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This should work: S.todense()[0, 0] todense() returns np.matrix, you also could use .A to return annp.array. In this case: S.A[0][0] Would work, but S.A[0,0] is still preferred.


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Just add a print statement to your last line: for u, v, p in preds: print '(%d, %d) -> %.8f' % (u, v, p)


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It looks like the easiest way to do this is to tell gunicorn to preload your application using the preload_app option. This assumes that you can load the data structure as a module-level variable: from flask import Flask from your.application import CustomDataStructure CUSTOM_DATA_STRUCTURE = CustomDataStructure('/data/lives/here') # @app.routes, etc. ...


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You can also try Graphviz via PyDot (I prefer this one) or PyGraphviz. In case you are interested in a publication-ready result, you can use the toolchain networkx -> pydot + dot -> dot2tex + dot -> dot2texi.sty -> TikZ. Instead of this fragile toolchain, you can alternatively export directly to TikZ with nx2tikz (I've written it, so I'm biased) and use the ...


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I'm not positive what your question is. I think you're asking "how do I get networkx to put some nodes close together" Before I launch into the answer, the drawing documentation for networkx is here: http://networkx.lanl.gov/reference/drawing.html So that figure you're asking about has 4 different communities that are clustered based on having lots of ...


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So networkx doesn't make it particularly easy to use the graphviz layout if you don't have graphviz because it's a better idea to use graphviz's algorithm if you're trying to reproduce graphviz's layout. But, if you're willing to put in the effort to calculate the position for each node this is straightforward (as you guessed). Create a dict saying where ...


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(for those who aren't aware the numpy floyd-warshall algorithm is available in networkx) The networkx description of floyd_warshall_numpy states: Floyd’s algorithm is appropriate for finding shortest paths in dense graphs or graphs with negative weights when Dijkstra’s algorithm fails. This algorithm can still fail if there are negative cycles. It has ...


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If your graph isn't too big you could try the following approach that sets the properties for individual nodes and edges. The trick is to save the output of the drawing functions which gives you a handle to the object properties like color, transparency, and visibility. import networkx as nx import matplotlib.pyplot as plt G = nx.cycle_graph(12) pos = ...


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I'm definitely not an expert on this, but take a look at https://pypi.python.org/pypi/matplotlib-venn. There's some discussion of this at Python Matplotlib Venn diagram. Here's a blog post about it: http://fouryears.eu/2012/10/13/venn-diagrams-in-python/ These all deal with a matplotlib extension doing Venn Diagrams. The first link is where you go to ...



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