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1

I think the first one (List with three labels per item) is the neatest idea. You can use the class attribute later to position them as you wish. And for the moment is the most logical way of representation. The table is also ok.


2

This is relatively using the enumerate keyword in python. Specifically in your case since it seems all of the nested lists are at the same level you can just iterate through the top-level list: for index, item in enumerate(x): if (item[2], x[index+1][2], x[index+2][2]) == (4, 5, 5): item[2] = 9 x[index+1][2] = 10 x[index+2][2] = ...


0

A simple filter over the cartesian product of the two lists would produce what you want but the run time may be unacceptable. Lets start with that: match_pairs = [] for current_lb_coord in LBCoord: for current_core_coord in CoreCoord: if abs(current_lb_coord[0] - current_core_coord[0]) <= xRange and abs(current_lb_coord[1] - ...


0

You can use filter and zip : >>> filter(lambda x : abs(x[0][0]-x[1][0])==145 and abs(x[0][3]-x[1][4])==66 , zip(LBCoord,CoreCoord)) [([1000, 400], [1145, 466])]


1

List comprehensions are great, but sometimes they're not best the solution, depending on requirements for readability and speed. Sometimes, just writing out the implied for loop (and if statement) is more readable and quicker. def factors(n): l = [] for i in range(1, int(n**0.5)+1): if n % i == 0: l.append(i) ...


1

Use itertools.chain: from itertools import chain def f1(n): return list(chain.from_iterable([i, n//i] for i in xrange(1 , int(n**0.5) + 1) if not n % i)) If you don't need a list remove the list call on chain and just iterate over the returned chain object. If optimization is important you should use extend and xrange: def f1(n): l = [] ...


0

You can achieve the desired result using sum(). For example: >>> sum([[1,6],[2,3]],[]) [1, 6, 2, 3] We can define the answer in terms of your existing code: def f2(n): return sum(f1(n), []) However, be careful that your code returns the square root twice when n is a perfect square: >>> f1(9) [[1, 9], [3, 3]] >>> f2(9) ...


0

Actually, think it in another case. Assume that if your list is this; [[1, 1, 1, 1], [1, 1, 1, 1], [1, 1, 1, 1]] and if you write myList[0][0] = 5 output will be; >>> [[5, 1, 1, 1], [1, 1, 1, 1], [1, 1, 1, 1]] >>> As you expected. But since you define your list variable like this; [[1] * 4] * 3 Python will process your codes on ...


0

You could write a query that returns an ordered list: customer order orderline ... 1 1 1 1 1 2 1 2 1 2 3 1 Client side, you can iterate over this rowset and create a new customer whenever the customer id changes, a new order when the order number changes, and so on. The fact that this ...


1

Using zip splats (zip(*a)) is a good way to convert rows to columns. Then sort the columns and convert back. The only problem is that you can't compare None to str, so you'll have to define some custom sorting algorithm, e.g.: def sorter(char): if char is None: return chr(0x101111) # largest character # this is certainly a kludge ...


-1

The way you laid this data out make me suspect it was really a series. I know some people suggested you use sorted, however that won't work with NoneType. Long story short, I really think you ought to convert this to a list of Pandas Series, especially if you want headers, here's one ugly way of doing this. import pandas as pd a = [['header1', 'header2', ...


-1

Here is what I come up with, which turned out to be ~30x faster than iterating over the nested list and loading individually. def flatten(nl): l1 = [len(s) for s in itertools.chain.from_iterable(nl)] l2 = [len(s) for s in nl] nl = list(itertools.chain.from_iterable( itertools.chain.from_iterable(nl))) return nl,l1,l2 def ...


0

You're building a paradox: you want to flatten the object, but you don't want to flatten the object, retaining its structural information somewhere in the object. So the pythonic way to do this is not to flatten the object, but writing a class that will have an __iter__ that allows you to sequentially (ie. in a flat manner) go through the elements of the ...


0

First, you need to define how your objects should be compared. As Distinct() internally uses a set (no duplicates allowed in a set collection) and sets use equality and hash codes to determine what is the same, you have to override Equals and GetHashCode methods (or implement IEquatable<> interface). I think that base implementation of those two ...


1

The best solution so far is the following: rmatch <- function(x, name) { pos <- match(name, names(x)) if (!is.na(pos)) return(x[[pos]]) for (el in x) { if (class(el) == "list") { out <- Recall(el, name) if (!is.null(out)) return(out) } } } rmatch(smth, "a1") [1] 1 rmatch(smth, "b3") [1] 6 Full credit goes to @akrun ...


