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0

The easy solution I tried Download date.js from http://datejs.com/ Include in your file then var date = Date.parse('1970-01-12 00:00:00'); var formattedDate = date.toString('yyyy-MM-dd');


1

How about StreamWriter class? Read more here... And do not forget about exception handling e.g missing file permissions etc.


0

You should use StreamWriter. Its nice and simple. For example: using System.IO; //for StreamWriter namespace ConsoleApplication2 { class Program { static void Main(string[] args) { StreamWriter myStreamWriter = new StreamWriter(@"myLines.txt");//located in bin/debug ...


3

We must discriminate between three cases, (1) local variables, (2) (non-static) fields inside structs, and (3) fields inside classes. For local variables, that is variables declared inside a method (or inside a constructor, or property/indexer/event accessor), the two are not equivalent: class C { void M() { Foo fooInstance = new Foo(); // ...


0

The first snippet Foo fooInstance = new Foo(); will, as has been said, create a new instance of Foo and place a reference to it in the variable fooInstance. For the second snippet Foo fooInstance; it depends on where it is placed: public class MyClass { Foo m_foo = null; // member, the "= null" part is redundant and not needed Foo ...


1

If you use Foo fooInstance; ...in C#, you're just creating a reference variable on stack which points to nothing; no default constructor is called (like it would be in C++).


0

Snippet 2 is simply declaring the reference. You haven't instantiated the object yet. If you tried to access the reference in Snippet 2 you would get a compiler error saying the value hasn't been initialized. This is different from C++ where Snippet 2 would declare a constructed object on the stack.


2

The Second Creates Object of type Foo points to null in memeroy. The First points to new object using default constructor. If you use the second and say fooInstance.SomeProperty = something. This will throw an exception as fooInstance points to null.


6

Assuming Foo is a reference type like a class, the second code snippet basically just allocates a pointer. The equivalent C++ code would be Foo* fooInstance; Your snippets one and two are simply not equivalent.


0

You can create object by new kewords .. suppose we have one person class class Person { public void walk() { System.out.println("Walk method"); } } class Demo { public void static void main(String Jitendra[]) { //how to create object .. Person p=new Person(); // p is our object of person class ...


4

The line X* ptr = new (&p) X; uses placement new to construct a new object of type X at the location pointed at by &p. This causes undefined behavior in this particular context because p already has an object at its position (unless X is trivially copyable and destructible). It then returns a pointer to the object, which will be at the same ...


0

As above, no raw pointers are never automatically deleted. This is why we don't use raw pointers for controlling lifetimes. We use smart pointers. Here's your code snippet written correctly in modern c++: std::unique_ptr<int> foo() { return std::unique_ptr<int>(new int(3)); // or std::make_unique<int>(3) for c++14 // ...


0

This is a bad practice to allocate dynamically from within a function and depend on the mercy of some other function to deallocate. Ideally, the caller should allocate space, pass that to the calling function and caller would deallocate when not in use. void foo(int * a) { // a is pre-allocated by caller *a = 3; }//function ends -- caller takes care ...


0

No, it is your responsibility to procure deallocation: int *i = new int; delete i; However, the above code will sooner or later evolve into something that is almost impossible to make exception-safe. Better do not use pointers at all, or if you really must, use a smart pointer which will free the memory for you at the right moment: ...


7

No it certainly does not. Every new has to be balanced with a delete. (And, to avoid any future doubt, any new[] has to be balanced with a delete[]). There are constructs in C++ that will allow the effective release of memory once a container object has gone out of scope. Have a look at std::shared_ptr and std::unique_ptr.


2

No, the memory is not deallocated. You should deallocate it manually with delete a; In languages like Java or C# there is a so called Garbage Collector that handles memory deallocation when it finds out that some data is not longer needed. Garbage Collection can be used with C++, but it's not standard and in practice rarely used. There are, however, other ...


1

Well you throw the exception again, and something else handles it. Don't do that. By the sounds of your question, you don't even want to throw an exception, but simply return NULL; and check the pointer like you've done already.


3

Actually, the Java Language Specification does not call new an operator. It writes: 38 tokens, formed from ASCII characters, are the operators. Operator: = > < ! ~ ? : -> == >= <= != && || ++ -- + - * / & | ^ % << >> >>> += -= *= /= &= |= ...


