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17

First up, for Neo4j 2 and onwards, you always need to start with the frame of reference "how would I do this in Cypher?". Then, and only then, do you worry about the C#. Now, distilling your question, it sounds like your primary goal is to create a node, and then return a reference to it for further work. You can do this in cypher with: CREATE (myNode) ...


9

Chris Skardon is right, you might want to iron out the categories a little bit. Neo4j is not a graph layer on top of a relational database, it is a competing/complementary kind of database. While it's possible to imitate your relational schema in Neo4j, its probably not very useful, and you will likely have to do a some remodeling to benefit from using ...


8

Have you tried assembly version redirect via app.config/web.config? <runtime> <assemblyBinding xmlns="urn:schemas-microsoft-com:asm.v1"> <dependentAssembly> <assemblyIdentity name="Newtonsoft.Json" publicKeyToken="30ad4fe6b2a6aeed" culture="neutral" /> <bindingRedirect ...


7

I'm the author of Neo4jClient. (The guy who gives his software away for free.) Q1a: "Can I use the CRUD API to look up node A by its ID, create node B from a POCO, create a relationship between A and B" Cypher is the way of not just the future, but also the 'now'. Start with the Cypher (lots of resources for that): START user=node:user(Id: 1234) ...


7

This query: start n = node(64) match n--x return x.Name; Should be written in C# as: var query = graphClient .Cypher .Start("n", node) // START n=node(123) .Match("n--x") // MATCH n--x .Return<string>("x.Name"); // RETURN x.Name There were a few problems with the sample code you provided: There will ...


6

In your CreateRelationship call you will need to use the node references, not the nodes, so: client.CreateRelationship(departure.Reference, new flys_toRelationship(arrival.Reference) { flightNumber = "4" }); The reason why your initial creation code works and this didn't is because Create returns you a NodeReference<Airport> (the var is hiding that ...


6

The example uses the old API based way of using 'Create' so you used to do: client.Create person now you can (and should) use the Cypher version: let createPerson person = client.Cypher .Create("(p:Person {param})") .WithParam("param", person) .Return<Person>("p") .Results .Single(); let pA = ...


6

Your syntax may be incorrect. Please use the syntax below to prevent creating duplicate nodes. GraphClient client = GetNeo4jGraphClient(); client.Connect(); client.Cypher .Merge("(user:User {Id: {newUser}.Id })") .OnCreate() .Set("user = {newUser}") .WithParams( new { newUser = ...


6

I can't say why the first query isn't working, I can't test it right now as my version of Neo4j isn't letting me use parameters in my MATCH clause. However - I do get my version (below) responding fine. In terms of timing out, the [*..150] is quite a large potential traversal. could you try running: var pathsQuery = Client.Cypher .Match("p = ...


6

You can do what you want, here's how (combination of my first answer, with @cybersam's addition). You just do it with a node property you create and then remove, instead of an unbound variable as you've been trying. MERGE(tom:Person {id:'Tom Jones'}) ON CREATE set tom.temp_bool = true ON MATCH set tom.temp_bool = false WITH tom, tom.temp_bool AS result ...


5

The problem is that you're trying to persist the DB connection inside the node itself. Here's your definition of the node's data structure: class New_Node { public GraphClient Node { get; set; } } That says that you want a property on the node called "Node" that holds the connection to the DB that contains the node. Tongue twisted yet? Mine is. ...


5

I think what you're missing here is that the Return statement returns one object per Cypher row. Your query is returning a table like this: |-----------------| | n | m | |-----------------| | Node | Node | |------------------ That's one table, with one row, with two columns. In this statement, you are returning an anonymous type per ...


5

You can create a parameterless constructor for your relationship type, you just pass it 'duff' data, which I know sounds bad, but as you don't really need it, it won't hurt you: public class ActedIn : Relationship<ActedInPayload>, IRelationshipAllowingSourceNode<Actor>, IRelationshipAllowingTargetNode<Movie> { public ActedIn() : ...


4

Use: .Return<Node<User>>("x") and it will return the Node which has a Reference property.


4

The below code will add a synonym to a rootword: (You'll probably want to check if your 'word' and 'synonym' is already in the db so you could just create a relationship) public static void AddNodeToDb(IGraphClient graphClient, string index, RootWord word, RootWord synonym) { if (!graphClient.CheckIndexExists(index, IndexFor.Node)) { var ...


