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50

My mistake was not appending the -g on the npm list command. npm list -g Once I did that, I saw my list of globally installed modules (e.g. bower, jshint, mocha), and at the very end: npm ERR! peer invalid: flatiron@0.3.0 /usr/lib/node_modules/jitsu/node_modules/flatiron npm ERR! not ok code 0 Then I ran this command to see which ones were using ...


11

Your input[type=file] doesn't have a name attribute, which upsets Express/Connect. So try this: <input type="file" id="csvFile" name="csvFile">


10

Yupp you guys are right - irc channel found the right people instantly. So the answer from @AvianFlu is that nodejitsu doesn't host databases. However you can create couch, redis or mongo database instances with: jitsu databases create <database type> <database name> That will create databases hosted on eg. RedisToGo, CouchIris, or MongoHQ ...


10

Local modules like this should work properly.. so long as you don't have it in .gitignore or .npmignore. Modules in the node_modules directory require that you add it to the bundledDependencies array in your package.json file. An easy way to check for whether the file is included in your deploy is to run tar -tf $(npm pack).


9

If you don't mind keeping jitsu installed, you can just upgrade jitsu and this should work. npm install -g jitsu npm install -g grunt-cli


7

You should have received a url from jitsu that looked something like mongodb://username:password@somehost.mongohq.com:port/database You can pass this information into pretty much any mongodb connection tool, though usually not as a raw connection string (mongoose is an exception). For example, with the mongo cli client: mongo ...


7

I work for nodejitsu. First, I believe your problem can be solved by using bundledDependencies in your package.json like so: { "bundledDependencies": [ "myModule", "myFork" ] } Then, when jitsu bundles your app for deployment (which uses npm), it will also bundle your dependency with it. If the package is on a personal fork of a project on github, npm ...


6

Execute npm pack inside your application and make sure that the resulting package includes the file. Nodejitsu uses the same command when deploying your app. In case it is not included in the package, you should look into your .gitignore and/or .npmignore files to ensure that the folder or contained files ar not ignored. Note that any files/folders ...


5

(jump to last paragraph if you want a really easy solution) I'm having a hard time understanding your app structure. I think I get what your trying to do though. From https://npmjs.org/doc/folders.html , it actually goes into detail about when and why sub modules will or wont show up. When installing locally, npm first tries to find an appropriate ...


5

That should work, but check 'npm bin -g' to make sure that directory is on your path.


4

Two questions: Are you running jitsu from the CLI? i.e. just: jitsu help or jitsu? Do you have winston installed globally? Give this a shot: sudo npm uninstall jitsu winston -g sudo npm install jitsu -g jitsu


4

Two things that you might be doing that cause this: Make sure you're using port > 1024 (no sudo) Make sure your app is < 50mb disk space If this doesn't work please either email support at nodejitsu or visit #nodejitsu at irc.freenode.org


4

The reason why it doesn't work out of the box is because the redis package comes bundled with hiredis, which is a C library used by redis for parsing redis code. Nodejitsu does not guarantee that C libraries will work out of the box because the code must be compiled on their servers, and there are no guarantees that it'll execute the makefile in the same ...


4

To get an SSL certificate working with a custom domain on Nodejitsu, you can do the following: Subscribe to a "business" plan on Nodejitsu (custom domain + SSL isn't available for "individual" plans). Set up your DNS to use your domain. Create a certificate signing request (CSR), maybe by using OpenSSL like this. Buy your SSL certificate from your ...


3

This is a bug in jitsu v0.9.1. Try updating to v0.9.3! This should fix the issues you're having here. If you have more problems, email support@nodejitsu.com and we'll be glad to follow up. edit: You can do this by running npm install jitsu -g again.


3

Read section "Keeping files out of your package" in the NPM Developer page. It states following Use a .npmignorefile to keep stuff out of your package. If there's no .npmignore file, but there is a .gitignore file, then npm will ignore the stuff matched by the .gitignore file. If you want to include something that is excluded by your .gitignore file, ...


