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92

Greedy will consume as much as possible. From http://www.regular-expressions.info/repeat.html we see the example of trying to match HTML tags with <.+>. Suppose you have the following: <em>Hello World</em> You may think that <.+> (. means anything and + means repeated) would only match the <em> and the </em>, when in ...


48

The non-greedy ? works perfectly fine. Its just that you need to select dot matches all option in the regex engines( regexpal, the engine you used, also has this option ) you are testing with. This is because, regex engines generally dont match line breaks when you use .. You need to tell them explicitly that you want to match line-breaks too with . ie ...


17

Greedy means match longest possible string. Lazy means match shortest possible string. For example, the greedy h.+l matches 'hell' in 'hello' but the lazy h.+?l matches 'hel'.


15

Greedy means your expression will match as large a group as possible, lazy means it will match the smallest group possible. For this string: abcdefghijklmc and this expression: a.*c A greedy match will match the whole string, and a lazy match will match just the first abc.


15

You can use ? after * or + to make it ungreedy, e.g. (.*?)


10

Another thing to consider is how long the target text is, and how much of it is going to be matched by the quantified subexpression. For example, if you were trying to match the whole <BODY> element in a large HTML document, you might be tempted to use this regex: /<BODY>.*?<\/BODY>/is But that's going to do a whole lot of unnecessary ...


10

You could use something like MatchCollection nonGreedyMatches = Regex.Matches("abcd", @"(((ab)c)d)"); Then you should have 3 backreferences with ab, abc and abcd But to be honest, this kind of reg ex doesn't makes to much sense, especially when it gets bigger it becomes unreadable edit: MatchCollection nonGreedyMatches = Regex.Matches("abcd", ...


9

Laziness and greediness applies to quantifiers only (?, *, +, {min,max}). Alternations always match in order and try the first possible match.


9

Not easily, because a successful match is not retried. Consider, for example: object X extends RegexParsers { def p = ("a" | "aa" | "aaa" | "aaaa") ~ "ab" } scala> X.parseAll(X.p, "aaaab") res1: X.ParseResult[X.~[String,String]] = [1.2] failure: `ab' expected but `a' found aaaab ^ The first match was successful, in parser inside parenthesis, so ...


8

What you're missing isn't so much about greediness as about regular expression engines: they work from left to right, so the / matches as early as possible and the .*? is then forced to work from there. In this case, the best regex doesn't involve greediness at all (you need backtracking for that to work; it will, but could take a really long time to run ...


8

It is being non-greedy. It is your understanding of non-greedy that is not correct. A regex will allways try to match. Let me show a simplified example of what non-greedy actually means(as suggested by a comment): re.findall(r'a*?bc*?', 'aabcc', re.DOTALL) This will match: as few repetitions of 'a' as possible (in this case 2) followed by a 'b' and as ...


7

The complemented character class more rigorously defines what you want to match, so whenever you can, I'd use it. The non greedy regex will match things you probably don't want, such as: <A HREF="foo" NAME="foo" TARGET="_blank">foo</A> where your first .*? matches foo" NAME="foo


7

Note that your examples are not equivalent. Your first regular expression will not select any links that contain other tags, such as img or b. The second regular expression will, and I expect that's probably what you wanted anyway. Besides the difference in meaning, the only disadvantage I can think of is that support for non-greedy modifiers isn't quite as ...


7

Because your patterns are non-greedy, so they matched as little text as possible while still consisting of a match. Remove the ? in the second group, and you'll get word word word big small Matcher mtch = Pattern.compile("test is a (\\s*.+?\\s*) word (\\s*.+\\s*)").matcher(test);


7

the ? operand makes match non-greedy. E.g. .* is greedy while .*? isn't. So you can use something like <img.*?> to match the whole tag. Or <img[^>]*>. But remember that the whole set of HTML can't be actually parsed with regexps.


