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4

Compare the Request headers. Chrome is probably sending an Accept-Encoding header that says that a gzipped response is OK while PHP is not. Consequently, the server is responding differently.


3

No, you do not need to use Apache/Nginx, Go handles TLS just fine. Check http.ListenAndServeTLS Example: ➜ sudo letsencrypt certonly --standalone --agree-tos --email you@email.com -d domain1.com [-d domain2.com, etc..] ➜ sudo cat /etc/letsencrypt/archive/domain1.com/fullchain1.pem > cert.pem ➜ sudo cat /etc/letsencrypt/archive/domain1.com/privkey1.pem ...


2

The reason for your 404 error is that your Nginx container has no files in it. You must link the same files you linked into the PHP-FPM container into the Nginx container: version: '2' services: nginx: build: ./nginx ports: - "80:80" - "443:443" volumes: - ./php/code:/var/www/html/ fpm: build: ./php volumes: ...


2

My understanding is that hmget returns multi-bulk reply, which has the result in a lua table, so you should probably do something like this: local res, err = red:hmget(userName,"password") local redisPassword if res and res ~= ngx.null then redisPassword = res[1] end ngx.say(redisPassword) From the documentation: A non-nil Redis "multi-bulk reply" ...


2

Thank you guys. I got it corrected myself. There was an error in inforgein.conf. I restored the old configuration file.


2

Nginx cannot run the index.rb script, in part because it does not have an embedded ruby (or python) interpreter. What you might want to do is to run your script through a uWSGI app. As documented here, for ruby, you need to create an app.ru script with a call entry point (which will just load your index.rb script). It is then run via: uwsgi --socket ...


2

Nginx is not capable of looking into SSL connections to determine the protocols used to further forward the connection to either an http/https upstream, or a VPN. It can handle any arbitrary TCP streams now (and load-balance the connections without looking into payload), but unless you have more than one port or more than one IP address, you'll have to ...


2

TL;DR The reason that Unicorn is usually deployed together with a reverse proxy like nginx is because its creators deliberately designed it so, making a tradeoff for simplicity. First of all, there's nothing keeping you from deploying Unicorn without a reverse proxy. However, it's not a very good idea to do so. Let's see why. Unicorn follows the Unix ...


1

Yes, you have to uninstall nginix (installed via rpm) and re-install it according to the mentioned document that is from source file. There are some disadvantages of installing nginx using source, like you cannot use nginx as a service. Here, you can find instructions to do same job in with all the functionalities you get while installing nginx using ...


1

I guess it maybe to late for the answer but anyway... The excerpt you have posed has the filter disabled. enabled = false As there is not mentioning of Fail2Ban version and syslog/fail2ban logs are missing for this jail. I tested your Filter on fail2ban 0.9.3-1 and it works fine although I had to enable it and had to drop the line with action = ...


1

I see the "Sign in through STEAM" image and google-font are loaded via http. Here's the copy as curl of it: curl 'http://steamcommunity-a.akamaihd.net/public/images/signinthroughsteam/sits_large_noborder.png' -H 'Accept-Encoding: gzip, deflate, sdch' -H 'Accept-Language: en-US,en;q=0.8' -H 'User-Agent: Mozilla/5.0 (X11; Linux x86_64) AppleWebKit/537.36 ...


1

Please figure out if you can try this. in a middleware module, check what is the hostname. set the DB based on the hostname. if hostname == 'site1.com': DATABASES = { 'default': { 'ENGINE': 'django.db.backends.mysql', 'NAME': 'site1DB', 'USER': 'root', 'PASSWORD': '*****', 'HOST': 'localhost', ...


1

That's not needed at all anymore unless you're using nginx for caching, Golang 1.6+ is more than good enough to server http and https directly. However if you're insisting, and I will secretly judge you and laugh at you, here's the work flow: Your go app listens on a local port, say "127.0.0.1:8080" nginx listens on 0.0.0.0:80 and 0.0.0.0:443 and proxies ...


1

If you're using emperor mode and your uWSGI configs differs only in socket and DJANGO_SETTINGS_MODULE, consider using one config file for all sites. You will start new site basically by creating symlink in uWSGI emperor directory and special variables inside that config will construct socket names and DJANGO_SETTINGS_MODULE variable based on symlink name. ...


