COALESCE(x.name, x.title)) Output: Kevin Bacon, A Few Good Men, Tom Cruise, Top Gun, Meg Ryan But this only works because we know that Movie nodes don't have a name property. If ...


1

There is currently no way to create a spatial index using Cypher. You can either use java API or a REST call, see docs at http://neo4j-contrib.github.io/spatial/#rest-api-create-a-spatial-index for details. Since Neo4j browser allows to send HTTP POST you can type there: :POST /db/data/index/node {"name":"geom", "config": {"provider":"spatial", ...


1

You need to compile the jar file using mvn package and drop the jar into your server's plugins folder. In conf/neo4j-server.conf set the following option: org.neo4j.server.thirdparty_jaxrs_classes=example.extension.movies=/<mybaseurlpath>


1

This is a really great question! I think that you're on the right track but there are a few things you can change. First, you need to adjust that has_many method. Your associations always need to terminate at a node, not ActiveRel classes, so you need to rewrite that as something like this: has_many :both, :friends, model_class: 'User', rel_class: ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible