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From javadoc of ArrayList: The iterators returned by this class's iterator and listIterator methods are fail-fast: if the list is structurally modified at any time after the iterator is created, in any way except through the iterator's own remove or add methods, the iterator will throw a ConcurrentModificationException. Since your two iterators ...


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When trying one the the other answers, the function was unable to recurse, and so I modified it to not recurse. It still works quite quickly, and can handle large nested lists (at least as far as I can tell with my testing). It is a Python 3 only function. # Originally by Bruno Polaco def traverse(item, reverse=False): its = [item] #stack of items ...


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I solved this problem recently. You can follow the accepted answer here: http://stackoverflow.com/a/32086918/4757307 You should implement your custom linearlayout


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The solution for something like this is very involved. Here is an untested solution I whipped up. I'll leave it to you to test and adjust it: This class attribute is used to specify which field or property on a class should be treated as the Id value of instances of the class. [AttributeUsage(AttributeTargets.Class)] public class IdPropertyAttribute : ...


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It looks like your icon will always be drawn the same size. If you want to be able to vary the size according to the dimensions, as I take it, you'll have to parametrize your icon functions. Something like def NBC(height, width, x, y) Then you'll have to add code to move to (x, y) to begin with. I haven't looked at turtle graphics in many years, so I ...


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Post-order depth first walk of nested list postwalk<-function(x,f) { if(is.list(x)) f(lapply(x,postwalk,f)) else f(x) } Replacement function that returns modified list rather than mutating in place replace.kv<-function(x,m) { if(!is.list(x)) return(x) i<-match(names(x),names(m)); w<-which(!is.na(i)); replace(x,w,m[i[w]]) } ...


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If, upon invocation of openItem(item), you also want to select/open its ancestors, then its best to have the reference from item to its parent, for example, item.$$parent. That would enable you to traverse the item's ancestors and modify them. Conceptually speaking, it would look like so: $scope.openItem(item){ item.isOpen = true; while (item.$$parent){ ...


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Turn the first list into a dict: a = [[1, 2], [3, 5], [4, 4], [5, 7]] b = [[1, 3], [4, 4], [3, 5], [3, 5], [5, 6]] filt = dict(a) result = [el for el in b if el[0] in filt and el[0] == filt[el[0]]] Alternatively, turn the first list into a set of tuples, and just check for membership: filt = set(map(tuple, a)) result = [el for el in b if tuple(el) in ...


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Your script works fine for me, just add: return unique


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Replace your 2-item lists with tuples and you can use set operations (because tuples are immutable and lists not, and set items must be immutable): a = {(1,2),(3,5),(4,4),(5,7)} b = {(1,3),(4,4),(3,5),(3,5),(5,6)} print(a.symmetric_difference(b)) # {(1, 2), (1, 3), (5, 6), (5, 7)} Note this also removes duplicates within each list because they are sets, ...


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You need to add an empty <ul class=sortable></ul> to the second <li> so that when you drop subelements that <ul> can pick it up Here like this CodePen



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