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You can use : import networkx as nx nx.write_gml(G,"test.gml") to save your graph and G = nx.read_gml("test.gml") to retrieve it To go further you can use Neo4J/Titan which are very good java graph databases. You can access them in Python with Bulbs : https://github.com/espeed/bulbs You can also try GrapheekDB : ...


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As I understand your question, you're trying to find the lowest weight connected component that contains a set of nodes. This is the Steiner tree in graphs problem. It is NP complete. You're probably best off taking some sort of heuristic based on the specific case you are studying. For two nodes, the approach to do this is Dijkstra's algorithm- it's ...


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I think you're after this one-liner: G= nx.k_core(G,k=2) You should be aware that if you delete some nodes, you'll have new nodes whose degree is just 1 or 0. If you want to repeat this process until no such nodes exist, you're generating the "k-core" with k=2. That is you're generating the largest network for which all nodes have degree at least 2. ...


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Iterating on a Graph g yields all of g's nodes, one at a time -- I believe you can't alter g during the iteration itself, but you can selectively make a list of nodes to be deleted, then remove them all: to_del = [n for n in g if g.degree(n) <= 1] g.remove_nodes_from(to_del)


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It was resolved with label_pos=0.2


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Combining both network graphs should do it using NetworkX. Make generous use of the add_edges_from() method instead of add_nodes_from() so you don't overwrite existing nodes with the same name from the previous graph. This should work unless you have a different idea of what "identical" meant to you. Also if you could, post up code to let us know how this ...


1

So for the positioning, you've set pos based on spring_layout. pos gives the positions of your nodes. Check it out - once you've defined it, ask python to print pos for you and see what it's doing. Here's an alternative code: import networkx as nx import pylab as py blue_edges = [('B', 'C'), ('B', 'D'), ('B', 'E'), ('E', 'F')] red_edges = [('A', 'B'), ...


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The reason for this is that the graph stores the node by its name. If it enters one node by name 3 and thinks bipartite=1, say and then later adds 3 again, it interprets that as the same node. If this time you tell it bipartite=0, it will overwrite the old entry. So now, node 3 has bipartite=0. If you want to store two different node 3's, then they will ...


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I find it takes a bit of tweaking to get Matplotlib to produce precise proportions. Usually it involves doing some simple calculations to figure out the ratios that you want (e.g. you want the height of each subplot to be 1.25 its width, by your measurements). As for the PDF not respecting the figure size, it might be because you are specifying the DPI. ...


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It sounds like you want to discover the cliques in your graph. For this you could use nx.clique.find_cliques(): >>> list(nx.clique.find_cliques(G)) [[1, 2, 3], [1, 2, 4], [1, 5], [6, 5, 7]] nx.clique.find_cliques() returns a generator which will yield all cliques in the graph. You can filter out the cliques with fewer than three nodes using list ...


2

Read the data in as a csv into a pandas df: df = pd.read_csv(path_to_edge_list, sep='\s+', header=None, names=['Node1','Node2','Weight']) Now create a nx DiGraph and perform a list comprehension to generate a list of tuples with (node1, node2, weight) as the data: In [150]: import networkx as nx G = nx.DiGraph() G.add_weighted_edges_from([tuple(x) for x ...


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Why not flatten the list of edge tuples (each 2 nodes), and then take the set of nodes to ensure uniqueness? list(set(sum(list(nx.algorithms.bfs_tree(G, 0).edges()), ()))) In your hypothetical solution, you would ignore the 0 node, and it would not be included in your output. Or you could use the bfs_successors() method to get a dict of nodes (passing ...


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If you only want to consider some subset of vertices for source and target, you might do something like: # Change these to fit your needs sources = G.nodes() # For example, sources = [0,1,4] targets = G.nodes() max_shortest_path = None for (s,t) in itertools.product(sources, targets): if s == t: continue # Ignore shortest_paths = ...


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I think you want the graph diameter which is the maximum of all-pairs shortest paths. https://networkx.github.io/documentation/latest/reference/generated/networkx.algorithms.distance_measures.diameter.html


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Here are a couple more ideas to add to what @marcus-müller wrote. For average degree (note for your digraph this is the sum of in and out degrees) In [1]: import networkx as nx G In [2]: G = nx.DiGraph() In [3]: G.add_edge(1,2,weight=7) In [4]: G.add_edge(3,4,weight=17) In [5]: sum(G.degree().values())/float(len(G)) Out[5]: 1.0 In [6]: ...


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(i) The Average degree of the network. (The only one I could find was average_degree_connectivity, which returns a dictionary and not a single float with the average degree of the whole network) Assuming your Graph object is G. degrees = G.degree() sum_of_edges = sum(degrees.values()) Calculating the average is just a matter of division by the ...


3

An ordered graph data structure is available in NetworkX since inclusion on Jan 1 2015. The OrderedGraph class will output nodes and edges from the NetworkX data structure in the order they are added. You'll need to get the latest development version at https://github.com/networkx/networkx/ for the following to work. import networkx as nx outerdict = ...


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You don't need to solve this, the algorithm is already implemented in python in the community package. You can have a look at how they made it in the source code. If you do have to implement it yourself for an assignment, try to avoid the bad habit of going on stack overflow, you learn more by finding by yourself ;)


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Do not have access to the link you provided. (I was intended to comment, but I cannot add comment at this point)


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import numpy as np import matplotlib.pyplot as plt import networkx as nx Z = [[0, 1, 1, 1, 1, 0, 1, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0], [1, 0, 0, 0, 1, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0], [1, 1, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0], [1, 0, 1, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0], [1, 0, 0, 1, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0], [1, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 1, 0, 1, 0, 0, ...