6

Try printing out $& (the text matched by the entire regex) as well as $1. This may give you a better idea of what's happening. The problem you seem to have is that .*? does not mean "Find the match out of all possible matches that uses the fewest characters here." It just means "First, try matching 0 characters here, and go on to match the rest of the ...


6

The lazy (.*?) will always match nothing, because the following greedy .* will always match everything. You need to be more specific: if($_line_ =~ m/document\.all\.(\w+)/) will only match alphanumeric characters after document.all.


6

Well that is expected since .* means 0 or more and by putting ? you make it non-greedy hence it match an empty string. If you want to match a then you should use: /.+?/.exec("abc"); DIfference is + instead of * which means match 1 or more characters using non-greedy quantifier.


5

It looks like you're trying to word break things. To do that you need the entire expression to be correct, your current one is not. Try this one instead.. new Regex(@"\b(in|int|into|internal|interface)\b"); The "\b" says to match word boundaries, and is a zero-width match. This is locale dependent behavior, but in general this means whitespace and ...


5

SED doesn't support non-greedy matching, so you'll need to make the '.*' term less greedy by making it pickier in what it will accept. I don't have a corpus of the kind of things you're looking for, but I'm going to assume that you don't want to find anything with embedded curly brackets. If so, then you could use: sed 's|{moslate}[^{]*{/moslate}||g' a.txt ...


5

First of all I want to explain why your current solution doesn't work: Since you've enabled SingleLine option, .* matches 999xxx888xxx777xxx666yyy\nxxx222xxx333, the pattern in parenthesis matches 444, and the rest of your Regex matches xxx555yyy. So to match both 777 and 444 you can either disable SingleLine option or use something like this: ...


5

As the name suggests, replaceAll replaces all matching groups. You need to be more specific where the group is matched. To specify the first matching group you can specify the start of String ^ as an anchor: "city,state,country".replaceAll("^(.*?,)", "")


5

The .*? quantifier means that it will find as few characters as possible to satisfy the match, it doesn't mean that it will stop searching at the first > it finds. So in your example, the <x.*?> will match all of: <x>ipsum <x>dolor sit amet</x> With all the characters between the first x and the the final > satisfying the ...


5

The regex engine always find the left-most match. That's why you get <span style='font-size:11.0pt;'>DON'T_WANT_THIS_MATCHED <span style='font-size:18.0pt;'>TheTextToFind</span> as a match. (Basically the whole input, sans the last </span>). To steer the engine in the correct direction, if we assume that > doesn't appear ...


4

I think the problem is that you're misinterpreting how a non-greedy quantifier acts. Once it's in operation, yes, it stops earlier than it would otherwise. But it isn't aware of what comes before it (or potentially the text that comes later, either). It's only concerned with it's current position. Hence, the regular expression you posted will match all ...


4

Nongreedy regular expressions can be slow because the engine has to do a lot of backtracking. This one uses only greedy expressions: @"""([^""]*/thumbs/[^""]*)""" Instead of matching the least amount of anything, it matches as many non-double-quotes as it can.


4

If you know that the string between moslates will not contain curly braces, you could do this: sed 's/{moslate}[^{}]*{\/moslate}//g'


4

Close: $input = "Hello **bold** world"; $output = preg_replace("/\*\*(.*?)\*\*/", "<b>$1</b>", $input);


4

Note that you can simply do: getText().substring(2, getText().length()-2) on the COMMENT token since the first and the last 2 characters will always be /* and */. You could also remove the options {greedy=false;} : since both .* and .+ are ungreedy (although without the . they are greedy) (i). EDIT Or use setText(...) on the Comment token to discard ...


4

Well, the non Greedy match is working - it gets the shortest string that satisfies the regex. The thing that you have to remember is that regex is a left to right process. So it matches the first Q, then gets the shortest number of characters followed by an XYZ. If you want it not to go past any Qs, you have to use a negated character class: Q[^Q]*?XYZ ...



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