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19

Quick fix: run TERM=xterm screen instead of screen. You get the error because on your mac you have TERM=xterm-256color, and xterm-256color is not in the remote machine's termcap. You don't get the error when you connect from the other computer because it has its TERM variable set to something else.


11

In their article 'Program Design in the UNIX Environment', Pike & Kernighan discuss how the cat program accreted control arguments. Somewhere, though not that article, there was a comment about 'cat came back from Berkeley waving flags'. This is a similar issue to the problem with echo developing options. (I found a reference to the relevant article ...


9

Try invoking your wrapper with /usr/bin/env. It's actually good practice to execute Ruby scripts with /usr/bin/env ruby as you don't have to hard code the path to the ruby binary, so this is not unnatural. $ cat ruby_wrapper.sh #!/bin/bash exec ruby "$@" $ cat wrapped.rb #!/usr/bin/env /tmp/ruby_wrapper.sh puts "hello world" $ ./wrapped.rb hello world ...


6

You will notice there is not really that much bloat growth. Most of the lines of code are comments. Most of the lines of code that are not comments, are usage documentation, so when somebody goes 'echo --help' it will do something. Code outside of the above appears largely to be handling the arguments echo can take, as well as the "special" expansion for ...


6

SIOCOUTQ is the Linux equivalent of FIONWRITE. I don't believe there is a direct FIONSPACE equivalent: instead, you can subtract the value returned by SIOCOUTQ from the socket send buffer size, which can be obtained with getsockopt(s, SOL_SOCKET, SO_SNDBUF, ...).


4

You can add it personally to $HOME/.termcap - run this on your NetBSD account: infocmp -C xterm-color | sed -e 's/xterm-color/xterm-256color/' > $HOME/.termcap But you can also as root (or ask root) to add the termcap entry to /usr/share/misc/termcap. That would fix it for all users.


4

In C, assigning a void* to a T* is legal (not so in C++). Therefore the code's perfectly valid. Quoting "The C Programming Language 2nd Edition" by K&R: Any pointer to an object may be converted to type void * without loss of information. If the result is converted back to the original pointer type, the original pointer is recovered. Unlike the ...


3

/usr/include/x86/float.h defines as LDBL_MIN as 3.3621031431120935063E-4932L And this value is greater than printf result. LDBL_MIN is the minimum positive normalized value of type long double. The type can represent smaller numbers, they are just subnormal. I can only speculate about the nature of the problem on NetBSD, but there are two main ...


2

A setup using the Common Address Redundancy Protocol (CARP) might be a good place to start: http://www.netbsd.org/docs/guide/en/chap-carp.html It can be used for a number of things including failover and load-balancing.


2

It's entirely possible that the architecture you're wanting to build is not fully supported by netbsd-5 (aka NetBSD 5_STABLE.) I would recommend trying to build either netbsd-6, or -current (aka HEAD) After all, 5_STABLE is rather long in the tooth, having been branched in late 2008, and released in early 2009. With NetBSD's build.sh mechanism, you can ...


2

That is a function prototype, otherwise known as a declaration. The implementation (definition if you choose) is in the kernel sources. You can find those online, or (if you chose to install sources) on your local FreeBSD machine (under /usr/src/sys). There are actually several copies, depending on the hardware for which the kernel is compiled. (The ...


2

The obvious portion is that ``-Wl,-R/usr/X11R7/lib'' was not included on the loader command line at link time. NetBSD's runtime loader (/libexec/ld.elf_so) has only the runtime library search path of ``/lib:/usr/lib'' compiled in, so any executable needing additional elements on the search path needs to explicitly add them at compile time. (like the entry ...


2

What happens if you rename your xorg.conf.new to /etc/X11/xorg.conf? Does startx or xdm work then? Are you running this inside a VirtualBox or other emulator? I have NetBSD on a Thinkpad T420 which I occasionally boot into Windows, and I've setup VirtualBox to be able to run the same NetBSD install when I'm in Windows. The key difference in the xorg.conf ...


2

Intel describes platform-level error handling in a high-level document titled Platform-Level Error Handling Strategies for Intel Systems That document doesn't specifically cover the Centerton (64-bit Atom) that you mention though (but it does give some good overview of how Intel thinks of hardware error reporting). However since the Centerton is a System-...


2

The easiest way is probably to have the NetBSD source tree checked out and using the build.sh script to just build the cross-compiler. http://www.netbsd.org/docs/guide/en/chap-build.html#chap-build-tools Run uname -m on the target system to see the target machine type that you would use with build.sh. For the different options to download the NetBSD ...


