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1

Something like this should work. Find out whether edge exists and if it does update the weights default_weight = W G = nx.Graph() for nodes in node_list: n0 = nodes[0] n1 = nodes[1] if G.has_edge(n0,n1): G[n0][n1]['weight'] += default_weight else: G.add_edge(n0,n1, weight=default_weight)


0

Based on a little research and the advice of Joel, I've come up with this method. I want to post it here so that anyone who has the will can propose improvements. For a regular 3x3 network, this is how we can obtain the adjacency matrix in a righteous way: #Create the graph (see question above) A=nx.adjacency_matrix(G, nodelist=range(N*N)) A=A.todense() ...


3

Networkx doesn't know what order you want the nodes to be in. Here is how to call it: adjacency_matrix(G, nodelist=None, weight='weight'). If you want a specific order, set nodelist to be a list in that order. So for example adjacency_matrix(G, nodelist=range(9)) should get what you want. Why is this? Well, because a graph can have just about anything as ...


3

Try G.remove_edges_from(G.edges(0)) which will remove all of the edges of 0 rather than the entire node. Then generate the adjacency matrix.


0

I had a similar problem (using 3.5) and lost 1/2 a day to it but here is a something that works - I am retired and just learning Python so I can help my grandson (12) with it. mydict2={'Atlanta':78,'Macon':85,'Savannah':72} maxval=(max(mydict2.values())) print(maxval) mykey=[key for key,value in mydict2.items()if value==maxval][0] print(mykey) YEILDS; 85 ...


0

You can use the adjacency matrix. Then you can normalise it so that the sum of rows equals 1 and each row is the probability distribution of the node jumping to another node. You can also have a jump probability if the walker jumps to a random node. M = nx.adjacency_matrix(g) #obtain the adj. matrix for the graph #normalise the adjacency matrix for i in ...


1

In [543]: A=np.arange(9).reshape(3,3) For an array, trace can be called as function or method. In fact, np.trace delegates the action to A.trace. In [544]: np.trace(A) Out[544]: 12 In [545]: A.trace() Out[545]: 12 In [546]: M=sparse.csr_matrix(A) In general calling a numpy function on a sparse matrix does not work - unless the matrix has a matching ...


2

Don't use a matrix. networkx has the nodes_with_selfloops method to list nodes with a self-loop: >>> import networkx >>> G = networkx.Graph() >>> G.add_node(1) >>> G.add_node(2) >>> G.add_node(3) >>> G.add_edge(2, 2) >>> G.add_edge(1, 3) >>> G.nodes_with_selfloops() [2] If you graph ...


0

I am not familiar with viz.js but if it's not a hard requirement I suggest you export your graph to GEXF: G = nx.path_graph(4) # your graph here nx.write_gexf(G, "test.gexf") And then import it into Sigma.js, a dedicated high performance graph drawing library, using the dedicated GEXF importer plugin.


1

I think you're misunderstanding what G[maxIndex] does. It will actually give you the out-edges of node maxIndex and then getting the in-edges from that bunch of nodes. If you simply want the in-edges of a given node you can do G.in_edges(maxIndex, data=True). Like so: G = nx.DiGraph() G.add_weighted_edges_from([(2, 1, 3.0), (3,1, 5.0), (4, 1, -1.0), (4, 2, ...


1

If you just want one pair of nodes, there is no reason to make a list. Just find the pair! while True: u, v = random.sample(G.nodes(), 2) if not (G.has_edge(u, v) or G.has_edge(v, u)): break Now use u and v directly.


0

You are correct about the cause of the problem. To fix it, you need to define vmin and vmax. I believe nx.draw(G, node_color=[0.9,1.,1.,1.], vmin=0, vmax=1) will do what you're after (I would need to know what colormap you're using to be sure). For edges, there are similar parameters: edge_vmin and edge_vmax.


0

You can store the positions as node attributes and they will persist through the relabeling. Use networkx.set_node_attributes() and networkx.get_node_attributes() as follows import networkx as nx import matplotlib.pyplot as plt start = 0 end = 7 G = nx.grid_2d_graph(3,3) pos = dict(zip(G,G)) # dictionary of node names->positions ...


-1

You need to write the algorithm for DFS(depth first search) or BFS(Breadth first search) to collect all paths. below is the example to collect all possible paths from source to destination written in java. package com.nirav.modi; import java.util.ArrayList; import java.util.Collections; import java.util.HashMap; import ...


2

A lib2to3 import snuck into networkx-1.10 and networkx-1.11 which is the latest release. Try the development release from the github site. (That will soon be networkx-2.0). The lib2to3 library import has been removed since the networkx-1.11 release. github.com/networkx/networkx/archive/master.zip


0

Well I know its probably not what you're looking for, but I was facing a similar problem where I wanted to have a directed graph where the edge between two nodes had a different weight depending on the direction (whether it was going into or out of the node) and the work around I did was I used a different color for each edge and decreased the opacity for ...