1

Assuming your encryption function is well-formed, this should produce the output you requested. Basically it works by creating a shared iterator that will keep its place between calls of the subroutine. def sentence(text): iter_text = iter(text.split()) # split text on spaces and create a single iterator from it def word(i_text, num_chars): ...


0

Ok it is a little more clear after your comment that you cannot affect the html. Here is a fiddle showing my suggestion: http://jsfiddle.net/knnzmutq/ .simple li{ color:black; } .simple > li, .simple > li > ul > li{ color:red; } The basic idea here is you first define the styles for normal li elements within .simple and then ...


0

CSS doesn't have a selector such as that as far as I know. I would use jQuery for this. Here's an example that uses jQuery to replace TARGET with a span containing a custom class around the word TARGET. .targetClass { color: green; font-weight: bold; } $("ul.simple > li").html(function () { return $(this).html().replace(/TARGET/g, "<span ...


0

You won't be able to parse the content of the LI element without some scripting. A common approach to this is to assign a class to the relevant item. <li class="target">


0

An option would be to give your 'targets' a class, like: .target { background-color:rgba(20,20,20,0.2); } .target > ul { background: white; } <ul class="simple"> <li class="target"> TARGET <ul> <li class="target"> TARGET <ul> <li></li> ...


0

I created a demo using ur code ,its works fine. i have seen lots of un-needed code in ur demo ,Like you have added proxy to the store etc. But i clearly see a minor mistake you made # See storeId its "Tree" and look at Ext.getStore('TreeStore'); I hope you got my point Thanks


8

You could return a list as the result at the current nesting level and join together the nested results using extend. l = [['A', ['A', 'B', ['A', 'B', 'C'], ['A', 'B', 'D']], ['A', 'D', ['A', 'D', 'A']], ['A', 'C', ['A', 'C', 'B'], ['A', 'C', 'A']], ['A', 'A', ['A', 'A', 'D']]]] def un_nest(l): r = [] k = [] for item in l: if type(item) ...


0

As an alternative, you can use flatten with len: from compiler.ast import flatten my_list = [[1,2,3],[3,5,[2,3]], [[3,2],[5,[4]]]] len(flatten(my_list)) 11 PS. thanks for @thefourtheye pointing out, please note: Deprecated since version 2.6: The compiler package has been removed in Python 3.


0

Here is my implementation: def nestedList(check): returnValue = 0 for i in xrange(0, len(check)): if(isinstance(check[i], list)): returnValue += nestedList(check[i]) else: returnValue += 1 return returnValue


1

You are essentially looking for a way to compute the number of leaves in a tree. def is_leaf(tree): return type(tree) != list def count_leaves(tree): if is_leaf(tree): return 1 else: branch_counts = [count_leaves(b) for b in tree] return sum(branch_counts) The count_leaves function counts the leaves in a tree by ...


7

This function counts the length of a list, counting any object other than list as length 1, and recursing on list items to find the flattened length, and will work with any degree of nesting up to the interpreters maximum stack depth. def recursive_len(item): if type(item) == list: return sum(recursive_len(subitem) for subitem in item) else: ...


0

This is an alternative solution, which might be not so performant, since it fills a new flattened list, which is returned at the end: def flatten_list(ls, flattened_list=[]): for elem in ls: if not isinstance(elem, list): flattened_list.append(elem) else: flatten_list(elem, flattened_list) return ...


3

This is just a syntax issue. NetLogo understands foreach turtle-data crt as meaning foreach turtle-data [ crt ? ], and then the rest is parsed as separate commands, hence the error you're seeing. You want: foreach turtle-data [ crt 1 [ set ... ] ] with the square brackets to delimit where the body of the loop begins and ends. Note that you must ...


1

Package yii2-nested-set-behavior was written for Yii 2 beta. Use https://github.com/creocoder/yii2-nested-sets since its complete overhaul for Yii 2 release and compatible with any other behaviors.


4

Try this val data = List(List(1, 2, 3, 4), List(1, 2, 2, 3, 4), List(1, 2, 3, 3, 3, 4), List(1, 2, 3, 4), List(2, 3, 4)) val map = data.map(_.groupBy(identity)).foldLeft(Map[Int, List[Int]]()) { case (r, c) => r ++ c.map { case (k, v) => k -> (if (v.size > r.getOrElse(k, List()).size) v else r(k)) } }.values.flatten ...


0

I don't quite get it, but you can just order elements data.flatten.sorted Which would give you List(1, 1, 1, 1, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 4, 4, 4, 4, 4) if you want them ordered by number of encounters, you can do it like this: data.flatten.groupBy(k => k).mapValues(_.size).toList.sortBy(_._2).map(_._1) which would give you List(1, ...



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