2

Yes, this is a potential bug. If you want a similar function that most likely reentrant you could use e.g. inet_ntop (which incidentally handles IPv6 as well).


2

The new way is to place files under src/external//. For bash, it's src/external/gpl3/bash. (This directory is called ${EXTTOPDIR.bash} hereafter.) The original source is expanded into ${EXTTOPDIR}/dist as is. Other files and directories are made at ${EXTTOPDIR}. Start with copying src/external/gpl2/xcvs for example. (BSD) makefiles that are placed (out ...


2

I do not know exactly why you are facing this problem, but I can provide you with some next steps to try. Notice that the first error is that pthread_detach is missing. The system header files will typically make sure whatever headers they need are included, but you can try adding <pthread.h> above all the other headers. If that fails, you need to ...


2

If you aren't interested by AppKit, you may also take a look at https://webkeks.org/objfw/. Runtimes may contain assembly bits that you will want to verify that they will actually work on specific CPU type. Old Foundation library like libFoundation may also suite your needs. If you want to use thing like Objective-C++ or Objective-C 2.0, I'd recommend clang ...


1

Don't put the ./ path prefix on the target name. I.e. just run: nbmake-evbarm helloARM I'm assuming of course that you have a Makefile in the same directory which looks a bit like this, at minimum: PROG = helloARM .include <bsd.prog.mk> You must have such a local Makefile which uses the standard NetBSD macros because when there is no makefile (...


1

Very mysterious. Your error messages like "from rfa_cli.c:7:" imply there are 6 lines of code before the "first" line "#include ..." of your C file . Maybe there is some issue with your editor that is hiding these lines - some stray line ending or something. Recommend try compiling with only the "#include ..." in your file to see if the first error still ...


1

Since this is an ''export'' it probably means it was a CVS export of the main NetBSD tree. See: http://netbsd.org/releases/formal.html A date of 1998 / April / 07 (this is how I read the date of the export) - so that would be a CVS version between NetBSD 1.3.1 and NetBSD 1.3.2. Make of that what you will, since I am not a NetBSD expert (but I have ...


1

While doing it with sed might be interesting, I'd recommend awk as the right tool for this (and any similar) job: ifconfig -a | awk '{ for (i = 1; i < NF; i++) {if ($i == "netmask") { print $(i+1); next; } }}'


1

With GNU grep, I'd use Perl regex with the -o option (retain only matches): $ ifconfig -a | grep -Po '(?<=\bnetmask )\w*' 0xfffff000 0xff000000 For BSD grep, where we don't have the -P option, we can use awk or cut to get the second part only, as in $ ifconfig -a | grep -o '\bnetmask [^ ]*' | cut -d ' ' -f 2 0xfffff000 0xff000000 If you really want ...


1

User area (uarea) contained kernel stack and some private structures of a process, which are normally not accessed by other processes and not needed when that process blocks (sleeps). These structures occupied an entire page (4KB or sometimes even more depending on the system). Back in the day computers had small memory, so it made sense to group those ...


1

On BSD systems one should always use GNU Make with Makefiles generated by GNU Automake. I see in README.md for the libmaxminddb repository on github.com that one is expected to run the bootstrap script after cloning the repo (which is quite normal, though more often the script is called autogen). If you don't already have GNU Make and the GNU Autotools ...


1

The hint of Mr. Eric Schnoebelen finally brought me to the following work around: Instead of using the hostname (nyftp.netbsd.org) I used the IP address which I looked up using nslookup on my local PC: nslookup nyftp.netbsd.org Server: 127.0.1.1 Address: 127.0.1.1#53 Non-authoritative answer: nyftp.netbsd.org canonical name = netbsd3.cs.columbia....


1

As Google could have told you, this was a mis-feature/bug in the original source: 0000276: magic_descriptor() closes underlying file descriptor (fd) when it finishes You should probably treat this as a known behaviour of magic_descriptor() in all releases of file and libmagic prior to 5.18. I.e. don't expect the descriptor to remain open after that call ...


1

My hunch it that the behavior is a limitation of tied hashes. There seems to be no guarantee that DB_File does not rehash when deleting the most recently fetched key. You also asked about the difference between while (my ($key, $val) = each(%db)) { delete $db{$key}; } and foreach (keys(%db)) { delete $db{$_}; } . In the first case you are ...



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