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0

You can do this all in one query; I think the two pieces you're missing are how to copy the node in the first place, and how to "join" subqueries using the WITH keyword. Here's an example. You should triple-check this query, because your terminology and relationship shifting is tricky, so please verify carefully this is what you want. The WITH blocks here ...


0

Neo4j does not have the concept of multiple databases in one Neo4j instance. But you can run multiple databases by setting up multiple instances - even on the same machine. Another option is to organize your graph into multiple distinct subgraphs.


1

You can put it anywhere, but I'd put it into the data/graph.db directory. Assuming you don't have anything important in your data/graph.db directory: rm -rf data/graph.db ./bin/neo4j-import --into data/graph.db --nodes movies4-header.csv Then start neo4j and you'll be starting data/graph.db by default, assuming you haven't changed any of your config: ...


1

First you should avoid using START as it will (hopefully) eventually go away. So to get a neighborhood you could use variable length paths to get all of the paths away from the node MATCH path=start_node-[rel*1..3]-(neighbor) WHERE ID(start_node) = 1859988 RETURN path, nodes(path) AS nodes, EXTRACT(rel IN rels(path) | rel.weight) AS weights; Then you can ...


1

Let's say you're interested in test differences between Run1 and Run2. You can do: MATCH (a:Run)-[x]->(t:Test)<-[y]-(b:Run) WHERE a.name = "Run1" AND b.name = "Run2" AND TYPE(x) <> TYPE(y) RETURN a.name, TYPE(x), t.name, TYPE(y), b.name ORDER BY t.name; Unfortunately your example data doesn't have any instances (between any two runs) where ...


2

Try changing the second MATCH statement to an OPTIONAL MATCH: MATCH (cat:Cat {id:1})-[:lastPost]->(last)-[:next*0..]->(rest) OPTIONAL MATCH (rest)<-[c:Commented]-(u:User) RETURN c, rest Any values that don't match the OPTIONAL MATCH pattern will be NULL.


1

py2Neo is a library which you can generate/configure/manipulate Neo4j graph database. It is not an executable application. As far as your Python works on Windows, py2neo should work as well. You can download py2neo via pip install as you can download many libraries as well.


2

All changes performed by a single Cypher statement are executed in the same transaction. A transaction builds up in memory and gets persisted when you close it. I guess your transaction here grows to large and therefore resulting in a memory error. The usual strategy to deal with this is to use LIMIT on the cypher statement to have a defined size, report ...


1

In a model where post and message are both a node, your query would look like this: match (a:User)<-[:FROM]-(m:Message)-[:TO]->(b:User) where a.username = "C" match (m)<-[:COMMENT]-(post:Post)<-[:POSTED]-(x:User) return distinct m.id,a as from, b as to, x.username as PostAuthor, case x when null then "Message" else "Pulled Post" end as ...


0

It turns out that what I needed to do is make sure my permissions are right. I fixed it with chown -r Neo4j:adm graph.db and everything seems to work fine now. I think Neo4j should produce some sort of warning if it can't access graph.db. Now it just exits without any log


1

Here is a description of what's causing the error. Basically, you're short on memory, an garbage collection isn't finding you any extra free memory. In the neo4j performance tuning guide there's a lot of guidance on how to tweak memory. The first thing to try is to give your JVM more memory; for the shell you need to set something like JAVA_OPTS=-Xmx1024m ...


1

One way would be to MATCH your Person nodes to Skill nodes, filter Skill nodes for your properties and count the number of nodes per Person. If it's as large as the array of properties your filtering, the Person has all the Skills MATCH (p:Person)-[r:HAS]->(s:Skill) WHERE s.name IN ['java', 'fortran', 'cypher'] RETURN DISTINCT p, count(s) I think you ...


2

How about: START n=node(0) MATCH n-[r:HAS_GRADE]->(g:Grade)-[r1:HAS_SYLLABUS]->(sy:Syllabus)-[:HAS_CHILD*]->(c) WHERE any(x in labels(c) WHERE x in ["Subject","Chapter","Topic"]) SET c :Publish RETURN c The WHERE makes sure that the end nodes of the HAS_CHILD carries one the labels given in the list. We're using a variable path length (see the ...


0

Oh so it looks like you are using the client, but not defining an endpoint right? In this case you need to register the message body writer/reader with the client, auto discovery works only with server side. With Genson you can do it this way.


1

I still don't fully understand what you want, a network scheme/drawing might help next time. But I think what you want is similar molecules sharing the same scaffold. I.e. all Molecule pairs connected by isSimilarTo edges, where both Molecules are linked to a defined Scaffold. You can get this by matching the complete path: ...


1

add destroy-method="shutdown" to your bean <neo4j:config base-package="com.em.alert.model" graphDatabaseService="graphDatabaseService"/> <bean id="graphDatabaseService" class="org.springframework.data.neo4j.rest.SpringCypherRestGraphDatabase" destroy-method="shutdown"> <constructor-arg value="${alert.neo4j.url}" index="0"/> ...