2

Just do the calculations for each connected component. The test to see if there isn't a path between two nodes can be expensive. connected_components = nx.connected_component_subgraphs(G) for component in connected_components: #your code here.


0

you can use error handling in python for this. try: nx.bidirectional_dijkstra(F, n, j) except NetworkXNoPath: # do whatever you want you can use this link for more help


0

I am afraid you will need a for loop in any case but it's not that slow. Networkx is actually quite slow in general because of the way it stores nodes and edges (as dict). If you want to apply functions to some attributes using numpy I suggest you try graph-tool instead. Concerning the issue at hand, I think I have a better way: import networkx as nx ...


0

Try using the map or imap method of the Pool class of the multiprocessing library. https://docs.python.org/2/library/multiprocessing.html You can then create a function which checks and adds the edges and get imap to execute your function for each element in parallel. Check the example at the bottom of this link: ...


0

As you found, the package is not removed. It still exists in networkx. There is an example on how to use it at the link you provided http://networkx.readthedocs.io/en/latest/reference/generated/networkx.readwrite.json_graph.node_link_data.html#networkx.readwrite.json_graph.node_link_data


0

NetworkX only use weight as an attribute of edges. Whether there is an edge or not doesn't depend on edges' weights. In other word, Those edges with weight 0 are also count as edges and it will be displayed by drawing function.


1

Your my_shortest_paths is actually a list and by my_shortest_paths[n] for n in nodes, you are using node's name as the index of your list, which caused your problem. I think you can just use n_color = numpy.asarray([num_short_paths[n] for n in nodes]) instead.


1

This might due to you are working on a directed network. In directed networks, it is possible to have no neighbors for a non isolated nodes. For example, with 2 nodes a,b and one edge from a to b. Neither a nor b is isolated, a will have neighbor b, but b has no neighbor. NetworkX defines isolated as no incoming and no outgoing edges but neighbors are not ...


0

Based on the answer I have been given here, I tried to do exactly the same thing. My attempt revolved around the use of the nx.all_shortest_paths(G,source,target) function, which produces a generator: counts={} for n in G.nodes(): counts[n]=0 for n in G.nodes(): for j in G.nodes(): if (n!=j): ...


1

What you seek to compute is the unnormalized betweenness centrality. From Wikipedia: The betweenness centrality is an indicator of a node's centrality in a network. It is equal to the number of shortest paths from all vertices to all others that pass through that node. More generally, I suggest you have a look at all the standard measures of ...


2

I would suggest making a dict mapping each node to 0 counts = {} for n in G.nodes(): counts[n] = 0 and then for each path you find -- you're already finding and printing them all -- iterate through the vertices on the path incrementing the appropriate values in your dict: # ... for p in gener: print(p) for v in p: counts[v] += 1


1

You can use a slightly more consistent layout, maybe shell_layout() or circular_layout(). Technically, in a generic abstract graph, the depicted location has no real meaning, and each of these functions tends to have a little variance each time you call it as a reflection of that fact. They simply place nodes in a reasonable fashion according to some ...


0

A (admittedly optimizable) version of what you're looking for, i believe could look something like this. percentSpread = #integer representing percent chance of cold to spread percentBetter = #chance someone who has the cold gets better cold = #some node in your graph we'll call office, the first guy sick sickness = [] #the array that keeps track of the ...


0

I've seen this before and it is befuddling. It's not been directly resolved, but if you really need to use tkinter to have a separate parent GUI, the only fix I've seen is to use another displaying solution. Matplotlib's pyplot works well with networkx, and a tkinter menu can spawn the display with no issues.


1

You have a typo in your call to nx.draw(). This typo was not caught by the interpreter since you can pass whatever keyword arguments you want to the function, its just that certain keywords get acted on/are of use.


0

Two potential avenues. One is to use a better layout function, maybe shell_layout() or circular_layout(). The other is to understand the structure the layout functions produce and use your understanding of the data to produce a more sensible visualization. These functions produce a dictionary keyed on the nodes with values that are lists of length 2. The ...


0

The ValueError you see is coming from numpy.random.randint which gives that error when the 'low' and 'high' inputs are not ordered correctly. It is hard to see why you are getting the error. Presumably the choice function is calling randint with arguments based on features of your input Neighbs. I would start by printing values of Neighbs just before that ...


0

I think it's correct, cause the average degree is reasonably higher than indegree and outdegree. So if you treat the graph as undirected in the Erdős–Rényi model you should have something like average degree/2. So it will generate a random graph with around the same number of edges of your real graph.



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