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33

foreach(NetworkInterface ni in NetworkInterface.GetAllNetworkInterfaces()) { if(ni.NetworkInterfaceType == NetworkInterfaceType.Wireless80211 || ni.NetworkInterfaceType == NetworkInterfaceType.Ethernet) { Console.WriteLine(ni.Name); foreach (UnicastIPAddressInformation ip in ni.GetIPProperties().UnicastAddresses) { if ...


10

On my laptop (running Windows 7, with Virtual Box and it's network interface installed) the following code prints out the name of my wireless interface along with my local address. It uses a brute force approach at the end of the day, but will only try and actually connect to addresses that are considered to be the best candidates. // iterate over the ...


7

GetIsNetworkAvailable returns a result based on the network interfaces available. You should turn off all radios or turn on flight mode to get this to return false. You may also want to check: NetworkInterface.NetworkInterfaceType == NetworkInterfaceType.None In reality though, what you probably want to do is check if you can reach a specific URI. Just ...


5

Take a look at Retrieving Network Interfaces and Listing Network Interface Addresses in the Java Tutorial. If you have several network interfaces which are up and running, you must select programmatically the network interface that your program should use. UPDATE: I've found the question that is similar to yours. See the answer to ...


5

pcap_findalldevs_ex is only present if you define HAVE_REMOTE Add HAVE_REMOTE as a preprocessor definition in project properties, or do the following for every include of pcap.h: #define HAVE_REMOTE #include "pcap.h"


4

I'm going to answer for the Linux side of the house (at least for Debian-based systems, such as Ubuntu, since it's more common for users at this point): Type the following into a command line: route -n You should see your "routing table" appear, with something like the following: Destination Gateway Genmask ... Iface 0.0.0.0 ...


4

the kernel sends information about network interface changes over netlink; see e.g. here for an example http://softengcrunch.blogspot.cz/2010/12/communicating-with-kernel-via-netlink.html A quick and dirty hack would be to do the polling after any netlink event (when select wakes up on the netlink socket), without actually parsing the netlink packet ;)


4

Solved it myself. It was the sin.sin_addr.s_addr that pointed at the senders IP, but it had to be the servers ip! Be careful because it isn´t always easy to see such errors in the code! :-) Now the packets contain correct MAC information. The next problem is why I don´t get any syn-acks from the server, but I will make a new question for that issue.


4

#include <windows.h> #include <iphlpapi.h> #include <stdio.h> #pragma comment(lib, "iphlpapi.lib") int main(int argc, char** argv) { PIP_ADAPTER_INFO pAdapterInfo; pAdapterInfo = (IP_ADAPTER_INFO *) malloc(sizeof(IP_ADAPTER_INFO)); ULONG buflen = sizeof(IP_ADAPTER_INFO); if(GetAdaptersInfo(pAdapterInfo, &buflen) == ...


3

lo = localhost en = ethernet ap = Probably for access point (if you are acting as a wifi host) pdp_ip = maybe PDS data packet? PDS is the Phone Data Service, the data portion of GSM. Since there are four, I might postulate that PDS has the capability to offer four discrete channels.


3

To select a specific network interface (on Linux) for egress traffic you can use: setsockopt(sock, SOL_SOCKET, SO_BINDTODEVICE, device, sizeof(device)); Links with sample code snippet http://codingrelic.geekhold.com/2009/10/code-snippet-sobindtodevice.html More information Problems with SO_BINDTODEVICE Linux socket option


3

Yes, manipulating /etc/network/interfaces is the way to accomplish that (just store the backup in case things go wrong). Also, if interfaces are managed by network manager (which is rarely the case for servers, but happens on the desktop), you may manipulate it via dbus calls, I think. You should've mentioned distribution, btw, not the language — if you ...