3

Officially new is not an operator. There is no such word in the Java Language Specification, which is the sole authority in this matter. There is the class instance creation expression, which involves the keyword new.


1

This code works fine (tested with MSVC from VS2010) and always returns nullptr for X allocation, as requested in your question: #include <iostream> using namespace std; class X { public: X() { cout << "X::X()" << endl; } static void* operator new(size_t size) { return nullptr; } }; int main() { X* px = new X(); ...


1

new is indeed an operator. It is a reserved keyword in Java, so you can't override it like you can override methods. It operates on class names - for a given class name it returns a new instance of the class. It's like the unary - (minus) operator which takes an integer and returns another integer (one with opposite sign), only that for new, the input and ...


1

It's an operator, isn't it? You could create instances like this: A some = A.new(); // This wouldn't be an operator but just a built-in method Or instead of new it could be + A some = +A(); But in Java and other popular languages, they decided to implement an operator to create instances of classes and this was the so-called new operator.


0

I am not at all sure I understand what you want, but something like this may be it. You can't have an __init__ with this technique, because if you do, it will be called regardless of whether __new__ returned a new object. class A(object): def __new__(cls, obj): if isinstance(obj, cls): return obj rv = object.__new__(cls) ...


1

Because all objects are added to the object tree, they are deleted automatically. E.g. all widgets are added to the layout, and the layout itself is set in the window. This creates a tree of objects. You can use the method QObject::dumpObjectTree() to get a visual representation of the current tree of objects. See also Object Trees & Ownership in the ...


6

(Just to supplement other answers, and comments by myself.) When one uses new, the class (or struct, or interface) will have two same-looking members, one inherited from a base type, and one declared by the type itself. Avoid that! Important: Just because you say new, you will not "remove" the old member. It is still there, and can easily be called. The ...


2

The type of the object is A, but ref2 does not access the version of Y() that is defined in the B class because that method is declared with the new modifier, not the override modifier. As a result, a ref2 object displays the same description as an A object.


22

In C#, methods are not virtual by default (unlike Java). Therefore, ref2.Y() method call is not polymorphic. To benefit from the polymorphism, you should mark A.Y() method as virtual, and B.Y() method as override. What new modifier does is simply hiding a member that is inherited from a base class. That's what really happens in your Main() method: A ref1 ...


1

if you are using c++ then try to use new/delete instead of malloc/calloc as they are operator its self compared to malloc/calloc for them you used to include another header for that.so don't mix two different languages in single coding.their work is similar in every manner both allocates the memory dynamically from heap segment in hash table.


1

It's because the forEach manages the scope for the variables for you and whereas for does not. For example, var arr = [1,2,3]; for (var i=0;i<arr.length;i++){ var r = 100; } console.log(r); //prints 100 arr.forEach(function(){ var w = 100; }); console.log(w); //prints "w is not defined" so in your case, the part_top, part_left variables exists ...


0

Using forEach() method instead of for loop worked for me. Although I am not sure, why Our closest explanation is that since forEach() accepts an anonymous function, it binds the scope of variables into a closure when the new operator is invoked. ... if (noun.skin !== 'Undefined'){ var animalParts = ['skin', 'eyes', 'mouth']; ...


0

A short breakdown of errors you purposely committed: int main() { int* nir = new int; // allocating dynamic memory *nir = 7; // assigning value cout << *nir << endl; delete nir; // deleting nir = 0; // **is this line for assigning the address nir=0? 0 is also part of memory right? Why didn't we put NULL? The previous ...


0

You tagged c++ so I recommend using nullptr instead of 0/NULL nir = nullptr; The problem The literal 0 (which is essentially of type int) also serves as a null pointer literal in C++. This kludge results in ambiguity and bugs. Solution Use the nullptr keyword instead of 0 to indicate a null pointer value source


0

This code snippet is wrong nir=0; //**is this line for assigning the address nir=0? 0 is also part of memory right? Why didn't we put NULL? *nir=8; //**can i do like this and change the value, so that the output can be 8 now? cout<<*nir<<endl; delete nir; nir=0; You did not allocate memory and are trying to write to address 0. *nir=8; ...