2

There is probably a more concise way, but this works. The main trick is just to normalize the data such that User1 is always the lower number ID. Then you can use groupby since 11,12 and 12,11 are now recognized as representing the same thing. In [330]: df = pd.DataFrame({"User1":[11,12,13,14],"User2":[12,11,14,13],"W":[1,2,1,2]}) In [331]: df['U1'] = ...


1

When I encountered a similar problem to yours, I went the chicken way out and simply used the BA generator with varying number of links for new nodes being added, e.g., 1,..., 5. This guarantees a single connected component and no parallel edges. Since you want fixed power-law exponents, I suggest the following: Typically, in cascading failures two ...


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You might like connected_component_subgraphs() better since it will give you subgraphs instead of just the nodes. In [1]: import networkx as nx In [2]: G = nx.Graph() In [3]: G.add_path([1,2,3,4]) In [4]: G.add_path([10,20,30,40]) In [5]: components = nx.connected_component_subgraphs(G) In [6]: components Out[6]: [<networkx.classes.graph.Graph at ...


1

Here is how to draw just the number for a 'weight' attribute. import matplotlib.pyplot as plt import networkx as nx G = nx.Graph() G.add_edge(1,2,weight=7) G.add_edge(2,3,weight=42) labels = {} for u,v,data in G.edges(data=True): labels[(u,v)] = data['weight'] pos = nx.spring_layout(G) nx.draw(G,pos) nx.draw_networkx_edge_labels(G, pos, ...


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If you want to have 'n' as an edge label, you must use the parameter 'edge_labels' with draw_networkx_edge_labels, instead of 'labels'. nx.draw_networkx_edge_labels(G, pos, edge_labels = edgelabels)


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Assign the x and y values to the a dictionary with node keys In [1]: pos = {} In [2]: for n,data in G.node.items(): ...: pos[n] = (data['x'],data['y']) ...:


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This isn't a great answer, but it gives the basics. Someone else may come by who actually knows the Fruchterman-Reingold algorithm and can describe it. I'm giving an explanation based on what I can find in the code. From the documentation, weight : string or None optional (default=’weight’) The edge attribute that holds the numerical value used ...


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First a question - is there a reason you don't want isolated nodes or multiple connected components? In principle, a true "random" power-law graph will have these. So a few comments: 1) If you use the expected_degree_graph, you're going to have a very hard time eliminating isolated nodes. This is because there are many nodes with an expected degree of ...


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Here is an example of how to use a colormap. It's a little tricky. And if you want a customized discrete colormap you can try this SO answer Matplotlib discrete colorbar import matplotlib.pyplot as plt # create number for each group to allow use of colormap from itertools import count # get unique groups groups = ...


1

You are right, GraphML want's simpler attributes (no numpy arrays or lists). You can set the x and y positions of the nodes as attributes like this G = nx.path_graph(4) pos = nx.spring_layout(G) for node,(x,y) in pos.items(): G.node[node]['x'] = float(x) G.node[node]['y'] = float(y) nx.write_graphml(G, "g.graphml")


0

In your comment you say this started happening after you started adding edges. I think that's where the problem is. You'll get this error if even one node doesn't have the 'category' defined. I think adding edges is resulting in the addition of a few nodes that don't have category defined. The first test is to just go through for node in G.nodes(): ...


0

You can do it this way without the CSV writer. with open('some_file.csv', 'wb') as f: for n in G: f.write("%s %f %f\n"%(n,betweenness_centr[n],eigenvector_centr[n])) $ cat some_file.csv 1 0.000000 0.455318 2 0.800000 0.628284 3 0.000000 0.455318 4 0.000000 0.134714 5 0.000000 0.263998 6 0.400000 0.320604 Follow up: tab is \t and you can ...


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Matplotlib wants Python unicode (for Python2). So you can use labels = {1:'King Bolaños'.decode('utf-8'), 2:'Lancelot', 3:'shopkeeper', 4:'dead parrot', 5:'Brian', 6:'Sir Robin'}


2

Just add with_labels=True to your code. import matplotlib.pyplot as plt import networkx as nx socialNetworl = nx.Graph() socialNetworl.add_nodes_from([1,2,3,4,5,6]) socialNetworl.add_edges_from([(1,2),(1,3),(2,3),(2,5),(2,6)]) nx.draw(socialNetworl, node_size = 800, node_color="cyan", with_labels = True) plt.show() If you want to change the labels, ...


3

You can draw the node labels separately with nx.draw_networkx_labels (and control lots of other label options too). For example, after adding the nodes and edges, you could write: pos=nx.spring_layout(socialNetworl) nx.draw(socialNetworl, pos=pos, node_size = 800, node_color="cyan") nx.draw_networkx_labels(socialNetworl, pos=pos); plt.show() Which draws: ...


3

You can use the methods/functions add_nodes_from() and add_edges_from() found here and here from the standard undirected graph class of NetworkX. This way you can create your graph step by step as the data flow comes. All you have to do is to convert the data into the correct format and pass it "line by line" into the two functions. They will only add nodes ...


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As this is old and Lack answered the question in the comments I am copying his answer here and accepting: I can't run your code without errors (TypeError: 'complex' object has no attribute '__getitem__' on j[t]) but it's the same problem as your other question which I answered (stackoverflow.com/questions/27831022/…). Because you pass only one node at a ...


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In the code below I create a graph. Then I get the distances of each node from that graph. Then I invert that so that instead for each distance I have a list of nodes at that distance. Then for each distance I plot the nodes with a given color. Note that if there is an unreachable node, it won't get plotted. If such nodes exist you need to decide what ...


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Use parens not square brackets, range is a function: for k in range(0,3): # <- correct for k in range[0,3]: # < wrong



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