0

found the answer as the collect() statement which lets you carry variables through the WITH pipe. MATCH (n:NewsArticle{date:"Jun-30-2015"})-[:about_place]->(l:Location{name:"India"}) MATCH (n:NewsArticle)-[r:about_place]->(loc:Location) WITH loc,collect(n) as article, count(r) as num WHERE num > 2 RETURN loc,article


1

You could add a property to store a string of the date/time that the nodes are added. Then you could query for everything since the last date/time. I'm not 100% sure on the index performance of that, though. However, if all you care about is showing the the most recently imported, you could have a boolean value with an index: CREATE INDEX ON ...


0

This should be most efficient: create constraint on (p:phone) assert p.number is unique; USING PERIODIC COMMIT LOAD CSV WITH HEADERS FROM "file:blahblahblah.csv" AS row with distinct row.A as value MERGE (:phone {number: value}); USING PERIODIC COMMIT LOAD CSV WITH HEADERS FROM "file:blahblahblah.csv" AS row with distinct row.B as value MERGE (:phone ...


0

Something like this? MATCH (parent:Building) WHERE not has(parent.price) match (parent)-->(child) WITH parent, sum(child.price) as price SET parent.price = price Update MATCH path=(root:Building)-[*0..]->(parent)-->(child) WITH parent,child, length(path) as l ORDER BY l desc WITH parent, sum(child.price) as price SET parent.price = coalesce( ...


0

Try: MATCH (n:NewsArticle {date:"Jun-30-2015"})-[:about_place]->(:Location {name: "India"}) MATCH (n)-[r:about_place]->(l:Location) WITH n, count(r) as num WHERE num > 2 MATCH (n)-[:about_place]->(l:Location) RETURN n, l You might want to exclude the original location from the result, for that you need to add an additional filter before the ...


0

I suggest you use the Wikipedia mysql database dump. From that database you can easily find the count of the articles that has a phrase as a link in them. For the parts that you need to find different frequencies and document frequencies of phrases in Wikipedia, you can use Lucene API to index Wikipedia and then Lucene gives you a great range of functions ...


4

Have you tried to install the package yet? install.packages("devtools") devtools::install_github("nicolewhite/RNeo4j")


2

This query should return all the NewsArticle nodes with the date property of "Jun-30-2015" that have an :about_place relationship with Location India and at least one other location: MATCH (n:NewsArticle {date:"Jun-30-2015"})-[:about_place]->(:Location {name: "India"}) MATCH (n)-[r:about_place]->(l:Location) WITH collect(n) AS articles, l, count(r) AS ...


0

So the problem turned out to be that I'm using kernel extensions set with new HighlyAvailableGraphDatabaseFactory().addKernelExtensions(myKernelExtensionsArray). The addKernelExtensions method is deprecated, but these extensions work great with a single server setup. However on this HA server setup they fail for some reason. I was able to reuse my kernel ...


3

The node id (and its assignment mechanism) is a completely internal thing that you as a database user should not care about at all. The only thing to remember is not to store a node id anywhere in a third party system. Depending on the Neo4j version the unused ids will get reused after a restart - but don't rely on this implementation detail.


1

Yes, in recent snapshots, the OGM has been separated from SDN. You'll need to include these two dependencies now to use the test utilities. <dependency> <groupId>org.neo4j</groupId> <artifactId>neo4j-ogm</artifactId> <version>1.1.0</version> ...


1

You need to aggregate the result based on the person you follow (n here): MATCH (u:User{profilname:'Me'})-[follows:FOLLOW]->(n:User) -[rel:MY_VIDEO_IS|MY_SHAREVIDEO_IS]->(v:Video) RETURN v.videoname, collect(n.profilname), collect(type(rel)), count(*)


3

Why would you want to do that? Best practice would be to store the dependency graph (in other words, the "Model" of the time series data) in a graphdb, but the actual time series in something more suited to that. Eg a KV store or a log-specific tool like Splunk... See the KNMI (Dutch Weather Service) example for a case study: ...


0

It looks as if you can just call POST on the index again. I don't know what the implications of this are yet. I also don't know if it creates a new index/node. It does seem to update correctly from my limited testing. Example: POST http://localhost:7474/db/data/index/node/geom { "value": "dummy", "key": "dummy", "uri": ...


0

I ended up using this dependency to solve this: <dependency> <groupId>org.neo4j</groupId> <artifactId>neo4j-jdbc</artifactId> <version>2.0.1-SNAPSHOT-jar-with</version> <classifier>dependencies</classifier> </dependency> Note that it does appear to be an ...


