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As Visual Vincent said, "MICS" is followed by 0x10 and then 0x00, so if you treat that part of the packet as a null-terminated string, it's "MICS\x10". As you've discovered, you have to look at the raw bytes to find the data after it. The data before it is the UDP header, the IP header, and the Ethernet header. You don't get those headers when reading ...


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I'm sure you've googled a lot, but just for the sake of adding info (since I can't comment yet :() I think you will have to find a way to generate a SPL file, send the SPL file to the workstation, and prompt the workstation to print it. To generate a SPL File: You might check this out... I know you don't want to install anything on the workstations, but ...


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Looks like another program like NetworkManager takes care of configuring your network device. So if you want to configure it manually, you can set your device to unmanaged state in NetworkManager to prevent it overwriting your network settings. If you don't have other network devices you also can disable the NetworkManager service or remove it completely ...


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A high request_time may be due to a client with a slow connection, which is out of your control. It does not necessarily represent the performance of your server and/or application. You really should not rely on request_time when profiling but instead measure things like the application's response time (ie. upstream_response_time). Thus said, there are ...


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you can handle those errors kindly go through the below code .. :) - (void)requestFinished:(ASIHTTPRequest *)request { NSString *str = [request responseString]; NSLog(@"%@",str); NSMutableDictionary *dictjson = [str JSONValue]; NSInteger iStatus = [[dictjson objectForKey:@"status"] integerValue]; if (iStatus == 200) { // ...



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