4

There's a lot to be found in the test cases... Such as this: http://hg.readify.net/neo4jclient/src/4693da483a90/Test/ApiUsageIdeas.cs


4

Try: var query = _client.Cypher .Start("n", graphClient.RootNode) .Where("has(n.Name)") .And() .Where("n.Name =~ 'X.*'") .Return<Meeting>("n"); This worked on my machine, you'll get the results like: var results = query.Results; Edit: I think I've realised why yours had problems, in the beginning, you put StartCypher("n") and ...


4

Poor performance caused by overhead in processing RESTful Cypher query. Mostly it is network overhead but overhead caused by need to parse query also exists. Use Core Java API when you interested in high performance. Core Java API provides more than 10 times faster requests processing than Cypher query language. See this articles: Performance of Graph ...


4

It's because the results you bring back from the collect statement are basically strings with no defining columns. JSON.NET can't infer what the columns are (and you can't use AS to help it), so all you get are strings like: "[\r\n"EnvType1",\r\n"AppEnvId1",\r\n"App2",\r\n"App 2"\r\n]" Which you can get by using the following query: _connectedClient ...


4

You could (depending on how you feel about it) try using dynamic, for example, you can set it up like so: var dog = new Dog {Name = "Woofer", Breed = "Afghan Hound"}; var owner = new Person {Name = "Jeff", PhoneNumber = "01234567890"}; //CREATE gc.Cypher. Create("(owner:Person {ownerParams})") .WithParam("ownerParams", owner) .With("owner") ...


4

It looks like the last Count() is returning the number of elements returned by .Return(n => n.Count(), which will always be 1 element (a single number). Try removing .Count() from the end (and replacing it with Single()): query = client.Cypher .Match("(n { Name: 'a'})") .Return(n => n.Count()) .Results ...


4

Your issue here is actually with C# syntax, not Neo4j at all. This error is because you've referenced a property, Results, but not told the compiler what to do with it. It's like typing 3 in your code and then just leaving it hanging: do you want it assigned to a variable, printed out, or something else? All you need to do is assign this to something: ...


4

You could do something like this with cypher and have the cypher return a composite object. match (t:Tile)-[:CONTAINS_USER]-(u:User) where t.name =~ 'Tile.*' with {name: t.name, users: collect(u) } as tile return collect(tile) as tiles


4

It's not possible to do that. Neo4j is a Java application and you need JVM to run it. What you can try is IKVM.NET to run Neo4j in the .NET VM and call those methods from C# code. You mentioned you want to embedded db for integration testings. I suggest to start new instance of Neo4j as part of test run. Only for testing purposes.


4

I discovered the problem. There was a entity in the database which had a very long number which was larger than int64 causing the deserializer to throw a exception (was trying to insert a number larger than int64 into a int64 property). Today's lesson: Make sure the data fit into the model :)


4

You can clearly read in the inner exception that it can't load the assembly Newtonsoft.Json. Reference Newtonsoft.Json, preferable by using NuGet.


3

Ok, it was a simple answer. I need to set the return type to just "App" instead of "ICollection" since the query already returns a collection. var query = client.Cypher.StartWithNodeIndexLookup("root", AUTOINDEX, PrimaryIndexKey, uname) .Match("root-[:WishList]-apps") .Return<App>("apps"); var results = await ...


3

Just to expand on ulkas' answer, if you want to enable auto indexing and found the documentation a little confusing (like I did the first time I read it), this is how you set it up. Let's say you want to automatically index some node properties; say, "name" and "job". Open up the /conf/neo4j.properties file and you should see something like this: # ...


3

You could use an extension method for the IGraphClient itself: public static class GraphClientExtensions { public static RelationshipInstance<T> GetRelationship<T>(this IGraphClient graphClient, RelationshipReference relationshipReference) where T : Relationship, new() { if(graphClient == null) throw new ...


3

It sounds like you want access to data stored on relationships. We refer to these as "payloads". You can query them like so: client .RootNode .OutE<FooPayload>() .Select(p => { p.Reference.Id, // Relationship ID p.StartNodeReference, // Outbound vertex p.EndNodeReference, // Inbound vertex ...



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