3

Toggle a flag: #!/bin/bash for ((i = 1, flag = 0; i <= 80; i++)) do if ((flag ^= 1)) then ifconfig veth1 down # odd else ifconfig veth1 up fi sleep 1 done


3

COUNT=40 for n in $(seq -w 1 $COUNT); do ifconfig veth1 down sleep 1 ifconfig veth1 up sleep 1 done Or if you really want to count to 80: COUNT=80 for n in $(seq -w 1 $COUNT); do case $n in *[13579]) ifconfig veth1 down ;; *) ifconfig veth1 up ;; esac sleep 1 done


3

Use socket bindto and enter the IP of your eth0:2 See Example #2 on this page: http://framework.zend.com/manual/en/zend.http.client.adapters.html


3

I know this isn't much of an answer, but here's a tutorial that details Programmatic Access to Network Parameters. That being said, it may also be useful to consult the NetworkInterface API. Within the tutorial, there's a few working examples that will shed more light on the subject.


3

Not yet a complete solution, but if you were using only simple socket objects, you could do what you need this way : import socket s = socket.socket() s.bind(("127.0.0.1", 0)) # replace "127.0.0.1" by the local IP of the interface to use s.connect(("remote_server.com", 80)) Thus, you will force the system to bind the socket to the wanted network ...


2

If you use Twisted's twisted.web.client.Agent, then you can achieve this via: from twisted.internet import reactor from twisted.web.client import Agent agent = Agent(reactor, bindAddress=("10.0.0.1", 0)) And then using agent in the usual way.


2

$ sudo pip install netifaces $ python Python 2.6.1 (r261:67515, Jun 24 2010, 21:47:49) [GCC 4.2.1 (Apple Inc. build 5646)] on darwin Type "help", "copyright", "credits" or "license" for more information. import netifaces netifaces.ifaddresses('en0') {18: [{'addr': '10:9a:dd:52:89:dc'}], 2: [{'broadcast': ...


2

The short answer is no, there isn't. The dhcp client sets the interface address etc. using the same mechanisms that ifconfig uses. There is no special flag or other indication that it leaves to tell you that the interface was dynamically configured. I'd check the config files in /etc/ rather than the leases, but yes, you're going to have to do something ...


2

Read /etc/rc.conf. Look for lines starting with ifconfig and see which of those contain the text DHCP. This will not catch interfaces that were re-configured by running dhclient manually. Parsing the leases file would work better in that respect, assuming its permessions allow your program to read it.


2

Yes you can. See the manual page for route(4).


2

Ok so I figured out how to do this on Windows XP and Windows 7: The string (eg: myexample.com) contained in the Connection-specific DNS Suffix field of each network interface listed in the output of ipconfig /all can be found in the registry at HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Services\Tcpip\Parameters\Interfaces{GUID} (where GUID is the GUID of ...


2

getsockname(2) followed by getnameinfo(3) reports the IP address that your TCP/IP stack has assigned to the socket. (Obviously, this won't match what the client could use if server and client are on opposite sides of a NAT system; in that case, perhaps there is clever UPnP trickery to discover the IP address that the client could use to contact the server.) ...


2

Windows defines many interfaces for internal use. Java just returns what the OS tell gives it, none of these are added by Java. You should be able to find entries for all these devices in the Windows Registry.


2

use % operator. like the following, replace the echo with the commands you want count=0 while [ $count -lt 80 ] do if (( $count % 2 == 0 )) then echo 'aaa' else echo 'bbb' fi count=$(( $count + 1 )) done


2

You can get all of that information through the struct net_device one way or another. As Albert Veli said, you can get this struct net_device pointer using __dev_get_by_name(). If you tell us what information you need specifically we might even be able to point you to the correct fields. Finding the MAC address is fairly simple: struct net_device *dev = ...


2

The feature you're asking about is a routing table, a list of destinations known to the host. When the OS needs to forward a packet it checks this list and chooses the most appropriate one (from specific destinations to general ones). For example: 192.0.2.0/28 - 192.0.2.1 via eth1 198.51.100.0/27 - 198.51.100.1 via eth0 0.0.0.0/0 - 203.0.113.1 ...


2

So a useful statistic here is the total received bytes on a given interface. NetworkInterface.GetIPv4Statistics().BytesReceived Using this in conjunction with: NetworkInterface.OperationalStatus Can tell you if it is currently "Up" and if it has received packets in the past. In the case of wireless the OperationalStatus is "Down" if it is not ...



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