0

nir=0; This sets the pointer to NULL. 0 and NULL are the same in this context. *nir=8 This is wrong as nir in not a valid pointer. It's no suprise that it crashes! cout<<*nir<<endl; This is also wrong as nir is invalid pointer. You cannot read or write. delete nir; This is harmless, as deleting a NULL pointer is safe (it does nothing).


0

Initialising objects in the class body works well when the initialization value is available and the initialization can be put on one line. However, this form of initialization has limitations because of its simplicity. If initialization requires some logic (for example, error handling or a for loop to fill a complex array), simple assignment is ...


1

Both these samples of code will execute the same way. Java first calls all the iniline initializers, and then the constructor. Personally, I prefer having all the relevant code in the constructor, where I can see it in a single glance. Additionally, having all the code in the constructor and not inline gives me the freedom of initializing the members in ...


0

A typical use of static keyword inside a class is a counter of created instances of that class. public class Agent{ private static int numberAgent; private String birthdate; private int birthyear; private int birthmonth; ... } And in the constructors of the class, you do numberAgent++; As the static variable of a ...


0

I took @Patrick idea and did it big time! Generic support for 100 params. I cannot copy the source code as it's against the licens... But You can read it on github.


0

Alternate Solution Declaring 2D array using std::vector instead of raw pointer n x n matrix: std::vector<std::vector<int> > triangle( n, std::vector<int>(n, 0) ); row x col matrix std::vector<std::vector<int> > triangle( row, std::vector<int>(col, 0) ); Note: Both the 2d arrays using std::vector are initialized ...


3

int constructor(int n) { int** triangle = new int*[n + 1]; for(int i = 0; i <= n; ++i) triangle[i] = new int[i + 1]; }


1

When you do this: Ninja n; you allocate the Ninja on the stack and this Enemy * enemy = &n; gets a pointer to that location. Once you leave the current function, the memory in the stack is reused and your Ninja* will be dangling: if you try to access it (dereference) your program will crash or worse. When you do this: Enemy * enemy = new Ninja; ...


1

Ninja n; ----> n is in stack.You needn't destory it manually. new Ninja;----> n is in heap. you should delete it with delete enemy; when you needn't it Notice: when using the pointer of father class to delete the object of child class. You'd better define a virtual destructor function in both of classs.


0

The new () will create an instance dynamically in memory ( like malloc () in C ) the first declaration has a statically allocated memory for the instance ( or allocated in teh stack if the declaration is inside a function ). with new (), you will have to destroy the instance once it is no longer needed through the delete () method.


0

String s1 = new String("one"); create a new string object in memory, while String s2 = "one"; use the string pool. It is not a good practice to use new keyword when dealing with string in java.


7

String s1 = new String("one"); // will be created on the heap and not interned unless .intern() is called explicityly. String s2 = "one"; // will be created in the String pool and interned automatically by the compiler.


3

It is not enough to cast the pre-allocated memory poiner to your user-defined type unless this UDT is "trivial". Instead, you may want to use the placement new expression to actually call the constructor of your type at the provided region of memory: A* b = new(pre_allocated_memory_pointer) A(); Of course, you need to ensure that your memory is properly ...


2

As I understand your question you are confusing the data memory of the std::vector with the memory it takes up as a member. If you convert pre_allocated_memory_pointer to A*, then no constructor got called and you have an invalid object there. This means that the v1 member will not have been constructed and hence no memory has been allocated for the vector. ...


3

An std::vector is an object that requires initialization, you cannot just allocate memory and pretend you've got a vector. If you need to control where to get the memory from the solution is defining operator::new for your class. struct MyClass { std::vector<int> x; ... other stuff ... void *operator new(size_t sz) { ... get ...


1

I remember intervening "in urgence" on an application that was leaking badly: the improvements needed to be loaded quickly the application was already leaking, though less badly the non-regressions were known to be incomplete the application had never run under valgrind (it's not trivial to run multi-threaded code with tight timeout dependencies under ...


0

If you want to allocate memory like this, you should use std::unqiue_ptr. Change T* out_array = new T[size1+size2]; to std::unique_ptr<T[]> out_array(new T[size1 + size2]); change the merge_sort signature to return unique_ptr<T[]>, fix arr1 and arr2 types and do not delete it manually at all. This aproach is better than using delete[], ...



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