3

The reasons for running a reverse proxy are: You have limited IP ports open and need to run many Node services each of which needs it's own port Your back-end service does not support HTTPS but you need it (e.g. Derby) To add some other feature to the request that cannot be easily done with the back end such as adding Basic Authentication or some form of ...


3

Nodejitsu uses node-http-proxy to proxy https to http, to your app. The proxy supports websockets in both http and https modes. So, as long as your app can talk websockets over http, it should be fine. I'd recommend shooting us an email at support@nodejitsu.com with the details. --Josh


3

If you ever get stuck in something like this please feel free to drop by #nodejitsu at freenode. Answering your question: An array containing a list of package names you have bundled in your package. The convention here is to make sure your bundled dependencies exist in the node_modules/ folder. Packages listed in bundleDependencies will ...


3

How about implementing a grunt.js task to do it? This works: module.exports = function(grunt) { grunt.registerTask('bundle', 'A task that bundles all dependencies.', function () { // "package" is a reserved word so it's abbreviated to "pkg" var pkg = grunt.file.readJSON('./package.json'); // set the bundled dependencies to the keys of the ...


3

For anyone else having this issue you need 2 commands: npm cache clear sudo npm install jitsu -g At Nodejitsu"s github they recommend to install it without [sudo] on OSX but seems to fail on 10.6.8 Happy coding!


3

Full disclosure: I work on the Heroku Add-ons team. Going through your suggested options: 1) Dynos are ephemeral and are restarted whenever you deploy a code change, update a config var, or at least once a day. You'd still need to work out how to handle persistance or rebuild the index every time one of those events occurred. 2) You've actually got 3 ...


3

on a normal Node.js installation on windows you will find the npm modules located at C:\Program Files\nodejs\node_modules\npm\bin or in C:\Users\user\AppData\Roaming\npm\jitsu You need to set up the PATH environment variable to the correct path An then you will be able to use Nodejitsu :)


3

webrtc.io.js was actually a symlink, and npm and nodejitsu don't package and deploy those (https://github.com/nodejitsu/jitsu/issues/379). $ ls -al example/public webrtc.io.js -> ../../node_modules/webrtc.io-client/lib/webrtc.io.js So for now I put a workaround as a predeploy/postdeploy hack that copies the actually file into example/public/ from ...


3

You're calling res.end() synchronously, before the readFile callback executes. You need to call res.end() after everything is finished – after you finish all of the callbacks. (whether or not an error occurred)


3

Ah, omit the app.configure wrapper entirely. Just take the code inside it and have it be top-level. Nodejitsu is running your app with NODE_ENV=production, not development. In general, any configuration that should always be run, such as all of your code above should NOT be put in an app.configure callback. I never use app.configure at all as it is so ...


3

You can write a simple proxy using the request module, like this: var http = require('http'), request = require('request'); // For nodejitsu, this will be port 80 externally var port = process.env.PORT || 8000; http.createServer(function(req,res) { req.pipe(request(req.url)).pipe(res) }).listen(port); However, this will only work with http, not ...


3

HTTP 502 means "Bad Gateway" and usually the sign of a reverse proxy somewhere along the path between client and server. If you're sure it's not because of your own setup, you should try to disable the websocket (and flashsocket) transports for socket.io: var io = require('socket.io').listen(...); io.set('transports', [ 'xhr-polling', 'jsonp-polling', ...


3

You can use an empty .npmignore file on your app folder and jitsu will upload the files! Remember that jitsu uses npm deploys, so .gitignore will ignore files for git and npm if there is no .npmignore file defined. So an empty .npmignore file should do the trick ;) Source: I work for Nodejitsu


2

npm ERR! error installing jwcrypto@0.1.1 npm ERR! error installing browserid-verifier@0.0.4 npm ERR! ...SSL routines:SSL23_GET_SERVER_HELLO:unknown protocol:s23_clnt.c:683: This is what I got while I was trying to install browserid-verifier locally. It seems that there is some problem while trying to npm install it. You can bundle it in your app. ...



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