0

In these answers, I assume you will pass the ID list as a parameter named ids. If you want to exclude relationships from a node to itself: MATCH (a)-[r]-(b) WHERE id(a) IN {ids} AND id(b) IN {ids} AND a <> b RETURN r; If you want to include relationships from a node to itself: MATCH (a)-[r]-(b) WHERE id(a) IN {ids} AND id(b) IN {ids} RETURN r;


0

You could do something like this: MATCH (a)-[rel]-() WHERE ID(a) IN {node_ids} RETURN rel, ID(rel), type(rel), ID(startNode(rel)), ID(endNode(rel)) Here you'd be passing in a node_ids parameter which would be an array. Note also that using internal Neo4j IDs for long-term reference to nodes may break if Neo4j defragments the nodes.


0

The error was that in one node the value was Cote d'Ivoire and in another node was Côte d'Ivoire. I made both values the same and now is working.


3

Yes, it can be done - this is a complex query so you might have to play with it a bit, but here's something to start off with. Perhaps someone else can come along and improve on this, but I think this should accomplish most of the basic logic. MATCH p=(node1)-[*]-(node2) WHERE ('A' in labels(node1) OR 'B' in labels(node1) OR 'C' in ...


3

You can use a WITH clause to alias the data you want to return before deleting the node and relationship. Something like this: MATCH (n:Topic {mongoId: {_id} })-[r]-() WITH r.mongoId as docId, n,r DELETE n,r RETURN docId Or you could break it up into two queries, one to retrieve the property you want, then the second to delete the relationship and ...


1

If you're using the Java API, you can quickly get an iterator of all the Labels in the database like so: GraphDatabaseService db = (new GraphDatabaseFactory()).newEmbeddedDatabase(pathToDatabase); ResourceIterable<Label> labs = GlobalGraphOperations.at(db).getAllLabels();


0

I think this is easiest to do in your client app, just keep the id's requested in an array and put the results in a keyed array (dictionary) and retrieve them by the id in your original array. Just a general note, you can use parameters in cypher and the IN clause to replace your OR construct. MATCH (campaign:Campaign) WHERE campaign.id IN {campaign_ids} ...


2

I'm not sure if there's a better way than this: MATCH ()-[r:about_place]->(n) WITH n, count(r) as rel_cnt WHERE rel_cnt > 4 MATCH (a)-[r:about_place]->(n) RETURN a.title,n.name,rel_cnt; Also, unsolicited notes: You might want to use the label in your query (like MATCH ()-[r:about_place]->(n:location)) for better performance Neo4j convention ...


1

You diagram was a little complicated, but all you are asking is to find those relationships which are of the type OF and has the node type E_App4 as the end node. There is no restricion on the start node. So this query should work: match (startNode) -[of:OF]->(endNode:E_App4) return startNode, of, endNode; This ofcourse assumes the following: the ...


2

In recent snapshots, the OGM has been split from SDN, as such the test utilities have to be included explicitly- testCompile 'org.neo4j.test:neo4j-harness:2.2.2' testCompile 'org.neo4j:neo4j-ogm:1.1.0:tests' You can drop testCompile 'org.neo4j:neo4j-ogm-test:1.1.0.BUILD-SNAPSHOT:tests'


1

I think you can use this to trigger the right converter: @GraphProperty(propertyType=long.class) private java.sql.Timestamp generationTs;


1

As Luanne suggests, you'll need to do this in two steps at the moment. For the repository method you could try something like this instead: @Query("MATCH (p:Person)-[rel]->(node) WHERE p.firstName = {firstName} RETURN DISTINCT p ORDER BY COUNT(rel)") Iterable<Person> findSomething(@Param("firstName") String firstName); This should return the ...


0

Just check out the documentation of the neo4j node driver You'll see that you can write your queries either as part of service/helper methods or as part of your domain model. The data is stored in a directory on disk, which is configured in conf/neo4j-server.properties


0

For this use case, you'll have to return ID(person) and use the repository.findOne or neo4jOperations.load instead.


1

I would split this one up, into creating nodes once and creating relationships (each) second: USING PERIODIC COMMIT 10000 LOAD CSV WITH HEADERS FROM "file:///Users/btibert/Dropbox/Projects/bentley-search-neo4j/data/templates.csv" AS row WITH row MATCH (r:Vendor {name:row.vendor}) WITH row, r MERGE (p:Template {name:row.template_clean}) MERGE (v:Version ...


-1

You usually have to do Class.forName("org.neo4j.jdbc.Driver") first to load the driver class. What does your JDBC URL look like? Please note that the JDBC driver (in the remote case) will return a Map with the data of each node.


0

Your code will never even compile. You should not name your transaction variables the same, the inner tx1 shadows the outer tx1 And the construct try () {} already does a close automatically, so you close your inner tx twice. And your outer tx get's never committed, because you never call tx1.success() on it. The inner transactions, don't actually ...


2

Avoid eager loading in LOAD CSV. It doesn't respect PERIODIC COMMIT. See this article by Mark Needham for a thorough explanation.


1

neo4j 2.2 introduced authentication which is enabled by default. When you open the webinterface (usually http://localhost:7474/browser) for the first time, you will be asked to set a username/password. The default is neo4j/neo4j. Here is how to use authentication in py2neo: from py2neo import authenticate, Graph # set up authentication parameters ...



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