1

Add the following block to your configuration to handle static files. location ~* ^.+.(jpg|jpeg|gif|css|png|js|ico|xml)$ { access_log off; expires 30d; root /path/to/public/root; }


1

Debian/Ubuntu use a standard directory hierarchy. The command man hier will describe this for you. It is common for packages to create symlinks to place files in the correct place when the program expects them elsewhere. Try Creating Symlink sudo ln -s /usr/share/nginx /usr/local/nginx


1

You can't protect it, it's just a matter of making it slightly more difficult for an average Joe. Some options to explore: use CSRF token, check Referer HTTP header, make it available only for authenticated users (registration with email, captcha, credit card, etc), throttling and blacklist by IP (+browser fingerprint), sky is the limit. Are you asking how ...


1

Sounds about right probably except are you sure you need multiple instances of your Node app on different ports? Because you might be able to handle more load than you would assume with one server and there are ways to separate out different communications channels with socket.io.


1

I never used php-fpm but the doc here would help you I think: https://hub.docker.com/r/bitnami/php-fpm/ They explain how to setup a nginx in a separate container to server content from a "naked" php-fpm container, you only have to repeat the step for each php-fpm container but keeping the same nginx container. Solution 2 seems to be the way to go, ...


1

You should only need 1 nginx container per host, and use that to load balance between your php containers. If you set the restart policy correctly on the nginx container, it should always be running, and nginx can handle a lot of load, so only one should be fine. It also gets harder to manage when you have more than one nginx, since only one container can ...


1

You're trying to run a script file with bash -c, do you see that? That's not what you want. (The error messages say the content of ./shared/nginx_test.conf is not understood, which Bash interprets as terminal commands.) You probably want to run something like nginx -g daemon off as a command, and append the configuration file as an argument: nginx: # ...


1

Replace your current location / with the following code: location / { try_files $uri $uri/ /index.php?$query_string; } And then replace the location below it with: location ~ \.php$ { fastcgi_split_path_info ^(.+\.php)(/.+)$; fastcgi_pass unix:/var/run/php/php7.0-fpm.sock; fastcgi_index index.php; include fastcgi_params; }


1

From your log: User is requesting: /assets/uploads/blog/name-of-image.jpg Nginx is looking for the image in: /home/deploy/MYAPPNAME/shared/public/assets/uploads/blog/name-of-image.jpg You confirmed that the image is in: home/deploy/MYAPPNAME/shared/public/uploads/blog/name-of-image.jpg Nginx is looking in public/assets/uploads, your file is in ...


1

You have a syntax error. server { listen 80; server_name mysite.com; # <--- Missing semicolon root /usr/local/nginx/sites/mysite; index index.php index.html; location / { root /usr/local/nginx/sites/mysite; index index.php index.html index.htm; } location ~ \.php$ { ...


1

John Doe's link would probly do the trick another reference you can look at is https://www.digitalocean.com/community/tutorials/how-to-install-and-secure-phpmyadmin-on-ubuntu-16-04. It's updated for Ubuntu 16.04


1

You have to define upstrem directive. Currently your nginx can not proxy to your web application. http://nginx.org/en/docs/http/ngx_http_upstream_module.html upstream backend { server backend1.example.com weight=5; server backend2.example.com:8080; server unix:/tmp/backend3; server backup1.example.com:8080 backup; server ...


1

You have constructed a rewrite loop. The index directive effectively generates an internal rewrite to /index.html whenever a URL with a trailing / is presented. One way to break the loop is to only apply your rewrite rules when the external URL contains index.html. The variable $request_uri contains the external URL and can be tested using an if directive. ...


1

It seems , some other service is using that address or port you are trying to access with nginx . So find out any second process which is using that port . And close it and then start the nginx .


1

Try to run nginx in the foreground mode to check out what is the reason why it fails: nginx -g "daemon off;" If you will still get the error: bind() to 0.0.0.0:80 failed Then maybe a service runs already on port 80. Then try to find out which service it is with the lsof command and kill it with kill -15 or kill -9. You can check if something is ...


1

You could simply put the Token into a cookie. That way, it will be send to the server automatically by the browser, and you could use it for authentication when the user accesses a downloadable file directly. Instead of reading the Authorization: header, tell your Django middleware to read the token string from the cookie.



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